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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Historical study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and semantics of English; the relation between linguistic and cultural change. LEC
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A study of contemporary English: phonology, morphology, syntax, and usage. The emphasis is structural, but "traditional" grammar is referred to for contrast, example, and clarification. LEC
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Examination of a significant topic in literature or the English language. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
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Acquaintance with resources and practice in techniques that are essential to other graduate courses. Major concerns include the writing and documentation of scholarly papers; basic reference and bibliographical aids; critical approaches to literature and literary historiography; and the place of language and rhetoric in English studies today. LEC
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A survey of major concepts and issues in the study of writing, especially as applied to teaching composition. Practices in writing pedagogy are also discussed, and students' teaching of composition is observed and explored. Required of and enrollment limited to new teachers of English 101. May not be repeated for credit toward graduate degree. FLD
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A course concerned primarily with the pedagogy of literature and writing about literature. Includes weekly group meetings, individual conferences, and class visitations. Required of and enrollment limited to new teachers of English 102. May not be repeated for credit toward graduate degree. Course graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. FLD
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A course for graduate teaching assistants pursuing the M.F.A. or Ph.D. with emphasis in Creative Writing. Normally taken in the third year. Concerns primarily the pedagogy of creative writing: workshop techniques, approaches to conferencing, revision strategies, and the like. Includes weekly group meetings as well as class visitations and individual conferences. May not be repeated for credit towards graduate degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ENGL 801 and 802. FLD
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Examination of selected topics in composition and rhetoric, such as literary studies, genre theory, dialogism, or writing across the curriculum. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: ENGL 780 or equivalent. LEC
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This course explores theories motivating writing center administration and practice. Students will investigate the multiple functions of writing centers, from writing labs associated with college composition instruction, to decentralized resources for writing faculty teaching writing across the disciplines, to elementary, secondary, and community support centers for writers, to online administrative perspective, design a research study and propose actions such as creating policy, developing curricula, designing materials, or conducting assessments. (Same as LA&S 700.) Prerequisite: LA&S 400, ENGL 400, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Practical experience under professional supervision in editing, theatrical production, and other activities relevant to the completion of an advanced degree in English. FLD
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An independent reading course for students preparing to take the M.A. examination. The grade in the course will be an S or U, as determined by performance on the examination. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. RSH
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Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Intensive study of one or more theoretical aspects of composition in English (e.g., rhetoric, text grammar, stylistics). Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Close study of the English language in a particular period. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Close study of one or more major critics, of a major critical school, or of a topic important in literary criticism. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Study may center on either Old or Middle English language and literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Close study of one or two major authors or of a group of related works. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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One or two authors are read closely, or a group of related works is studied. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Concentrated study of one or two major figures, or a group of significant writers, or an aspect of the literary scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Concentrated study of one or two authors, or a group of significant writers, or an aspect of the literary scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Concentrated study of one or two authors or of historical periods or important movements. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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Advanced study in a topic related to literature, language, and cultures of Africa and the African Diaspora, such as a concentrated study of one or two authors, a group of significant writers, an historical period or important movement, or an aspect of the literary or cultural scene of Black writing. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
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Advanced study in a topic related to literature, language, theory, or a special skill such as analytical bibliography or editing. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
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An independent reading course for students preparing to take the Ph.D. comprehensive examination. May normally be taken in the semester or summer session immediately preceding the semester in which the comprehensive examination is taken. Does not count toward the residence requirement. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. RSH
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Individual work in (a) language, (b) literature, (c) composition, or (d) the teaching of English, by properly qualified graduate students under the direction of appropriate members of the Graduate Faculty as assigned by the Graduate Director. Limited to 6 hours of credit toward the M.A. or Ph.D. degree; only on three-hour enrollment may substitute for a formal course in satisfying a field distribution requirement. Normally offered for only up to three credit hours in any one enrollment. Permission of the supervising faculty member and of the Graduate Director required for enrollment. RSH
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Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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This course will provide an introduction to the University and School of Engineering community and the value and role of higher education in our society, strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community, exploration of the University and School commitment to diversity and multiculturalism, and information about University and School resources and procedures. Prerequisite: Eligible students must have fewer than thirty credit hours from the University of Kansas. LEC
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An introductory level course with emphasis on engineering problem definition, methods simulation, and solution, including approaches to engineering design; engineering units and terminology; engineering disciplines and career areas, and engineering code of ethics. LEC
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This course will serve as an introduction to the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows Program and will focus on building student's skills in leadership, business, entrepreneurship, management, communication, engineering, and interpersonal skills. Prerequisite: Students must have applied, interviewed, and been accepted as a Self Engineering Leadership Fellow. LEC
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This course will serve as an introduction to the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows Program and will focus on building student's skills in leadership, business, entrepreneurship, management, communication, engineering, and interpersonal skills. Prerequisite: Students must have applied, interviewed, and been accepted as a Self Engineering Leadership Fellow. LEC
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This course will serve as an introduction to the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows Program and will focus on building student's skills in leadership, business, entrepreneurship, management, communication, engineering, and interpersonal skills. Prerequisite: Students must have applied, interviewed, and been accepted as a Self Engineering Leadership Fellow. LEC
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This course will serve as an introduction to the Self Engineering Leadership Fellows Program and will focus on building student's skills in leadership, business, entrepreneurship, management, communication, engineering, and interpersonal skills. Prerequisite: Students must have applied, interviewed, and been accepted as a Self Engineering Leadership Fellow. LEC
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The concept of weapons systems and the systems approach are explored. The techniques of linear analysis of ballistics and weapons are introduced. The dynamics of the basic components of weapons control systems are investigated and stated as transfer functions. This course provides the tools for the future development in the student's understanding of the basic principles that underlie all modern naval weapons systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as NAVY 180.) Prerequisite: MATH 002. LEC
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The concept of weapons systems and the systems approach are explored. The techniques of linear analysis of ballistics and weapons are introduced. The dynamics of the basic components of weapons control systems are investigated and stated as transfer functions. This course provides the tools for the future development in the student's understanding of the basic principles that underlie all modern naval weapons systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective Fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as NAVY 184.) LEC
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Engineering work experience with a recognized engineering organization. The work must be professional in nature and not merely routine. A final summary report must be submitted to the student's major department at the conclusion of each continuous period of employment and may cover more than one sequential semester or summer session. Credit for this course cannot be used toward graduation requirements. Prerequisite: Permission of major department. FLD
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First semester juniors. Three hours classroom and two and one-half hours laboratory per week. A comprehensive study of the theory, principles, and procedures of ship navigation in coastal and open ocean environment. Includes piloting, triangulation, ocean and tidal currents, navigational astronomy, spherical trigonometry, sight reduction, publications and logs; an introduction to electronic navigation, including theory of wave propagation, hyperbolic and azimuthal systems, doppler, inertial, and satellite systems. (Same as NAVY 300.) LEC
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An examination of the role of technology and its influence on society. The historical development of technology will be traced up to modern times with an emphasis on its relations to the humanities. Attention will be given to the future of different branches of technology and alternative programs for their implementation. (Same as HIST 404.) LEC
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Second semester juniors. Three hours classroom and two and one-half hours laboratory per week. A study of laws for the prevention of ship collisions; tactical formations and dispositions, relative motion, and maneuvering board. Major portion of the semester is devoted to operations research and analysis, with an introduction to discrete probability theory, game theory, measures of effectiveness, active and passive sonar equations, and review of systems analysis and cost effectiveness. (Same as NAVY 304.) Prerequisite: MATH 111 or higher. LEC
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Courses on special topics of current interest to engineers, such as ethics, engineering economics, engineering practice, communications, teamwork, and professional and career development. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. FLD
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Engineering internship in an approved company. Internship hours do not satisfy any course requirements for a bachelors degree in any School of Engineering major, but will appear on the transcript. Credit assigned after review of report on internship experience. FLD
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The process of planning, organizing, initiating, drafting, and editing engineering documents is covered through writing assignments and discussion. Writing, editing, and publishing the Kansas Engineer magazine. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. FLD
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Meets one hour per week. Planning, preparing, and presenting speeches on a variety of topics throughout the semester. Includes preparing speeches, spontaneous speeches and the evaluation of speeches by other students. Prerequisite: Two English courses and at least junior or senior standing in engineering or consent of instructor. FLD
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A design problem or system study satisfying the project requirement for the Master of Engineering degree. THE
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A major design problem or system study satisfying the project requirement for the Doctor of Engineering degree. THE
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. The course will emphasize the Entrepreneurial Process in which each of the following disciplines will be introduced so that the student understands meaning, interrelationship and the application of the subject matter. First the student will be introduced to entrepreneurship and the personal attributes which historically have produced successful entrepreneurs. Further, the student will learn how to evaluate business opportunities via Feasibility Analysis which encompasses industry and competitor analysis, developing an effective business model, building a new venture team, developing an effective marketing plan, assessing the new ventures financial strengths and preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation for the new business. Finally, on completion of the course the student will possess a beginning comprehension for getting financing for the new venture and preparing for the challenges of business growth. Prerequisite: Math 101 and English 101. LEC
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This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Prerequisite: Math 101 and English 101. LEC
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This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Prerequisite: ENTR 301 and ENTR 302. LEC
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This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Prerequisite: ENTR 303. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of entrepreneurship topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. Learning will be achieved by both study and discussion of key entrepreneurial business issues as well as the critical appraisal of new venture business plans as presented in the text. Readings in entrepreneurship and case studies, contained in the text as well as in video presentations, will be used to illustrate the essential entrepreneurial management issues. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course builds upon the foundation created by the Introduction to Entrepreneurship course. It will provide the student with two learning opportunities: first, it details the critical success factors of starting a new venture, growing it and finally harvesting it profitably; secondly, this course will provide hands-on instruction regarding the development of a complete and compelling business plan. Students will work as teams on the development of a business plan for the purposes of commercializing an innovative business concept or KU lab-sourced technology. These student teams will also present and defend their business plans at various venues including intercollegiate competitions for the purposes of improving their team interaction skills, their presentation capabilities. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The course focuses on the development of new business ideas for new or established organizations, creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry, potential customers, market segment, barriers to entry and competitor set. The development of each of these subjects will lead to a feasibility analysis which each student will prepare for his/her chosen new venture. This course will also examine the development of the optimal sales and distribution. Additionally, the course will provide an understanding of how to translate the product/service idea to the business concept and marketing positioning. Lastly, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing communications program. Prerequisite: ENTR 410 and MKTG 310. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course looks at the unique aspects of owning and managing a small business, family business or franchise, with the owners having close control over operations and management decisions. Students will examine the startup options of buying, starting, or franchising; operations and human resources management; the unique factors of the family business; marketing, including setting prices, choosing a location, developing competitive advantage, positioning, and promotion with limited resources; financial statements, accounting systems, financing, cash flow and the working-capital cycle; and exit through selling, bequeathing, or dissolving the business. Prerequisite: ENTR 410. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide a forum for collaborative learning in entrepreneurship and allow students to apply the models and theories learned in previous courses in practical applications to actual entrepreneurial challenges. This course will further unlock and engage the entrepreneurial mindset, better equipping students to a variety of stimuli will be employed to generate discussion including: development of an actual start up business, an online new venture simulation game, analysis of entrepreneurially focused business cases, and development of an entrepreneurial business case. In this course students will learn the many facets of running an entrepreneurial business and what it takes for a business to succeed. Prerequisite: ENTR 410 (MGMT 475) or instructor approval. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in entrepreneurship not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Enrollment restricted. RSH
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In this course the student examines the disciplines which comprise the critical success factors in entrepreneurship and develops a fundamental understanding of the basic skill set required to manage his/her own business. The course will emphasize the Entrepreneurial Process in which each of the following disciplines will be introduced so that the student understands meaning, interrelationship and the application of the subject matter. First the student will be introduced to entrepreneurship and the personal attributes which historically have produced successful entrepreneurs. Further, the student will learn how to evaluate business opportunities via Feasibility Analysis which encompasses industry and competitor analysis, developing an effective business model, building a new venture team, developing an effective marketing plan, assessing the new venture's financial strengths and preparing the proper ethical and legal foundation for the new business. Finally, on completion of the course the student will possess a beginning comprehension for getting financing for the new venture and preparing for the challenges of business growth. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
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This course introduces the non-business student to the language of business, accounting, and its applications in the financial management of new and small business environments. Students will learn how to account for the various activities of the start-up and early stage new venture as well as the importance, utility and construction of financial statements. Further, students will acquire the ability to construct financial projections for a start-up firm and monitor the financial performance of the growing business with a focus on cash flow management. Finally, students will be introduced to various remedies in the event that performance does not meet expectations. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
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This course focuses on the marketing development of new business ideas for small businesses including creating an environment conducive to innovation, recognizing business opportunities, assessing the industry and its potential customer segments, barriers to entry and competitive set. In addition, students will acquire an understanding of the primary marketing tools available to the entrepreneur to drive customer awareness, initial and repeat purchase and the ability to fully integrate each of those tools into a cohesive, integrated marketing plan, all on an extremely limited budget as typifies start up businesses. Upon successful completion of the course, students will understand how to plan an entrepreneurial marketing program, implement it and evaluate its performance. This includes market analysis, segmentation, the marketing mix of product, price, promotion and distribution and marketing strategy, both long term and annually. Not open to students in the School of Business. LEC
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This course provides the student with an opportunity to prepare a complete go-to-market business plan for a new venture which leverages the students' major area of study so that following graduation the student has the option of pursuing self employment in the launch of their own business. The students' expertise from their area of major study will be combined with the entrepreneurial skills acquired from the prior three courses in this Certificate sequence. Ideally, this course will originate from the students' school of origin, either selected from a roster of existing qualifying courses or independent study with a faculty member in the students' field of major study. In the event that the students' school of major study cannot provide the teaching resources for independent study, it will be provided by the School of Business, Center for Entrepreneurship. If the faculty at the students' school of origin wants to develop a specific course which completes the Certificate requirements, course preparation funding has been arranged via a grant from the Kauffman Foundation. Not open to students in the School of Business. Prerequisite: ENTR 703. LEC
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This course will focus on identifying and evaluating the business opportunity, the strategies to be developed and implemented as well as entrepreneurial capabilities required for marketplace success. Development of a robust and compelling business concept will be emphasized. Analyses of the industry, competition, the new business points of strategic leverage, creation of an effective business model and funding strategies will be studied. Financing the new venture, sourcing and structuring the required deal capital will be explored and attention to managing rapid growth and exit strategies will be provided. This course is not open to students with credit in ENTR 450. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of entrepreneurship to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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Introduction to fundamentals and processes involved in developing design concepts in the unit scale interior environment that may include residential or small scale commercial spaces. The studio focuses on developing design vocabulary, graphic representations, space planning, furniture and furnishings. Prerequisite: BDS 102. Prerequisite or corequisite: ENVD 212. Open to all students in the School of Architecture with permission of instructor based on space availability. LAB
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Study and analyze building materials, furniture and furnishings through investigation into their physical and technical characteristics, limitations, and applications. The course also introduces the sustainability issues that relate to the selections and specifications that impact the environment, energy use and limited resources. It covers various agencies and organizations that develop guidelines on materials, resources, building practices, processes and systems that support sustainable design. Open to all student in the School of Architecture with permission of the instructor based on space availability. LEC
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Introduction to visualization tools in applications to interior environments using freehand sketching and computer aided design. The class focuses on vocabulary and theories of different drawing systems and develops basic CAD skills using Autocad and related software to generate 3D digital modeling, scene descriptions and view manipulations. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted into the Environmental/Interior Design program and have completed BDS 102 and BDS 103. Open to other students in the School of Architecture with the permission of instructor based on space availability. LEC
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This studio focuses on topics that relate to specific environments that may include retailing, hospitality, health care, restaurants, or work space strategies in offices. Students conduct research, explore ideas and generate concepts at a more complex scale level. Emphasis will be placed on understanding of users' operational needs, company brand or image, adjacencies, spatial analyses, understanding of material and their applications, environmental factors, codes and regulations that impact the planning and selections. Related issues include lighting, furniture systems analysis and their applications, and custom casework design. Depending on availability, studio may work with other studio in Architecture or other discipline within the department on joint projects. This class may be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ENVD 200. Open to other students in the School of Architecture with permission of instructor based on space availability. LAB
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Examining and analyzing essential information necessary to determine the clients' present and future operational requirements and the space, facilities, and services required for support. Establishing pre-planning concepts and guidelines on building and space utilization. Effort is directed toward developing space into a functional, flexible, and aesthetic environment in which to work. Study includes the use of questionnaires, organization charts, space study and standards, space projections, space tabulations, and space distribution using interaction, blocking, and layering diagrams. Prerequisite: ENVD 200 and MATH 101. Open to all students in the School of Architecture with permission of instructor based on space availability. LAB
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This class provides individual students with the opportunity to develop a project of choice based on the individual's interest and design philosophy and incorporates the skills acquired from the integrated curriculum. Students will conduct initial research and data collection to develop a program that includes the schematic and preliminary design development. Projects may include corporate offices, retailing, health care, hospitality and restaurants, exhibitions, residential design, or specialty interior products. Effort will focus on the investigation of a component within a large or complex project. Prerequisite: ENVD 304. THE
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A continuation of ENVD 408 that focuses on further design development leading to final design solutions and explores in detail the design of the total environment. The use of materials and their limitations, sustainability, environmental factors, technology, graphics and signage, custom design casework and interior products, applicable codes and standards, budget, and construction document production are all part of the investigations. Final results may include a set of drawings, working drawings, detail drawings, 4D models and/or multi-media presentations. Prerequisite: ENVD 408. THE
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There are two different components to this class. The first is to develop the student's graduating portfolio that relates to the individual's professional interest. The second is the standards associated with the professional practice of a design office including office personnel and organization, scheduling, fee structures, contracts, billing, marketing and professional ethics. The course will include lectures, guest speakers, and field trips. Prerequisite: ENVD 304 and Senior Standing. LAB
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Individual research. Prerequisite: INTD 606 or equivalent. RSH
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Continuation of INTD 715. RSH
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This course is for students seeking Departmental Honors in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. At the completion of the required four hours of total enrollment, a written and oral report of the research is required. (Same as PHSX 501.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics. IND
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This course is for students seeking to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. Students are expected to participate in some area of ongoing research in the department, chosen with the help of their advisor. At the end of the term, students will present their results in a seminar to other students and faculty. (Same as ASTR 503 and PHSX 503.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics, or permission of instructor. IND
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An introduction to quantum mechanics, emphasizing a physical overview. Topics should include the formalisms of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the 3-dimensional Schrodinger equation with applications to the hydrogen atom; spin and angular momentum; multi-particle systems of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein particles; time-independent perturbation theory. (Same as PHSX 511.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 290. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing experimental techniques and data analysis, as well as scientific writing and presentation skills. Experiments will explore a range of classical and modern physics topics. (Same as PHSX 516.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, EPHX 316, and EPHX 521. (EPHX 521 may be taken concurrently.) LAB
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Applications of modern mathematical methods to problems in mechanics and modern physics. Techniques include application of partial differential equations and complex variables to classical field problems in continuous mechanics, unstable and chaotic systems, electrodynamics, hydrodynamics, and heat flow. Applications of elementary transformation theory and group theory, probability and statistics, and nonlinear analysis to selected problems in modern physics as well as to graphical representation of experimental data. Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320 or permission of instructor. (Same as PHSX 518.) LEC
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Newton's laws of motion. Motion of a particle in one, two, and three dimensions. Motion of a system of particles. Moving coordinate systems. (Same as PHSX 521.) Prerequisite: PHSX 211 or PHSX 213, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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The properties of electric and magnetic fields, including electrostatics, Gauss' Law, boundary value methods, electric fields in matter, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields in matter, the properties of electric and magnetic dipoles and of dielectric and magnetic materials. (Same as PHSX 531.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, PHSX 521 or special permission, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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A laboratory course that explores the theory and experimental techniques of analog and digital electronic circuit design and measurements. Topics include transient response, transmission lines, transistors, operational amplifiers, and digital logic. (Same as PHSX 536.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223 and MATH 290. PHSX 313 and 316 recommended. LEC
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Different topics will be covered as needed. This course will address topics in physics and astrophysics not covered in regularly offered courses. May be repeated if topic differs. (Same as PHSX 600.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing the application of physical principles to the design of systems for research, monitoring, or control. Topics include the use of microcomputers as controllers, interfacing microcomputers with measurement devices, and use of approximations and/or computer simulation to optimize design parameters, linear control systems, and noise. (Same as PHSX 601.) Prerequisite: Twelve hours of junior-senior credit in physics or engineering, including one laboratory course. LEC
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An introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of problems in physics for which simplifications allowing closed-form solutions are not applicable. Examples are drawn from mechanics, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and optics. (Same as PHSX 615.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, MATH 320 or equivalent, and EECS 138 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of PHSX 521. Lagrange's equations and generalized coordinates. Mechanics of continuous media. Tensor algebra and rotation of a rigid body. Special relativity and relativistic dynamics. (Same as PHSX 621.) Prerequisite: EPHX 521 or PHSX 521. LEC
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An introduction to basic fluid mechanics in which fundamental concepts and equations will be covered. Topics will include hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, wave propagation in fluids, and applications in the areas such as astrophysics, atmospheric physics, and geophysics. (Same as PHSX 623.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223, and MATH 290. LEC
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Maxwell's equations, wave propagation, optics and waveguides, radiation, relativistic transformations of fields and sources, use of covariance, and invariance of relativity. Normally a continuation of PHSX 531. (Same as PHSX 631.) Prerequisite: EPHX 531 or PHSX 531. LEC
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Experimental methods in nuclear physics, elementary concepts and simple considerations about nuclear forces, alpha and beta decay, gamma radiation, nuclear structure, and reaction systematics. (Same as PHSX 641.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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Geometric optics. Wave properties of light: interference, diffraction, coherence. Propagation of light through matter. Selected topics in modern optics, e.g., lasers, fibers. (Same as PHSX 655.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 316. LEC
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Properties and interactions of quarks, leptons, and other elementary particles; symmetry principles and conservation laws; broken symmetry; gauge bosons; the fundamental interactions, grand unified theories of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions; the cosmological implications of elementary particle physics. (Same as PHSX 661.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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Development of thermodynamics from statistical considerations. Elementary techniques of calculating thermodynamic properties of systems. Application to classical problems of thermodynamics. Elementary kinetic theory of transport processes. Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein systems. (Same as PHSX 671.) Prerequisite: EPHX 611. LEC
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Properties of common types of crystals and amorphous solids. Lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids. Electrons and holes in energy bands of metals, semiconductors, superconductors, and insulators. (Same as PHSX 681.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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An introduction to radiation processes, thermal processes, and radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and the interstellar medium. (Same as ASTR 691 and PHSX 691.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An overview of topics relevant to gravitation and modern cosmology: special relativity, tensor notation, the equivalence principle, the Schwarzchild solution, black holes, and Friedmann models. Cosmic black body radiation, dark matter, and the formation of large-scale structure. The idea of quantum gravity and an introduction to the current literature in cosmology. (Same as PHSX 693.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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Emergency ultrasound allows for rapid and accurate diagnostic information that can have significant benefits to patient outcomes. It involves performing and interpreting ultrasound at the patient's bedside and is used to rapidly triage, diagnose, and treat medical conditions in modern emergency departments around the country. This course will instruct students interested in Emergency Medicine in the skills necessary to perform and interpret point-of-care ultrasound examinations. Students will be expected to learn the basic principles of point of care ultrasound, to recognize the indications of point of care ultrasound, and also to develop proficiency in performance and interpretation of the basic point of care ultrasound examinations performed in the Emergency Department. CLN
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Individualized schedule of instruction in one or more skills at appropriate level(s) for students enrolling in AEC courses. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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An advanced listening course emphasizing pronunciation, fluency, comprehension and vocabulary development with a focus on college level content. Students work with and listen to lectures and interviews in order to build skills in understanding oral material, taking notes, discussing content, interviewing, summarizing, and giving presentations. Written work and analysis are also required. Five credits in the fall and spring semesters; three credits in the summer term. Prerequisite: Placement in this course by the Applied English Center. LEC
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