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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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An exploration of select areas in philosophy, such as emphasis on value-theory or epistemology or metaphysics, and their implications for educational theory. Normally a limited number of authors will also be selected for monographic treatment. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC
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An introduction to the foundations of and techniques associated with qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Additional topics include crafting qualitative research questions, ethics of fieldwork, and establishing trustworthiness of data. Common traditions of qualitative methods employed in education and other related fields will be introduced. LEC
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A survey of the history and development of the community/junior college. Particular emphasis will be given to the student, the faculty, the curricula, administration, and finance. The course is intended to provide a general understanding of the operation and concerns of today's community/junior college for the current or potential community/junior college staff member. LEC
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The purpose of this seminar is to explore leadership in education, particularly higher education, from a variety of perspectives. Readings come from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, such as sociology, organizational behavior, and psychology. We consider various aspects of leadership and analyze the leader from a symbolic perspective, as a manager of meaning and critical change agent. We then challenge ourselves to deconstruct our leadership realities with the help of several critical perspectives as we prepare to examine who the leaders are as well as who they will, and need to, be in the educational organizations of tomorrow. LEC
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The purpose of the course is to acquaint students in higher education, and students from other areas who intend to work in the post-secondary setting, with the history, philosophy and development of higher education in the United States. The course focuses on three periods: 1) the founding of Harvard to 1965; 2) dissent, disruption, and change, 1965-1979; and 3) the future and crucial issues, the 1980's. European higher education and its early influence on higher education in the United States is also examined. LEC
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The characteristics of college students; impact of college on student behavior, changing attitudes, values, beliefs, and the implications of recent research on traditional and new students for instructional and administrative practices. LEC
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Examination of the American college student from societal, development, research, and institutional perspectives and to review the policy implications of these findings for college and university administrators and faculty. Topics include research and theory concerning the college student experience, the diverse nature of the student body and its implications for institutional policy and practice, and formulation of individual philosophies and priorities applicable to working with college students. LEC
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Nature, objectives, and basic procedures of assessment and program evaluation as applied to the various aspects of higher education settings. In addition to basic procedures for evaluating programs, topics covered include accreditation, program review, benchmarking, student outcomes assessment, and evaluation of teaching in colleges and universities. Prerequisite: ELPS 715 or equivalent. LEC
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This course is required as a final course for all master's students in higher education. It is designed to prepare students for professional life after graduation. Using a case study approach, students will examine the reality of practice in a variety of higher educational settings including relevant political and ethical factors. Prerequisite: Higher education students in last semester of master's coursework. LEC
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Supervised and directed experiences to enhance the necessary leadership skills of a building/district leaders. Activities will include building/district level resource assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers/principals (and district level professionals), and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around responsibilities of curriculum, instruction, resource management and student achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of all certification program (MS/EdD) requirements for the Building/District Leadership Licenses. FLD
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The on site development of the skills necessary to effectively function as a school building leader. Activities will be tailored to the needs of individual students in consultation with a university advisor and a field advisor. FLD
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Prerequisite: Consent of advisor and instructor. IND
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This course is an introduction to methods of inquiry in education policy and leadership studies. It is designed to help doctoral students explore possible research interests, formulate research questions, and to review a rich variety of approaches to inquiry in the field of education. Specific topics include: interview- and observation-driven studies, ethnography, feminist and narrative methods, legal and historical methods, questionnaire-driven studies, quantitative evaluation studies, and studies using administrative and large national data sources. LEC
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An analysis of patterns of influence, organizations, and governmental agencies which impact education at the community, state and national levels. Particular emphasis is placed on analysis of policy development process and the relationship of policy to administration. Recommended to students in educational administration and higher education. LEC
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A study of the principles and techniques necessary for coordinating, monitoring, and improving the educational programs of elementary and secondary schools. LEC
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The objective of this course is to understand the financial systems and mechanisms used by states in the funding of elementary and secondary education in the United States. In simple language, we will be concerned with five basic issues: (1) Where the money comes from; (2) How it is redistributed; (3) How it is spent; (4) The relative effectiveness of spending decisions including selected international comparisons; and (5) How the previous four financial activities participate in a common financial ecology. The course provides an overview of theory and concepts central to the understanding of school finance with an emphasis on policy issues. It also examines the mechanics of school finance funding in light of state policies. LEC
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An in-depth study of theory and research in personnel administration. The focus will be on current literature dealing with empirical assessments of personnel theory and techniques. Specific concepts to be considered include the following: educator characteristics, job analysis and design, personnel recruitment, selection and evaluation techniques, staffing and development, and labor relations. Prerequisite: ELPS 753 or its equivalent. LEC
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This class is an overview of basic and advanced sociological and political theories of organization, with specific application to issues and problems in K-12 education. It is designed for graduate students and practicing educational leaders and administrators who intend to utilize research on organizations in their studies of the governance of schools, the sociology and politics of education, and education policy. The topics covered include the origins and nature of modern bureaucracy, formal structure and function, organizational control, transaction cost economics, population ecology, resource dependence, the new institutionalism, organizational effectiveness and legitimacy, organizational culture, power and politics, and change. LEC
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This course emphasizes skills for effective and efficient business and financial management of school districts in a Kansas or Missouri context. Basic topics include: Short range and long range financial planning, analysis of financial statements, budget preparation, fund accounting and financial reporting, contracting of services including transportation and food services, staff salaries and benefits and insurance. The course also includes a number of strategic methods for institutional planning including: Cost Benefit Analysis, Cost Effectiveness Analysis, and enrollment, revenue and expenditure forecasting techniques. Prerequisite: ELPS 952. LEC
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The focus of the course is the role of the public school district superintendent. Organized study will include assigned readings, lectures, guest speakers, discussion, and the completion of a study project. The course will include consideration of such topics as boardsmanship, community relations, district leadership, professional accountability, district maintenance and operations, professional employment and relationships with other agencies. The course is designed to serve the needs of those graduate students pursuing advanced study with the intention of completing requirements for district certification. Some students will also find the field appealing as an area for dissertation research. Prerequisite: Doctoral status in education administration or permission of instructor. LEC
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Course focuses on use of legal and moral reasoning in analysis of educational policy issues. Specific topics will vary depending on interests of instructor and students and current controversy. Examples of possible topics to be included: school desegregation, teacher collective bargaining, separation of church and school, equal educational opportunity. Prerequisite: ELPS 752, equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the origin, nature, and consequences of educational reform in the United States. The primary goal is to attain a balanced evaluation of current educational reform. LEC
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To aid administrators and prospective administrators responsible for organizing and administering programs of education for exceptional children, state and federal guidelines and regulations, legal aspects and financing of special education, planning a program, administering special services. (Same as SPED 971.) Prerequisite: Nine hours of Education including educational psychology and SPED 725. LEC
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A survey of the theoretical and empirical literature in educational administration and the methods used to investigate these content areas. Major emphasis is devoted to developing research skills applicable in practice and to the identification of possible generic topics suitable for future dissertation work. LEC
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A factual, descriptive, and analytical study of national systems of formal education, or schooling, as exemplified in contemporary educational establishments. Organizational and administrative policies and teaching practices, with emphasis on Germany, France, England, U.S.S.R., People's Republic of China and Japan. Other nations may be examined on an individual project basis. The difference between ELPS 971 and ELPS 772 is the philosophical emphasis of the latter. LEC
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Designed to meet the needs of students majoring in Latin American studies or interested in the area. Development of an awareness of the concept of cross-cultural confluence with Latin America as it relates to education. Survey of the main problems confronted by Latin American educational systems and examination of the difficulties experienced by North American educators when confronted with such problems. LEC
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This is an interdisciplinary course designed to provide an opportunity to read, reflect upon, and discuss ideas drawn from the emerging field of Science and Technology Studies (STS) in connection with education. STS scholars study the social, cultural, and institutional context of science and technology using perspectives and methods derived from the social sciences and the humanities. The focus of this course is on the interrelationships between technology, society, and education (defined broadly to include non-school and adult learning settings). There currently is no course addressing these issues in the program (or the School of Education). A key issue to be explored concerns the question of how knowledge, expertise, and authority are constructed within and across social and cultural groups, with particular attention to social and economic inequality. Another issue for investigation concerns the relationship between emerging technologies and the nature of "the self" in society. The class will be conducted as a doctoral level seminar, primarily serving students from the Educational Technology, Foundations and Policy Studies concentrations. Prerequisite: Admission to ELPS doctoral program, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed for advanced doctoral students in higher education, particularly those who will be preparing unit budgets or budget presentations and those who make and implement fiscal policy (e.g., financial aid offers). The course material covers different types of college and university budgeting -- incremental, zero-based and formula -- and their impact on university revenues; statewide coordination and its impact on programs, program duplication and funding; retrenchment and quality issues; the legislative role in budget preparation; unified and comparative management systems (e.g., WICHE and NCHEMS); and the impact of federal contracting and student aid policies. LEC
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An overview of the developing law of higher education, with emphasis on and analysis of employer-employee relationships, student-faculty/administration relationships, and the impact of federal and state regulation on these relationships. LEC
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This course considers the role and circumstances of faculty in higher education including variations among different types of institutions. Topics include the history and demographics of the professoriate, the academic work environment and labor market, the role of faculty in institutional governance and policy making, and the social and political context of academia. LEC
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A study of contemporary post-secondary curriculum with particular emphasis on the nature of curriculum, the organization and structure of academic programs, the nature of change in academic communities and exemplary innovative institutions. LEC
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A study of the development, issues, and programs for the preparation of teachers. Open to all regular graduate students. LEC
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Nature, objectives, and basic procedures of evaluation as applied to the various aspects of higher education. Open to all regular graduate students. LEC
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A theory-based course aimed at providing an understanding of the governance and administration of academic institutions -- particularly universities. Emphasis is directed toward an analysis of decision-making in these complex organizations. LEC
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Supervised and directed experiences to enhance the necessary leadership skills of a building/district leaders. Activities will include building/district level resource assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers/principals (and district level professionals), and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around responsibilities of curriculum, instruction, resource management and student achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of all certification program (MS/EdD) requirements for the Building/District Leadership Licenses. FLD
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC
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Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The advisor will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experience will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agencies, and the advisor. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD
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To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester-long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the advisor and/or the member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD
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Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH
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A study of the principles used by the engineer in managing a technology-based enterprise. Topics include planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in an engineering curriculum or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Advanced or experimental work of a specialized nature representing unique or changing needs and resources in engineering management. RSH
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This course is intended to introduce the student to the basic concepts of management and motivation for the engineering manager and general behavior of technical organizations. This course presents a history of the schools of management thought through the modern research that began the participative management movement. The course will investigate classical motivational theories and management style principles. The student will perform research to determine how their employer or clients apply these theories. LEC
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Applied statistical methods to engineering systems will be introduced in this course for analyzing engineering and management systems. Emphasis will be given to applied regression analysis, analysis of variance, analysis of time dependence by smoothing, Bayes method, time series analysis, auto-regressive moving averages and forecasting model. Prerequisite: Skills in probability, statistics, and computer application. LEC
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This course focuses on the impact of technology on society. Techniques of technology forecasting such as Delphi, cross-impact analysis, trend projection, decision trees, and scenarios are discussed. Case studies of technology assessments are presented. Each student is asked to conduct a preliminary technology assessment which is a systematic study of the effects on society which may occur when a technology is introduced or modified. Prerequisite: Elementary skills in statistics, computer programming, and linear algebra. LEC
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Principles and theories of business development and marketing as applicable to professional engineering and architectural practices. LEC
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Management of technology and technological change through innovation, imitation, and obsolescence; planning, organizing, motivation, and control for innovation; organizational climate and its effects on innovative ideas and entrepreneurship; project/product decisions and R&D strategies in small and large companies; innovation in multinational corporations. LEC
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A study of finance including financial planning and management in technological based organizations. Topics covered include financial statement analysis, present value of financial markets, capital budgeting, taxes, investment decisions, replacement decisions, cash flow budgets, and sources of capital. LEC
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This course is an introduction to labor relations and human resources, including employment practices in unionized and non-union organizations. The course will examine labor relations, human relations and collective bargaining with emphasis on the negotiation and administration of labor agreements. Included will be a survey of the historical, legal, and structural environments that influence the collective bargaining process. Research topics focus on some of the most important issues in the workplace: protecting jobs, increasing productivity, computerization, worker participation, expanding and declining labor markets, and new methods of decision making in the human resources field. LEC
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The overwhelming challenge that faces the U.S. today is the need to regain its competitive position in the world marketplace. This course offers a broad view of Quality Management in that it focuses on the managerial aspects of quality, rather than just the technical. For example, students will learn the Malcolm Baldridge award criteria which focuses on leadership, data analysis, human resources, quality assurance, quality results, and customer satisfaction. In addition, a review of the theory and approaches of the major quality leaders such as Deming, Juran, and Crosby will be covered. Practical applications of TQM concepts in a technological environment will be stressed throughout the course. LEC
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Includes the study of theories, tests for, and objectives of engineering and management ethics. Explores personal values. Measures personality profile and preferred communication style for each student. Includes management of stress, time, and career. Each student prepares career and personal development plans. Managerial writing and communication skills are developed through weekly projects including report and proposal preparation, internal correspondence concerning praise and reprimand, and organizational policy preparation. Interpersonal and nonverbal communication styles are studied. Relies heavily on instructor-assisted peer mediation of topics after introduction of constructive techniques of interpersonal communication. LEC
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This course emphasizes the use of general system theory, classical optimization and optimality conditions, model development, and theory and application of mathematical programming, to include: linear programming, dynamic programming, queuing models, integer and non-linear programming, and introduction to decision analysis. Prerequisite: Elementary skills in linear algebra, probability, calculus, and computer application. LEC
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Methods of developing, implementing, and using computer simulations for management processes such as inventory control, waiting lines, project monitoring, and capital investment decisions are covered. Extensive use is made of simulation languages and interactive graphic-supported gaming and decision analysis. Engineering systems and chemical processes are studied under deterministic and stochastic conditions. Two hours lecture, three hours laboratory per week. LEC
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This course covers: legal doctrines relating to owners, design professionals, and contractors; sources of law, forms of association, and agency; contracts, including formation, rights and duties, interpretation, performance problems, disputes, and claims; standards of care and the management of construction claims; duties and obligations of the design professional, the owner, and the contractor; surety bonds and insurance. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in engineering or architecture. LEC
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Includes planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling design projects. Treats those topics from viewpoints of profit, cost control, client satisfaction, and project team human relations. Also covers delegation, motivation, team building, performance reviews, conflict resolution, and group dynamics. Presents the project manager's job from an augmented model of the Blake-Mouton grid. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in engineering or architecture. LEC
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The elements of the accounting cycle are defined so as to help the student understand the process from the balance sheet for the last period through the journal, ledger, income statement, trial balance and an adjusted balance for the current period. There is a heavy emphasis on the definition and significance of accounting terminology. The communication interfaces between engineering managers and the controller's office are examined as are recent developments in cost accounting. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in architectural, construction, engineering or technology management, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of the economic feasibility of competing engineering projects including the application of break-even analysis, decisions under uncertainty, decision trees, stochastic models, risk vs. return, and forecasting. A study of the financial figures of merit used to evaluate competing engineering projects including the DuPont rate of return method, the accounting rate of return, the operating return method, return on equity, earnings per share, margin on sales, selling price of stock, corporate credit rating, total sales, market share, market entry, and proforma year-end statements. A study of the strategic evaluation of a project including the proposed product or service, the organization, the environment, and the venture in general. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.S. Engineering Management program or consent of instructor, EMGT 806, a course in applied statistics. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to all aspects of managing a project within a company or organization. The entire project life cycle will be covered from inception to close-out, and many practical considerations will be discussed including material procurement, working with contractors and consultants, selecting software, and managing the project team. The course will focus on how to manage project scope, schedule budget, and resources using personal computer software. A semester project is required presenting an example of project management or investigating some aspect of project management in detail. LEC
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Basic principles of marketing as applicable to engineering managers in the production- or operations-based enterprise. Includes a broad overview of the major components of marketing (competition, product, price, promotion, and distribution). Also details the integration of those components into the marketing plan. The students will develop a group marketing plan for an agreed-upon product. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate program in engineering or Pittsburgh State's technology management program. LEC
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A capstone course for the program which provides an integration of the material presented in the other courses through the utilization of several engineering management case studies. Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 21 credit hours in the Engineering Management program. LEC
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A problem in engineering management, the satisfactory completion of which satisfies the project requirement for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering Management. THE
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This is a first course at the graduate level introducing the formal methods and processes in bringing complex systems into being and improving existing systems. Systems include both products and services. Emphasis is placed on: the definition of customer needs, the entire life cycle of systems, and introduction to formal specification methods, the value to cost ratio and the management of the systems engineering process. LEC
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This course investigates the area of managing software development and presents the management process as a means of optimizing business considerations and project demands. Uncertainties in product/service specifications, technology risks, cost and delivery requirements impact the management functions. Cost and schedule estimation techniques are presented together with project planning, risk control and measurement technologies. The techniques presented in this course are directly applicable to management in other industry segments. Guest speakers are used to demonstrate applications in this course. LEC
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This course is intended to bring the student up to date on developments in the field of information technology (IT) and to prepare the student to apply those technologies in the workplace. To this end, the course is divided into two components. First, current hardware, software, and networking technologies will be presented. Topics include relational databases, object oriented design and programming, client-server technologies, the Internet, and emerging communication technologies. Second, approaches to evaluating and implementing the range of information technology alternatives available to business will be presented. Topics in this area include software development, management and evaluation, IT project management, information integrity and security, and the effects of IT on people and the organization. LEC
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This course provides a survey of the environmental regulations, environmental problems, and environmental solutions that must be dealt with by engineering managers regardless of their function or industry. A historical perspective on the environment is presented followed by discussion of pollution generation (sources), transportation, fate, and effects. The quantity and quality of various types of pollutants emitted to various media and the risk posed by these pollutants is analyzed. The regulatory process is examined from the perspective of the legislator, the regulator, the regulated, the engineer, and the public. LEC
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Management of competitive intelligence and security in business strategic planning is a first course at the graduate level that introduces the formal methods, concepts, and processes of competitive intelligence and security which are vital to both strategic business planning and day-to-day business operations. This course provides access to the tools used to identify what is happening in the business environment including legislation, economics, regulatory changes, competition, customers, etc. that affect a business' strategy and operations. Further, these tools are applied to determining what will likely happen in the future and how to use those forecasts to optimize strategic and operational plans. LEC
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Graduate-level investigation requiring original, independent research on problems or subjects of immediate interest to a student or faculty member. Intended to develop a student's capability in coordinating two or more of the following: technology, finance, economics, applied mathematics, and managerial communication. EMGT 860 may be repeated for credit to a maximum of four hours in the degree program. Prerequisite: Approval of an outline of the proposed project by the instructor and the program director. RSH
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This course develops the rationale and need for the integration of manufacturing systems, and deals with the multitude of practical problems involved with manufacturing systems integration. Topics covered include intelligent manufacturing subsystems and vendor-specific islands of automation, on-line and off-line information sources, and end users of information in the manufacturing enterprise. Engineering details covered include the types of communication links available between systems, communication standards, network and protocol alternatives, and hardware platform alternatives. Management concepts covered include the top-down design/bottom-up implementation approach to system integration, long-range planning and management of integration projects, reliability and security issues, and human factors. LEC
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This course provides the student with up-to-date information of the management of manufacturing operations. Emphasis is on quantitative methods for designing and analyzing manufacturing processes, simulation of manufacturing processes, and recent paradigms in manufacturing including just-in-time production, synchronous manufacturing, and agile manufacturing. A semester project is required covering some aspect of operations management in detail. LEC
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A review of the basic skills of written English, with emphasis on sentence-level grammar. Recommended for all students who score 16 or below on the ACT English test. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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Instruction and practice in writing in a variety of rhetorical contexts, including academic ones. LEC
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Builds upon the instruction in writing of ENGL 101, emphasizing critical thinking through careful, thoughtful reading and writing. Also instructs in the evaluation and use of secondary sources. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 or its equivalent, or an ACT score of 27-31, or an SAT score of 600-649, or an AP exam score of 3 on either the Literature and Composition exam or the Language and Composition exam, or an IB score of 5. LEC
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Study of significant works of world literature. The primary aims are to develop reading and writing skills and to introduce the students to works of literature drawn from a variety of genres and historical periods. Prerequisite: An ACT score of 32-36, or an SAT score of 650 or higher, or an AP exam score of 3 on either the Literature and Composition exam or the Language and Composition exam, or membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in English. Coursework is completed through a KU study abroad program. Available only to KU study abroad participants. May be repeated for credit if content varies. Does NOT fulfill any part of the Freshman-Sophomore requirement. LEC
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In-depth reading and writing on a significant topic, theme, or genre. Includes a variety of textual types or a range of historical periods. Continued practice in critical reading and writing. May include but will not be limited to writing in literary genres. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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Study of a major movement, topic, or theme in literature and culture. The primary aims are to further develop reading and writing skills and to consider significant cultural and artistic issues. Prerequisite: ENGL 105 or an AP exam score of 4 on either the Literature and Composition exam or the Language and Composition exam. LEC
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In-depth reading of and writing about prose fiction with emphasis on critical analysis of a variety of narrative types from different historical periods. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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In-depth reading of and writing about poetry with emphasis on critical analysis of a variety of forms and techniques used in poems from different historical periods. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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Study of plays selected to familiarize the student with dramatic masterpieces and with the drama as a literary type. Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 101 and ENGL 102, or their equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the nature and function of literature, emphasizing Biblical, Classical, and other major cultural traditions and their influence on British and American literature. Some ancient and modern works will be studied in conjunction. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of British literary works before 1800. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, topic, historical period, author, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the first-and-second year English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of British literary works since 1800. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, topic, historical period, author, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the first-and-second year English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. (Same as ISP 305.) LEC
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Study of significant problems in literary interpretation and methodology, in which basic critical principles and approaches are systematically examined and applied. These approaches might include, but are not limited to, feminism, Marxism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of five or more significant novels representative of developments in the British novel of the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Outstanding works of British literature, from the earliest times to the close of the eighteenth century, studied in chronological sequence and with some attention to the characteristics of the various periods of English literary history embraced. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Outstanding works of British literature, from 1800 to the present, studied in chronological sequence and with some attention to the characteristics of the various periods of English literary history embraced. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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For students enrolled in the annual summer Study Abroad program, an interdisciplinary program conducted with other humanities departments. British literature is studied in the context of visits to relevant sites such as London, the Lake District, and Edinburgh. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement; approval for enrollment in the Summer Institute through the Study Abroad office. LEC
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Outstanding works of American literature, studied in chronological sequence and with some attention paid to the characteristics of the various periods of American literary history embraced. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of American literary works before 1865. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, topic, historical period, author, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the first-and-second year English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of American literary works since 1865. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period, author, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the first-and-second year English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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From the beginnings to 1865, with emphasis on the major writers and movements. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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From 1865 to the present, with emphasis on the major writers and movements. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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The study of British and American literature, emphasizing important figures and movements since World War I. On occasion, the study of literature will be enriched with an investigation of other arts, such as music, film, and painting. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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Study of one or more recent British and/or American authors. (Different authors in different semesters.) May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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