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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Finite and divided differences. Interpolation, numerical differentiation, and integration. Gaussian quadrature. Numerical integration of ordinary differential equations. Curve fitting. (Same as MATH 781.) Prerequisite: MATH 320 and knowledge of a programming language. LEC
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Direct and interactive methods for solving systems of linear equations. Numerical solution of partial differential equations. Numerical determination of eigenvectors and eigenvalues. Solution of nonlinear equations. (Same as MATH 782). Prerequisite: EECS 781. LEC
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Advanced courses on special topics of current interest in electrical engineering, computer engineering, or computer science, given as the need arises. May be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: Variable. LEC
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Graduate level directed readings on a topic in electrical engineering, computer engineering, or computer science, mutually agreed-on by the student and instructor. May be repeated for credit on another topic. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A colloquium/seminar series in which presentation are provided on a broad variety of scholarly and professional topics. Topics related to the issues of responsible scholarship in the fields of computing and electrical engineering will be discussed. Student are also required to attend a series of colloquia and submit written reports. Course will be graded Satisfactory/Fail and is required for all EECS graduate students. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the EECS Department. LEC
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Principal concepts in software engineering with a focus on formalism as well as managerial issues; software development models; software process models; software configuration management; software development life cycle activities; project management; planning and estimation; requirements engineering, software architecture, software modular design; software reusability; implementation strategies; testing techniques; software quality assurance; software evolution; metrics and measurements, ethics and professionalism. Prerequisite: Programming experience, preferably in Java or C++. LEC
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Management issues in the creation, development, and maintenance of IT systems; effort and cost estimation techniques; project planning and scheduling; resource allocation; risk analysis and mitigation techniques; quality assurance; project administration; configuration management; organizational issues; software process modeling; process improvement; frameworks for quality software. LEC
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Objectives, processes, and activities of requirements engineering and requirements management; characteristics of good requirements; types of requirements; managing changing requirements; languages, notations, and methodologies; formal and semi-formal methods of presenting and validating the requirements; requirements standards; traceability issues. Prerequisite: EECS 810. LEC
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Software quality engineering as an integral facet of development from requirements through delivery and maintenance; verification and validation techniques; manual and automated static analysis techniques; fundamental concepts in software testing; test case selection strategies such as black-box testing, white-box testing; formal verification; unit, integration, system, and acceptance testing; regression testing; designing for testability; models for quality assurance; reviews, inspection, documentation, and standards; industry and government standards for quality. Prerequisite: EECS 810. LEC
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Abstract data types, objects and classes, class associations, modeling with objects, domain modeling, use case modeling, interactive and incremental development, object-oriented analysis and design, components, frameworks, UML and Unified Process, reusability, design patterns, object management, and CORBA. Prerequisite: EECS 810. LEC
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Designing architectures; software architectural styles and patterns; architectural components and connectors; architectural modeling and analysis, architectural deployment, designing for nonfunctional properties such as efficiency, scaleability, adaptability, and security; domainspecificsoftware architectures; architecture product lines; architecture description languages (ADLs); standards. Prerequisite: EECS 810. LEC
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Introduction to the mathematical background, basic concepts, components, and protocols to enforce secrecy, integrity, and privacy through cryptographic mechanisms. The concept of symmetric and asymmetric encryption, integrity verification, authentication, key establishment and update, and authorization. Emphasis on the design of protocols that apply and integrate various modules to achieve safety objectives: time-stamping, digital signature, bit commitment, fair coin-flip, zero knowledge proof, oblivious transfer, and digital cash. The policies for key generation and management, information storage and access control, legal issues, and design of protocols for real applications. Prerequisite: EECS 268, EECS 563 or EECS 780 and Linear Algebra. LEC
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Description and analysis of basic microwave remote sensing systems including radars and radiometers as well as the scattering and emission properties of natural targets. Topics covered include plane wave propagation, antennas, radiometers, atmospheric effects, radars, calibrated systems, and remote sensing applications. Prerequisite: EECS 420 and EECS 622. LEC
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Description and analysis of basic microwave remote sensing systems including radars and radiometers as well as the scattering and emission properties of natural targets. Topics covered include measurement and discrimination, real-aperture side-looking airborne radars, synthetic-aperture side-looking airborne radar systems, scattering measurements, physical mechanisms and empirical models for scattering and emission. Prerequisite: EECS 823. LEC
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Description and analysis of radars of various types. Resolution in angle, range, and speed. Ambiguities. Return from point and area targets. Detection in the presence of noise and fading. Tracking and MTI. Amplitude measurement. Imaging radars. Prerequisite: EECS 360, EECS 420, and EECS 461. LEC
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An advanced course in fiber-optic communications. The course will focus on various important aspects and applications of modern fiber-optic communications, ranging from photonic devices to systems and networks. Topics include: advanced semiconductor laser devices, external optical modulators, optical amplifiers, optical fiber nonlinearities and their impact in WDM and TDM optical systems, polarization effect in fiber-optic systems, optical receivers and high-speed optical system performance evaluation, optical solution systems, lightwave analog video transmission, SONET & ATM optical networking, and advanced multi-access lightwave networks. Prerequisite: EECS 628 or equivalent. LEC
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A detailed examination of computer programs and techniques that manifest intelligent behavior, with examples drawn from current literature. The nature of intelligence and intelligent behavior. Development of, improvement to, extension of, and generalization from artificially intelligent systems, such as theorem-provers, pattern recognizers, language analyzers, problem-solvers, question answerers, decision-makers, planners, and learners. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the EECS department or Cognitive Science or permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to systems biology. It covers computational analysis of biological systems with a focus on computational tools and databases. Topics include: basic cell biology, cancer gene annotation, micro RNA identification, Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis, genetic marker identification, protein-DNA interaction, computational Neurology, vaccine design, cancer drug development, and computational development biology. Prerequisite: Introduction to Bioinformatics equivalent to EECS 730, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Fundamental theory of adaptive systems. Evolution of artificial neural networks and training algorithms. Pattern classification, function approximation, and system optimization. Introduction to fuzzy set theory and neuro-fuzzy models for pattern classification. Application of neural networks in signal and image processing problems. Pattern classification for biological systems. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in the EECS department or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course emphasizes the applications of computational algorithms to main problems in protein bioinformatics and molecular biology. A variety of topics, including protein sequence alignments, profiles and protein structure classification and prediction, will be either introduced briefly or discussed in detail. Students will be asked to present some selected research papers. Prerequisite: EECS 730. LEC
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Extracting data from data bases to data warehouses. Preprocessing of data: handling incomplete, uncertain, and vague data sets. Discretization methods. Methodology of learning from examples: rules of generalization, control strategies. Typical learning systems: ID3, AQ, C4.5, and LERS. Validation of knowledge. Visualization of knowledge bases. Data mining under uncertainty, using approaches based on probability theory, fuzzy set theory, and rough set theory. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in CS or CoE or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is introduction to the application of machine learning methods in bioinformatics. Major subjects include: biological sequence analysis, microarray interpretation, protein interaction analysis, and biological network analysis. Common biological and biomedical data types and related databases will also be introduced. Students will be asked to present some selected research papers. Prerequisite: EECS 730 and EECS 738. LEC
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Problems associated with mining incomplete and numerical data. The MLEM2 algorithm for rule induction directly from incomplete and numerical data. Association analysis and the Apriori algorithm. KNN and other statistical methods. Mining financial data sets. Problems associated with imbalanced data sets and temporal data. Mining medical and biological data sets. Induction of rule generations. Validation of data mining: sensitivity, specificity, and ROC analysis. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in CS or CoE or consent of instructor. LEC
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The objective of this course is to give students a hands on introduction to the fundamentals of computer vision. Topics include: Image Formation, Image Segmentation, Binary Image Analysis, Edge Detection, Line Drawing Interpretation, Shape from Shading, Motion Analysis, Stereo, Shape Representation, and Object Recognition. The objective of this course is to give students a hands-on introduction to the fundamentals of computer vision. Prerequisite: EECS 740 or equivalent. LEC
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This course presents advanced topics in programming language semantics. Fixed point types are presented followed by classes of polymorphism and their semantics. System F and type variables are presented along with universal and existential types. The lambda cube is introduced along with advanced forms of polymorphism. Several interpreters are developed implementing various type systems and associated type inference algorithms. Prerequisite: EECS 762. LEC
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This course presents the theory and application of adaptive signal processing. Topics include adaptive filtering, mathematics for advanced signal processing, cost function modeling and optimization, signal processing algorithms for optimum filtering, array processing, linear prediction, interference cancellation, power spectrum estimation, steepest descent, and iterative algorithms. Prerequisite: EECS 861 and background in fundamental signal processing (such as EECS 644.) LEC
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Processing requirements for integrated networks and associated applications. Principles of VLSI architectures. Overview of selected network functions, including scrambling and descrambling, synchronization, cell switching, routing, bandwidth shaping and policing, encryption, and decryption. Implementation of network functions using high performance special-purpose architectures. Examples of processors for high speed networks. Prerequisite: EECS 546 and EECS 663. Corequisite: EECS 863. LEC
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Fundamental concepts in random variables, random process models, power spectral density. Application of random process models in the analysis and design of signal processing systems, communication systems and networks. Emphasis on signal detection, estimation, and analysis of queues. This course is a prerequisite for most of the graduate level courses in radar signal processing, communication systems and networks. Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in probability and statistics, and signal processing. LEC
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A study of communication systems using noisy channels. Principal topics are: information and channel capacity, baseband data transmission, digital carrier modulation, error control coding, and digital transmission of analog signals. The course includes a laboratory/computer aided design component integrated into the study of digital communication systems. Prerequisite: EECS 562. Corequisite: EECS 861. LEC
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Modeling and analysis for performance prediction of communication networks. Topics include: an introduction to queueing theory; analysis of TDM systems; modeling and analysis of networks of queues; analysis of congestion and flow control algorithms; analysis of routing algorithms; analysis of bus and ring networks. Prerequisite: EECS 861. LEC
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Introduce methodologies for multiwavelength optical network analysis, design, control, and survivability. Prerequisite: EECS 663. LEC
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The theory and practice of the engineering of wireless telecommunication systems. Topics include cellular principles, mobile radio propagation (including indoor and outdoor channels), radio link calculations, fading (including Rayleigh, Rician, and other models), packet radio, equalization, diversity, error correction coding, spread spectrum, multiple access techniques (including time, frequency, and code), and wireless networking. Current topics of interest will be covered. Corequisite: EECS 861. LEC
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Statistical approaches to processing natural language text have become dominant in recent years. This course is introduction to statistical natural language processing (NLP). The course covers the theory and algorithms needed for building NLP tools. It provides broad but rigorous coverage of mathematical and linguistic foundations, as well as detailed discussion of statistical methods, allowing students to construct their own implementations. Topics include: word sense disambiguation, clustering, text classification, information retrieval, and other applications. Prerequisite: Fluency in programming and knowledge of basic statistics and probability. LEC
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A study of communication channels and the coding problem. An introduction to finite fields and linear block codes such as cyclic, Hamming, Golay, BCH, and Reed-Solomon. Convolutional codes and the Viberbi algorithm are also covered. Other topics include trellis coded modulation, iterative (turbo) codes, LDPC codes. Prerequisite: EECS: 562 or equivalent. LEC
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Topics may include: type classes; concurrency and STMs; the IO and ST monads; template Haskell and quasi-quoting; precise data structures; tools and testing support; generics; grammarware and parsing; operational Haskell; compiling functional languages; correctness by construction' GADTs and dependent types; Rank-2 polymorphism and Rank-n polymorphism. Prerequisite: EECS 776 or equivalent or consent of instructor. LEC
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Comprehensive coverage of the discipline of high-bandwith low-latency networks and communication, including high bandwidth-x-delay products, with an emphasis on principles, architecture, protocols, and system design. Topics include high-performance network architecture, control, and signalling; high-speed wired, optical, and wireless links; fast packet, IP, and optical switching; IP lookup, classification, and scheduling; network processors, end system design and protocol optimization, network interfaces; storage networks; end-to-end protocols, mechanisms, and optimizations; and high-bandwidth low-latency applications. Principles will be illustrated with many leading-edge and emerging protocols and architectures. Prerequisite: EECS 563 or EECS 780, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Comprehensive coverage of the disciplines of mobile and wireless networking, with an emphasis on architecture and protocols. Topics include cellular telephony, MAC algorithms, wireless PANs, LANs, MANs, and WANs; wireless and mobile Internet; mobile ad hoc networking; mobility management, sensor networks; satellite networks; and ubiquitous computing. Prerequisite: EECS 563 or EECS 780, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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A detailed study of routing in IP networks. Topics include evolution of the Internet architecture, IP services and network characteristics, an overview of routing protocols, the details of common interior routing protocols and interdomain routing protocols, and the relationship between routing protocols and the implementation of policy. Issues will be illustrated through laboratories based on common routing platforms. Prerequisite: EECS 745. LEC
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Directed studies of advanced phases of electrical engineering, computer engineering, computer science or information technology not covered in regular graduate courses, including advanced laboratory work, special research, or library reading. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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Group discussions of selected topics and reports on the progress of original investigations. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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A theorem based treatment of electromagnetic theory, with applications. Topics include source modeling, equivalence concepts, Green's functions, construction of solutions, and integral equations. Applications include scattering and electromagnetic numerical techniques. Prerequisite: EECS 720 or equivalent. LEC
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Polarimetric plane-wave propagation, including the complex propagation matrix and Stokes vector representation. Electromagnetic scattering, including the scattering matrix, Mueller matrix, scattering cross-section, absorption cross-section, extinction cross-section, Mie scattering, and Rayleigh scattering. Volume scattering in random media, including the Born approximation, Rayleigh scattering statistics, multiple scattering mechanisms, Radiative transfer theory, and volume scattering above a dielectric half-space. Propagation through random media, including the extinction coefficient, the optical theorem, and the distorted Born approximation. Scattering from rough surfaces, including the Kirchoff, Physical Optics and small-perturbation models. Prerequisite: EECS 720. LEC
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A review of statistical and mathematical principles that are utilized in data mining and machine learning research. Covered topics include asymptotic analysis of parameter estimation, sufficient statistics, model selection, information geometry, function approximation and Hilbert spaces. Prerequisite: EECS 738, EECS 837, EECS 844 or equivalent. LEC
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This course presents the mathematical basis for software that is correct-by-construction. Students will learn basic mathematical techniques for representing, composing and refining software specifications and how they are realized in software systems. Prerequisite: EECS 762 or EECS 755. LEC
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Detection of signals in the presence of noise and estimation of signal parameters. Narrowband signals, multiple observations, signal detectability and sequential detection. Theoretical structure and performance of the receiver. Prerequisite: EECS 861. LEC
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A mathematical study of the minimization (or maximization) of functions. The course provides an introduction to the mathematical theory and application of a variety of optimization techniques, with an emphasis on applications related to communication systems. Optimization problem formulation. Unconstrained and constrained minimization, including conditions for optimal points. Specific techniques for solving linear and nonlinear programming problems. Convergence of algorithms. LEC
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Graduate research seminar that provides an overview of the emerging field of resilient, survivable, disruption-tolerant, and challenged networks. These networks aim to remain operational and provide an acceptable level of service in the face of a number of challenges including: natural faults of network components; failures due to misconfiguration or operational errors; attacks against the network hardware, software, or protocol infrastructure; large-scale natural disasters; unpredictably long delay paths either due to length (e.g. satellite and interplanetary) or as a result of episodic connectivity; weak and episodic connectivity and asymmetry of wireless channels; high-mobility of nodes and subnetworks; unusual traffic load (e.g. flash crowds). Multi-level solutions that span all protocol layers, planes, and parts of the network will be systemically and systematically covered. In addition to lectures, students read and present summaries of research papers and execute a project. Prerequisite: EECS 780; previous experience in simulation desirable. LEC
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This course is designed to increase the students' awareness of learning in the classroom and to familiarize them with the role of the school and the community. Institutions and resources that support children and families will be addressed through large and small group sessions and field experiences. Emphasis is given to the diverse nature of schools, communities, and their populations. In addition, the course will acclimate students with the School of Education programs, admissions procedures, and curriculum offerings. Successful completion of this course does not guarantee eventual admission of the School of Education's Teacher Education Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of C&T 100. LEC
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This course provides students with an introduction to key ideas and socio- historical forces that have shaped the contemporary educational system in the United States, drawing upon the disciplines of the historical, philosophical, and social foundations of education. The development of school and community relations will be a point of emphasis. LEC
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The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to elementary and middle school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC
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The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to middle school and high school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC
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A historical approach to the major social and philosophical foundations of American education, with an emphasis on the relation of educational theory to classroom practice. LEC
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Supervised field experience in an on-site educational setting that provides the student an opportunity to study and participate in the professional activities of a designated educational setting with emphasis on the planning, implementation, and evaluation of such activities. Regular conferences with faculty to evaluate student progress will be scheduled. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-certificate baccalaureate program. LEC
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Supervised field experience in an on-site educational setting with increasing emphasis placed on an integration of formal learning and in site experience. Regular conferences with faculty will be scheduled. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-certificate baccalaureate program. FLD
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Only one enrollment permitted each semester. A maximum of four hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Recommendation of advisor and consent of instructor. IND
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A study of the changing role and character of childhood and youth as stages of life in the context of American educational and cultural history. LEC
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education students, primarily for undergraduates. LEC
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This special course of study in residential staff skill enhancement and administration is an exploration of concepts and skills necessary for becoming an effective paraprofessional staff member in a residential living unit. Each class session will include presentations and experiential learning on topics to develop or improve interpersonal skills and skill in dealing with special concerns. The course is required or recommended for all residence and scholarship hall staff and open to upperclass or graduate students interested in student personnel work. LEC
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This course introduces the concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in education and related areas. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. Students should expect to study much of this material in greater depth through additional course work before being prepared to conduct independent research. However, this course should enhance their ability to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research artilces and reports. Topics in the course include quantitative and qualitative methods and designs, historical and descriptive research, and program evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate standing in the School of Education. LEC
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This course provides the prospective teacher with an overview of the following topics: 1) The role of various levels of government in controlling schools, 2) the composition and functioning of school boards, 3) the way schools are funded, 4) the laws affecting school operations and teachers' jobs, 5) the ethical responsibilities of teachers, 6) the role of teacher unions and associations, and 7) the terms of teachers' employment. LEC
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An introduction to the role, responsibilities, expectations and major duties of elementary, middle, and high school building administrators. Students are presented typical problems faced by school administrators through simulations and role playing and are expected, through reflection and discussion, to develop viable solutions. LEC
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A description and analysis of national, state, and local strategies for the financial support of education, utilizing social, economic, legal, and political frameworks. Particular attention to the principles of revenue acquisition and distribution at the local and state level for public school operations, with analysis of how these principles apply to Kansas. Designed for the wide variety of educational practitioners regardless of organizational and degree levels. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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A study of legal principles and issues affecting educational policy making and practice with emphasis on student and teacher rights, equity, and the administration of schools. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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An overview of the theory and practice of personnel administration. The course focuses on the processes of recruitment, selection, training and development, evaluation, compensation, equal employment opportunity, and labor relations. LEC
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An introduction to various methods of problem identification; strategies of information gathering; schemes for the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data; models of problem resolution and decision making; and communication methods appropriate for differing audiences. Students will build basic computer, library, decision and communication skills useful in future administrative practice and subsequent coursework. LEC
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An overview of the theory and practice of the management, recruitment, selection, compensation, placement, and development of personnel in the school setting. LEC
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A study of the roles and goals of education in the United States, the interrelationships among schools and students, teachers, administrators, and parents, and the culture of schools. LEC
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This course focuses on strategies for integrating educational technology in K-12 schools, universities, government or industry. Topics include applying technology in: a) understanding basic technology operations b) planning and designing learning experiences, c) curriculum development, d) assessment and evaluation e) productivity and professional practices, and considering f) social, ethical, legal, and human issues. Students produce a comprehensive electronic portfolio that describes the theoretical perspectives that guide their technology integrations strategies and evidence that demonstrates their competencies. LEC
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A study of significant philosophical problems encountered when comparing educational systems. Special emphasis on the implications of axiological analysis for educational theory and practice in different areas of the world. Relationships among the social sciences, philosophy, and the international or cross-cultural venture in education. The importance of systematic value-theory in comparative research and international education. LEC
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Analysis of the role of social science in comparative education as perceived by different philosophies or schools of thought, such as Marxism, phenomenology, empiricism, pragmatism, and linguistic analysis. LEC
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An in-depth study of prominent European thinkers who have contributed to educational theory and practice (e.g., Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbert, Froebel, Montessori, Nietzsche, Freud, Piaget, Ortegay Gassit, etc.). Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC
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Select explorations into such provocative and problematic trends in current educational theory as Marxism, behaviorism, phenomenology, existentialism, analytic philosophy, hedonism, nonverbal education, etc. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC
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This course is designed for beginning master's degree students and for doctoral students who have had no previous administrative experience in college or university settings. Students will be introduced to the function and responsibilities of major administrative divisions of a college or university and to the major tasks of administration: planning, programming, budgeting, staffing, managing. An emphasis will be placed on current issues facing higher education and students will be introduced to the major journals of the field. As part of the course requirements, students will spend some time familiarizing themselves with one or more administrative offices on a college campus. Prerequisite: Admission to study in higher education at the graduate level. LEC
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This course is designed to include the study of the history and development of student personnel services in higher education, the role and function of the student affairs administrator, contemporary issues and problems, and an understanding of the organization and role of student affairs administration within higher education settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the higher education program or permission of instructor. LEC
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for graduate students. LEC
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Media surrounds today's learning environments. How can you effectively engage learners with multimedia, meaningful interactions, and motivational strategies? This course will take a hands-on practical approach to creating interactive educational multimedia products including, but not limited to, digital images, movies, podcast, Web publishing and educational games. Also, students will learn about the underlying learning theories of educational media development. LEC
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This course explores the design and use of new educational technologies to support constructivist learning. Throughout the course, students will (1) get hands-on experiences with emerging educational technologies, (2) examine how the underlying learning theories are reified into concrete learning environments, and (3) analyze how the affordances of new technologies (e.g., modeling and visualization) can facilitate the constructivist learning processes. This course is suitable for students who wish to develop greater knowledge about the ways emerging computer technologies can empower constructivist learning. Prerequisite: C&T 770. LEC
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This course introduces instructional design theory and production techniques for developing educational technology resources and systems. Students apply their understandings of design and education theories as they work in teams to develop real-world applications of educational technology for specific clients. LEC
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Supervised practice in a media center in selection, classifying, designing, producing, and/or managing instructional materials. Prerequisite: C&T 770 and C&T 871. FLD
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This class provides students with an understanding multicultural education as an instructional concept, educational reform movement, and systemic process meant to ensure educational equity for all people, especially those who have been inadequately served and/or historically discriminated against because of their racial/ethnic or linguistic backgrounds, gender or sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and special needs. Students will examine different theoretical approaches that inform the practice of multicultural education and explore the contribution of various social sciences to the field. LEC
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This course will provide an introduction to the sociology of education. This course is designed to fulfill the doctoral core requirement for social, historical and philosophical foundations of education. Specific topics will include: conflict over the purposes of education; how those purposes are-or are not-translated into actual classroom life; how educational systems have developed historically, how status, and more specifically race, class and gender relations, affect student experiences; and contemporary policy and reform movements. LEC
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An examination of the major ideas that have shaped practice in the schools. Emphasis is placed on assisting the student with the development of a coherent and consistent personal philosophy of education upon which administrative practice can be based. LEC
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This course examines education in urban communities through the foundational disciplines of history, philosophy, and the social sciences. Particular attention is given to ways in which the changing social and political contexts of American cities affect the educational process. LEC
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A comprehensive study of influential persons and movements in the development of educational thought, Eastern and Western, from ancient times to the present. Emphasis on those ideas and historical roots which are relevant to contemporary issues in teaching and school administration. LEC
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An analytic inquiry into basic philosophical positions and issues relevant to education. The difference between ELPS 770 and ELPS 771 is that the latter is topically arranged and does not necessarily follow a historical sequence; it normally proceeds by problems and schools of thought. LEC
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A study of the relation between education and culture in America from colonial times to the present. American schools are considered in the wider context of cultural and social change. LEC
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An exploration of changing attitudes toward children and youth, their subjective experience, their impact on adults, and the conditions that shaped their development. Special attention will be given to the relationship between the changing nature of childhood as a social and cultural category and the development of the education profession. LEC
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This course will provide an introduction to the methodology of historical research in education. This course is designed to fulfill the doctoral core requirement for research methods in education for students interested in doing this type of research. Specific topics will include: the historiography of education; working with primary and secondary documents; oral history as method and documentation, quantitative approaches to history; constructing historical narratives; the question of interpretation. LEC
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A study of the principles and processes of developing functional educational facilities. Special emphasis placed on the educational planning that precedes and provides the basis for architectural planning. Among topics considered are plant utilization analysis, enrollment projections, site and equipment needs, fiscal and legal constraints, environmental factors, and the development of educational specifications. Designed for both building and central office level administrators. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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A study of the organization and functions of student-teaching programs. Emphasis on the development of effective interpersonal relationships among school administrators, cooperating teachers, university supervisors, and student teachers. Designed for both administrative and instructional personnel. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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An examination of the sources and uses of fiscal resources in education including underlying concepts from economic theory, the impact of values on fiscal policy, state funding formulas, and school budgeting and accounting practices. LEC
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An examination of current trends in personnel evaluation with a focus on clinical supervision and adult development. Students will participate in simulation exercises to develop skills in classroom observation, conferencing techniques, evaluation of teaching artifacts, and the construction of staff development plans. LEC
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A study of children and youth with particular emphasis on demographic characteristics of the population served by schools and implications of those characteristics for schools and schooling. LEC
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Teacher Evaluation is based on clinical, empirical and theoretical information related to effective teacher evaluation behavior from the administrative perspective. It is intended to provide exposure to competencies essential to effective evaluation of teaching performance. Evaluation knowledge, skill and performance are acquired and developed through reading, discussion, active teaching of content related to teacher evaluation and practicing observation, recording and conferencing skills. A variety of approaches is considered, but behaviorally-anchored measurement of teaching behavior is emphasized. Opportunities and needs for improvement are identified with the assistance of video-taped diagnosis of conferencing behavior. Prerequisite: Two of the following: ELPS 750, ELPS 752, ELPS 753, or C&T 840. LEC
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This course focuses on laws that apply to special education. The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law and the judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. The course relates equal protection, procedural due process, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting disabled children and examines the sex principles of P.L. 94-142 and similar principles in state legislation. This course is not the equivalent of or a substitute for ELPS 752. (Same as SPED 851.) Prerequisite: SPED 750 or permission of instructor. LEC
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To train students to analyze public policy that affects disabled citizens, various models of analysis are brought to bear on federal policy (education, transportation, housing, institutionalization, protection and advocacy, medical assistance, employment, vocational rehabilitation and others). Not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as SPED 852.) Prerequisite: SPED 851 or SPED 750 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course addresses the issues that professionals (educators, physicians, allied health providers, attorneys and others) and families of disabled people face in the context of public values and attitudes and rules of law. The issues include, without limitation, education, treatment and non-treatment. Not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as SPED 853.) Prerequisite: SPED 750, SPED 851, SPED 852 or permission of instructor. LEC
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