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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Introduction to principles guiding integrative and functional Medical Nutrition Therapy; assessing, diagnosing, intervening, monitoring, and evaluating an individual client to restore function; focusing on the unique nutritional imbalances characteristic of chronic disease pathophysiology; supporting individuals with persistent symptoms; preventing chronic disease. Prerequisites: Introductory genetics, medical nutrition therapy, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Course content facilitates the understanding of advanced biochemical principles applied to human nutrition. Topics include protein structure, bioenergetics, enzyme function, nutrient digestion, absorption and metabolism, metabolic regulation and intermediary metabolism, cellular signaling, and genomics encompassing nucleotide metabolism, gene expression and gene regulation. Prerequisite: Undergraduate biochemistry or consent of instructor LEC
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Individual investigation of special problems in dietetics and nutrition or hospital dietary administration approved by the student's advisor or advisory committee. Investigation involves original research. RSH
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Energy containing macronutrients and fiber presented from the perspective of their importance in human nutrition. Structural properties, digestion, absorption and metabolism are emphasized. Fuel utilization in response to food intake and exercise, cellular and whole-animal energetic and energy balance integrate metabolism. Students take an active role in presenting and discussing and exhibit advanced skills in analysis and presentation. Prerequisites: BCHM 702 or Equivalent. LEC
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Vitamins and minerals presented from the perspective of their requirements as nutrients for normal human physiological functions with emphasis on their underlying roles in structure, function and metabolism. Students take an active role in selecting, presenting and discussing recent published research and to exhibit advanced skills in analysis and presentation. Prerequisites BCHM 702 or equivalent. LEC
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This course requires students to design a research study on a vitamin or mineral. Students submit a written proposal and present it orally and defend the proposal in class. Students will be evaluated on the basis of plausibility, feasibility and originality of the proposed research. Co-requisite DN 896. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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Scholarly essay based on research, written under the guidance of the student's advisor. Credit given upon meeting thesis requirements for the master's degree. Prerequisite: Consent of advisor. THE
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A series of seven laboratory modules emphasizing quantitative methods and experimental analysis. The series of modules will be team taught by departmental faculty. Each module requires data collection, data analysis, and written interpretation or report. Instrumentation, dietary assessment software utilization and cellular microtechniques will be emphasized. Students will be responsible for learning one technique practiced in an outside laboratory setting. Student will rotate between the module sequence based on the number of students enrolled in the class. Prerequisite: DN 895 and DN 896 or permission of instructor of record. LEC
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Advanced course examining current research topics in nutrition. Extensive student and faculty interaction is emphasized utilizing lectures, class discussion of selected scientific readings and oral presentations. Prerequisite: Admission to PhD program in Dietetics and Nutrition or permission of instructor. LEC
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Nuclear receptors and their mechanisms of action, nutritional control of gene expression and functional genomic studies with relationships to nutrient intake and polymorphisms. Prerequisites: DN 836, DN 895, DN 896 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Original and independent investigation approved by and conducted under the supervision of the student's advisor or advisory committee. This course is in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Prerequisite or corequisite: Restricted to Dietetics & Nutrition Ph.D. candidates, or consent of DN advisor. Students must have completed the qualifying exam. LEC
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Preparation of the written dissertation based upon original research and in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the Ph.D. degree. Prerequisite: DN 990 or consent of advisor. LEC
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Advanced problems in drawing. Prerequisite: ART 102. LAB
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Figure drawing. Prerequisite: ART 102 and ART 103 or ART 104. LAB
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Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; or permission of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of DRWG 203. Prerequisite: DRWG 203. LAB
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Continuation of DRWG 213. Prerequisite: DRWG 213. LAB
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Figure drawing, a continuation of DRWG 213. Prerequisite: DRWG 213; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC
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Course to be offered in area of special interest to individual faculty, and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: DRWG 203, or DRWG 213, or permission of instructor. LAB
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Course to be offered in an area of special interest to individual faculty and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Drawing courses, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of DRWG 304. Prerequisite: DRWG 304. LAB
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Continuation of DRWG 505. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 505. LAB
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Continuation of DRWG 314. Prerequisite: DRWG 314. LAB
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Continuation of DRWG 515. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 515. LAB
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Figure drawing, a continuation of DRWG 314 or DRWG 318. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 314 or DRWG 318; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC
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Figure drawing, a continuation of DRWG 515 or DRWG 518. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters. Prerequisite: DRWG 515 or DRWG 518; membership in the University Honors Program or 3.25 minimum cumulative grade-point average; and permission of the department. LEC
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Course to be offered in area of special interest to individual faculty, and qualified students. (This course is not regularly offered. The current Schedule of Classes should be consulted.) May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: 12 hours of drawing and permission of instructor. LAB
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Individual studio activity; capstone experience. Course content to be determined by the student under supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated for credit in subsequent semesters; a maximum of nine hours may apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: ART 102, ART 103, and ART 104; and twelve hours of Drawing courses, or permission of instructor. IND
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Individual research in drawing. Prerequisite: DRWG 506. RSH
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Individual research in figure drawing. Prerequisite: DRWG 516. RSH
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Continuation of DRWG 807. Prerequisite: DRWG 807. RSH
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Continuation of DRWG 817. Prerequisite: DRWG 817. RSH
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This is a variable-topic course open to undergraduates meeting the prerequisites for the specific topic being offered. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of decision science topics not covered by established courses. Enrollment is not limited to School of Business students. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. LEC
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An introduction to statistical inference techniques with emphasis on the application of these techniques to decision making in a firm. Topics include probability theory, random variables, probability distribution functions, estimation, test of hypothesis, regression, correlation, and introduction to statistical process control. Corequisite: Calculus II and IST 301. LEC
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An introduction to decision making under the uncertainty encountered in business and in everyday life. Covers selected topics in probability, statistics, economics, and operations research, and their application to complex problems in financial management, marketing, operations management, supply chain management, and quality management; as well as risks affecting everyday life, such as personal decisions in regard to career, marriage, and wealth management. (Not open to students with credit in SCM 310.) Prerequisite: ENGL 101 and MATH 101. LEC
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This is a variable-topic seminar. Its purpose is to allow the occasional offering of decision science topics not covered by established courses. Prerequisite: Determined for each topic by instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A further study of problems encountered in production from a managerial perspective employing the methodology of management science. Topics included in the course are location of facilities, design of product lines, replacement of facilities, quality control, production planning, production and inventory control, and scheduling. This course is in the Management Science and Operations Management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Decision making under uncertainty and resource allocation models were introduced in DSCI 310. These topics will be covered in greater depth in this course. Applications of these models to complex problems in business will be emphasized. Cases illustrating the use of these models will also be covered. This course is in the Management Science and Operations Management area. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310). Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected topics in decision sciences not otherwise available to the student. Topics selected to be determined by the special interests and objectives of the student in consultation with a faculty member who will supervise the reading and research. Prerequisite: SCM 310 (formerly DSCI 310), FIN 310, MGMT 310, and MKTG 310; 3.0 professional grade point average and approval of proposed plan of study by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to data gathering and analysis with an emphasis on problem solving for decision making and process improvement in a business setting. The role of numerical data in the understanding of business problems and in the evaluation of planned improvements is studied, along with the study of variation commonly occurring in business processes and methods of reducing this variation. Statistical software is used to supplement data analysis and aid in the problem solving. Topics covered may include statistical methods such as exploratory data analysis, graphical analysis, Pareto analysis, stratification analysis, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, correlation, linear regression, and control charts. LEC
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This course examines the business from an operations mindset. Topics covered include supplier relationships, JIT and OPT, quality, customer-focus, and manufacturing as a competitive advantage. A systems integration view will be stressed instead of a functional view. Prerequisite: DSCI 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A survey of forecasting methods and application. Essential concepts underlying these methods are discussed, including cost and performance characteristics. Criteria for selection of appropriate methods are developed. Issues concerning effective utilization for forecasting in several corporate planning situations are considered. Prerequisite: IST 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will take a closer look at various aspects of the total quality theory and its practices. Particular attention will be paid to the foundations of total quality theory including Deming's 14 principles of management and key tenants of Juran and Crosby. Additional topics include an examination of the continual improvement process in theory and action, strategies for getting started, and issues to address during a transformation into a total quality model of operation. Prerequisite: DSCI 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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An introduction to management principles supporting the concept that a primary goal of a business is to meet the needs of its customers. To accomplish this goal, organizations must design, build, and deliver products and services that meet customer needs in a resource effective manner. Topics covered include the role of the customer, the nature of process improvement in meeting customer needs in a cost effective manner, the view of the organization as a system, the reduction of variation in all organizational processes, the nature of continual organizational learning, and the responsibilities of management in this approach. LEC
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This course will cover theories of decision making under uncertainty and competition. Examples of topics that may be covered are Bayesian decision theory, game theory, habitual domain theory for forming winning strategies and effective decision making. Automated aids for decision making such as expert systems may also be covered. Prerequisite: DSCI 701 and DSCI 702, or consent of instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course deals with process improvement through the reduction and control of variation in business organizations. The result of reduced variation is an improvement of integral organizational functions, a reduction of costs, and a minimization of defects in the market place. Data driven improvement is emphasized. Topics covered include advanced discussion of using control charts for process improvement, and the use of designed experiments in process improvement. Particular emphasis will be given to methods used to analyze a given process, to the use of statistical tools to stabilize an entire process, to understand the natural variability in process output and to reducing process variation. Prerequisite: DSCI 701. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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This course will examine the major manufacturing and the operating strategies used by firms today. A partial list of these strategies include quality improvement, theory of constraints, just-in-time, and manufacturing planning and control systems. Pros and cons of each strategy will be discussed. Implementation issues will also be discussed. Prerequisite: DSCI 702. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic course open to graduate and selected undergraduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Determined by the instructor. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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A variable-topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Enrollment restricted. LEC
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of decision science to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Students must have at least a 3.0 grade point average and be in good academic standing in a graduate business program and must submit a written statement of the proposed project approved by a supervisory faculty member prior to enrollment. RSH
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(F) This course covers the basic theory of probability and its use for research in the business disciplines. The course is designed primarily for Ph.D. students in the business school. Prerequisite: Doctoral standing and two semesters of calculus, or consent of instructor. LEC
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(S) This course covers the basic theory of statistics and its use for research in the business disciplines. The course is designed primarily for Ph.D. students in the School of Business. Prerequisite: DSCI 920. LEC
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This course presents various statistical tools for undertaking quantitative research in business. The regression model under the full ideal conditions is discussed, along with methodological issues that arise when these ideal conditions are violated, as often occurs in business research. A high degree of theoretical rigor is maintained, along with an emphasis on practical applications through the use of assignments that require data analysis. Prerequisite: DSCI 921 or consent of instructor. LEC
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(V) This course will cover advanced topics in probability and statistics with application to various business disciplines. Topics covered may vary and will depend on the instructor. Examples of topics that may be covered are time series models, stochastic processes, uncertainty in artificial intelligence, multivariate statistics, etc. Prerequisite: DSCI 920 and DSCI 921, or consent of instructor. LEC
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(V) This course will cover basic and advanced topics in optimization theory and applications. Examples of topics that may be covered are linear programming, nonlinear programming, dynamic programming, multiple-criteria decision making, habitual domain theory for forming winning strategies and effective decision making and game theory. Prerequisite: Linear algebra and real analysis or consent of instructor. LEC
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The seminar will discuss current research in management science topics such as artificial intelligence, statistics, optimization, decision making, decision support systems, and production/operations management. Topics covered will reflect the research interests of the instructor and participants. Participants are required to lead the discussion for at least one paper of their choice. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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A variable topic seminar open only to graduate students meeting the requirements established by faculty members offering the course. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will research selected topics in the field of business administration under the direction of a graduate faculty member. Students are expected to report the results of their research by writing a publishable-quality scholarly article. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising graduate faculty member. RSH
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Individual study of selected current problems in the field of business administration to be adapted to the special interests and objectives of the students and conducted through extensive reading and research. Student must submit written statement of proposed project. Prerequisite: Approval required from supervising faculty member and PhD Team. RSH
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(V) Individual research work. THE
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Special course designed to enable graduate students to develop a reading knowledge of Dutch as a research skill. Enrollment for undergraduate credit is required. Does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. LEC
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Continuation of DTCH 100. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: DTCH 100 or equivalent. LEC
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Essentials of grammar; practice in speaking, reading, and writing Dutch. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. LEC
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Similar to DTCH 104 with additional work to expand the student's cultural context and understanding. Not open to native speakers of Dutch or students who have completed DTCH 104. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: DTCH 104 or equivalent. LEC
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Course content similar to DTCH 108, with additional cultural study. Meets 5 days a week. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of DTCH 108. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: DTCH 108 or equivalent. LEC
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Course content similar to DTCH 212, with additional cultural study. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of DTCH 212. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: DTCH 212 or equivalent. LEC
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Course content similar to DTCH 216, with additional cultural study. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. Prerequisite: Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of Dutch. IND
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A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Not open to students who have taken REL 108/EALC 108. (Same as REL 106.) LEC
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A basic introduction to religion in India, China, and Japan with emphasis upon religions that affect the modern period. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have taken REL 106/EALC 105. (Same as REL 108.) LEC
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An overview of contemporary Chinese culture and society since the economic reforms and opening up launched in 1978, through the study of changes in politics, the economy, society, culture and everyday life in China. The course is taught in English. No prior knowledge of Chinese language is required. LEC
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A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy which are better known to the Western world. (Same as ANTH 293.) LEC
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A survey of the commonly held ideas about the beginning of the world, the role of gods and spirits in daily life, and the celebrations and rituals proper to each season of the year. The purpose of the course is to present the world view of the ordinary peoples of East Asia in contrast to their more sophisticated systems of philosophy that are better known to the Western world. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the cultural heritage of Japan from earliest times to Meiji Restoration. Emphasis will be placed upon Japan's literary tradition. Not open to students with credit in EALC 512. LEC
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Special purpose subject in East Asia and contiguous regions. LEC
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An introduction to modern Asia (19th-20th centuries) through the reading of autobiographies by men and women of China, Japan, Korea, Tibet, and Vietnam. Combination of lecture and discussion format. LEC
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Topics are various aspects of Chinese and Japanese cultures. LEC
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Special purpose subject in East Asia and contiguous regions. LEC
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This course acquaints the student with the broad outlines of the traditional cultures and literatures of China and the contiguous regions of Inner Asia and Tibet. Course materials include translations and discussions of oral tales, epics, poetry, novels, and biography, which explore the interaction between these regions and cultures as well as their continuities and disparities. The course is most appropriate for students with no background in Asian culture. LEC
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A wide-ranging examination of the similarities and difference between Japanese and Korean culture through folklore, literature, film, and other texts. Format: Lecture and discussion. Designed for students with no background in Asian culture. LEC
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Reading and analysis of the form and types of Chinese novel, its beginnings and development to the present day. LEC
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A survey of the major works of Japan's long literary heritage. Readings from such classics as the Tale of Genji, the world's first novel, No drama, and poetry will acquaint the student with one of the world's great literary traditions. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 712.) LEC
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A general survey of representative literary works of major genres in traditional China. Lectures, assigned readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 714.) LEC
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This course surveys the major developments in and critical approaches to twentieth-century Japanese film. Focusing mostly on narrative films, the course introduces students to basic methodological issues in Japanese film history, especially questions of narrative, genre, stardom, and authorship. We examine Japanese cinema as an institution located within specific contexts focusing on the ways in which this institution shapes gender, race, class, ethnic and national identities. This course examines how patterns of distribution, exhibition, and reception have influenced film aesthetics and film style over the last century. Through secondary readings, lectures, and discussions students critically examine how Japanese cinema as an institution both responds to and intervenes in the social, cultural, and political history of twentieth century Japan. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. (Same as FMS 315.) LEC
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A survey of major literary works of Japan's modern era through the Pacific War. Topics include the social and spiritual challenges of modernization, urbanization, and the issues of race and national identity. Works by Soseki, Ogai, Akutagawa, Tanizaki, Kawabata, and others will be covered. This course is offered at the 300 and the 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 716. LEC
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A survey of major literary works of Japan's post-war and contemporary eras. Topics include life during and after the war, the experience of the atomic bomb, and the postmodern landscape. Works by Dazai, Mishima, Oe, Abe, Murakami, and others will be covered. The course is offered at the 300 and 700 levels, with additional assignments at the 700 level. Not open to students who have completed EALC 717. LEC
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A general survey of the important writers of the 20th century and their works. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. (Not open to students with credit in EALC 718.) LEC
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A general survey of the important writers of recent decades and their works. Lectures, readings, and discussions in English. A knowledge of Chinese is not required. LEC
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An examination of Chinese culture from earliest times to the modern period. Emphasis will be placed upon China's literary tradition. LEC
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Topics in the Chinese and Japanese cultures. LEC
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Introduction to Asian culture and society through close reading and analysis of important works of Asian literature. Themes and issues to be focused upon will vary (e.g., traditional or modern literature of China, Japan, or Korea, and special topics of interest). Lecture and discussion format. Knowledge of Asian languages is not required. LEC
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Introduction to Asian culture and society through close reading and analysis of important works of Asian literature. Themes and issues to be focused upon will vary (e.g., traditional or modern literature of China, Japan, or Korea, and special topics of interest). Lecture and discussion format. Knowledge of Asian languages is not required. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Chinese and the interactions between language and culture. Depending on student interest, a unit on the pedagogy of teaching Chinese as a foreign language may also be included. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. Students taking the course at the 500 level will have more work required of them. LEC
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An exploration of the Japanese way of life, self-concepts, and world view through lecture, discussion, reading, and field trips to businesses, community organizations, and cultural sites. Offered only during the Summer Institute in Hiratsuka, Japan. LEC
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This course explores rapidly changing gender relationships and the sense of being "modern" in East Asia by examining marriage and family systems, work, education, consumer culture, and geopolitics. The class seeks to understand how uneven state control over men and women shapes desires, practices, and norms and how men and women act upon such forces. Avoiding biological or social determinism, this course treats gender as an analytical category and examines how modern nation-states and global geopolitics are constituted and operated. (Same as ANTH 363 and WGSS 363.) LEC
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An analysis of the cultural diversity and unity of the peoples of Japan and Korea. Emphasis on historical and ethnological relationships, social structure, and ethics. (Same as ANTH 364.) LEC
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Japanese people's culture and society through an extensive examination of both documentary and feature films. Readings from social science fields and literature will be used--the former to supply a theoretical framework for the study of Japanese people and the latter to further the inquiry into the individual sentiment motivating actions. (Same as ANTH 365.) LEC
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