Print...

Browse all courses

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
Show courses in
with a course number to
worth in .

There are 9,438 results.

Advanced blood banking and theory focused on the problems encountered in the hospital transfusion service and a donor drawing center. Prerequisite: CLS 544 and CLS 545, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Individual participation in a hospital immunohematology laboratory. Students gain practical experience in the use of procedures and equipment by working with the staff. Performance of standard laboratory procedures will be done under supervision. Prerequisite: CLS 544, CLS 545, and CLS 644, or CLS 644 concurrently, or consent of instructor. LAB
View current sections...
Advanced lectures on hematologic and hemorrhagic disorders with emphasis on pathological mechanisms, interpretation, and clinical correlation of test results. Prerequisite: CLS 536, CLS 537, CLS 546, and CLS 547, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A tutorial laboratory experience conducted in the clinical setting and designed to provide expertise in current methodology, instrumentation, and automation of basic and advanced hematology and coagulation procedures. Prerequisite: CLS 546, CLS 547, and CLS 646, or CLS 646 concurrently, or consent of instructor. LAB
View current sections...
Lectures on immune system involvement in disease processes and correlation of immunologic laboratory test data to disease conditions. Prerequisite: CLS 549, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Practice of basic immunoassay procedures and introduction to immunonephelometry as well as direct and indirect fluorescent antibody technique. Prerequisite: CLS 648 or CLS 648 concurrently, or consent of instructor. LAB
View current sections...
This review will enable students to identify areas of weakness in their understanding of clinical laboratory science. Students will participate in question-answer sessions and panel discussions in order to evaluate their performance in meeting required competencies. Prerequisite: CLS 520-CLS 549 inclusive, CLS 605, CLS 661, and CLS 640-CLS 649 inclusive, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Situation and problem solving oriented web based course that reviews material taught. This course will enable students to identify areas of weakness in their understanding of molecular biotechniques and their applications. Interactive question-answer format and a comprehensive, certification-type exam will aid students in evaluating their performance in meeting required competencies. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Laboratory Sciences program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to basic principles of management, education, and research and their application in the current health care environment. Course content includes: management theory, scope of management, quality issues, budgeting, personnel issues, evaluation and application of management concepts; introductory research methods and evaluation of journal articles. Cross listed with HEIM 661 and RESP 661. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Laboratory Sciences program or consent of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Educational concepts including principles of learning, curriculum design, evaluation, teaching methodologies, audiovisual and library resources, accreditation, student services, and legal considerations. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Laboratory Science program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A course of study offering the student the opportunity for acquisition of additional knowledge and skills in one of the clinical laboratory routine areas or a specialty area, e.g., cytogenetics, metabolic analysis, or supervision; or at another clinical site. Course requirements designed in cooperation with student. Prerequisite: Admission to the Clinical Laboratory Science program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Review of integrative human physiology with an emphasis upon homeostatic mechanisms and etiologies of disease. The interrelationships of function and dysfunction at the molecular, cellular and tissue level (pathology), organ and systematic level (impairment), and to the total human body (functional limitations )will be applied in each of the body systems. Discussions and applied materials will be tailored to the professional student population. Prerequisite: Admission to the Dietetics and Nutrition program or permission of the instructor(s). LEC
View current sections...
A lecture course covering the theory underlying molecular techniques involving nucleic acids. Topics include purification and analysis of nucleic acids, recombinant DNA, construction and screening of genetic libraries, genetic engineering, control of gene expression, construction of gene fusions, amplification, hybridization, and nucleic acid databases and their analysis. This course is meant for graduate students in the Molecular Biotechnology program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A laboratory course that introduces students to the application and practice of molecular techniques involving nucleic acids. Topics include purification and analysis of nucleic acids, recombinant DNA, genetic engineering, control of gene expression, construction of gene fusions, amplification, and hybridization. Topics are covered through a project-based approach. This course is meant for graduate students in the Molecular Biotechnology program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB
View current sections...
A lecture course covering the theory underlying molecular techniques involving proteins. Topics include fractionation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, protein extraction and quantification, native and denaturing electrophoresis, protein purification and solubilization, analysis of protein-protein interactions, construction of fusions, site directed mutagenesis, control of protein expression, and proteomics. This course is meant for graduate students in the Molecular Biotechnology program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A laboratory course that introduces students to the application and practice of molecular techniques involving proteins. Topics include fractionation of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, protein extraction and quantification, native and denaturing electrophoresis, protein purification and solubilization, analysis of fusions, and control of protein expression. Topics are covered through a project-based approach. The course is meant for graduate students in the Molecular Biotechnology program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB
View current sections...
A seminar course that address topics including scientific, business, legal, social, and ethical issues in biotechnology. Students explore these topics through literature discussions, student presentations, and discussions with speakers from biotechnology-related academic and industry sectors. This course is meant for graduate students in the Molecular Biotechnology program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. SEM
View current sections...
This course is an introduction to the critical reading of journal articles from the current literature in molecular biotechnology. Discussions will emphasize the analysis of experimental design and technique, as well as the significance of the results and validity of the author's conclusions. Students will learn how to search for articles and background information pertaining to selected topics, an how to present a polished, professional summary of that literature. Assigned papers for discussion and student presentations will focus on new strategies and technologies in molecular biotechnology of wide fundamental importance, or on hypothesis-based research that uses molecular biotechnological approaches. Prerequisite: Completion of (or concurrent enrollment in ) CLS 710 and CLS 720. LEC
View current sections...
Formats, techniques, and styles of scientific writing. Emphasis will be placed on clear, concise, and effective writing. The class will focus on the process of writing scientific manuscripts and grant proposals. Students will identify and define the sections of scientific manuscripts as well as grant proposals. During the course, each student will write an R21-type (NIH Exploratory/Developmental Research Grant) proposals as could be submitted to the most appropriate NIH Institute. This course is intended for students enrolled in their final semester of the Master of Science in Molecular Biotechnology program. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor LEC
View current sections...
Advanced course on special topics in molecular biotechnology, offered by arrangement. May include lectures, discussions,readings, laboratory techniques, and supervised research experience. This course is intended for graduate students in the Molecular Biotechnology program. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced practical experience in a selected laboratory focused on nucleic acid-based diagnostic methodologies and technologies. Students apply and extend their knowledge and skills by performing a research and/or development project under the supervision of a site mentor. This practicum is performed at a site other than those utilized for CLS 751 (Practicum II) and CLS 752 (Practicum III). Prerequisite: Completion of CLS 710, CLS 711, CLS 720, and CLS 721. PRA
View current sections...
Advanced practical experience in a selected laboratory actively pursuing applied or basic research questions utilizing genetic, biochemical, or other molecular biology-related approaches. Students apply and extend their knowledge and skills by performing a research and/or development project under the supervision of a site mentor. This practicum is performed at a site other than those utilized for CLS 750 (Practicum I) and CLS (Practicum III). Prerequisite: Completion of CLS 710, CLS 711, CLS 720, and CLS 721. PRA
View current sections...
Advanced practical experience in a selected laboratory actively pursuing applied or basic research questions utilizing genetic, biochemical, or other molecular biology-related approaches. Students apply and extend their knowledge and skills by performing a research and/or development project under the supervision of a site mentor. This practicum is performed at a site other than those utilized for CLS 750 (Practicum I) and CLS 751 (Practicum II). Prerequisite: Completion of CLS 710, CLS 711, CLS 720, and CLS 721. PRA
View current sections...
A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. LEC
View current sections...
The study of Greek and Roman mythology through extensive readings in primary classical texts and secondary authors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the history, methods, and excavation techniques of archaeology, with special emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include stratigraphy, chronology, artifact analysis, the role of archaeology in our understanding of Greek and Roman society, and the treatment of archaeology in popular culture. Illustrated throughout with presentations of important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean such as Athens and Pompeii, from the earliest times through late antiquity. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be writers of poetry and prose such as Homer, Sappho, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, athletics, oral performance, sexuality, and the development of literary genres. No knowledge of Greek required and no prerequisite. LEC
View current sections...
A study of English words drawn from Greek and Latin for all those interested in the sources of the English vocabulary. Enough Greek and Latin for essential purposes is also studied. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be authors such as Plautus, Vergil, Livy, Petronius, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, oratory, slavery, political propaganda, the Roman games, and the development of Roman literature. No knowledge of Latin required and no prerequisite. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E.- 500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA 526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as HA 317, HWC 317.) LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of CLSX 230. An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the terminology of science with reference to its debt to the Greek and Latin languages. While all the natural sciences will be treated, there will be some emphasis on the biological sciences. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of CLSX 240. An introduction to ancient Roman Literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Roman texts. No knowledge of Latin required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as HWC 380.) LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of CLSX 151, with the focus towards critical approaches and research. Special attention is paid to recent methodological, theoretical, and ethical debates within the profession of Classical archaeology. Assignments and activities may include position papers on contentious issues of the day, research assignments, and/or field trips to museums and related institutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern notions and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required: (Same as HWC 374.) LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides will be read in translation. The criticism of the plays, and the role they play in Athenian (and Greek) culture of the 5th century. This course includes the Oresteia, Oedipus Tyrannus, Antigone, and Medea. No knowledge of Greek is required. LEC
View current sections...
The later plays of Euripides and Sophocles, selected plays by the comic dramatist Aristophanes, and passages from the historian Thucydides. Criticism of the plays, and discussion of themes common to literature and history in this period. The dissolution of a high culture. CLSX 384 is NOT a prerequisite. No knowledge of Greek required. LEC
View current sections...
An examination covering the six areas of course work and reading for the Classical Antiquity major, to be taken by the student pursuing the major in the last semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: A declared major in Classical Antiquity and status as a graduating senior. IND
View current sections...
Under the supervision of an advisor in Classics, the student will do extensive reading in the area of Classics generously defined, to result in two or more papers as agreed upon between faculty and student. IND
View current sections...
Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Classical literature, culture, or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND
View current sections...
The place of Latin among the Indo-European languages and the languages of Italy, its development as a literary medium, and how it changed in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar from its beginnings through the Medieval period. LEC
View current sections...
Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as HIST 502). LEC
View current sections...
This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Greek antiquity. Contents will vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 515.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary survey of the major cultures of the prehistoric Aegean (Greek) world from the Neolithic period to the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1100 B.C.E.), with special emphasis on the cultural and artistic achievements of the Mycenaeans, Minoans, and Cycladic islanders, including their contacts with the neighboring cultures of Anatolia (Hittites and Troy), the Levant, Egypt, and South Italy. Includes lecture with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 525.) LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of the ancient Greek world from the Protogeometric period to the end of the Hellenistic age (ca. 1100 - 30 B.C.E.), with emphasis on the major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression (e.g., architecture, sculpture, vase painting). Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 526.) LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of ancient Rome from its origins to the late empire (8th c.B.C.E. - 4th c.C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression, as well as on Etruscan and Greek influence on Rome and Rome's influence on its provinces. Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities; and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). (Same as HA 537.) LEC
View current sections...
A cross-cultural survey of the material remains of the major civilizations of the ancient Near East, including Anatolia, Mesopotamia, the Levant, and Egypt from Neolithic period to the rise of the Roman empire (ca. 6000 B.C.E. - 30 B.C.E.). Includes lectures with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 529.) LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Classics at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only six hours may count toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, genre, or period of literature from the ancient classical world. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC
View current sections...
Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, medium, region, or period in the archaeology and art of the ancient Near Eastern and classical world. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Attendance at CLSX 384 required, plus one seminar per week, discussing the scholarly background of the major lecture, as well as the problems and aims of teaching Greek drama in English to undergraduates. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH
View current sections...
A continuation of CLSX 717. Attendance at CLSX 388 plus one seminar per week. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH
View current sections...
Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Classics courses. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
View current sections...
Thesis hours. THE
View current sections...
Analysis of design alternatives and investment opportunities based on the time value of money. Topics include financial statements and accounting concepts related to economic analysis, time value of money and cash flow equivalence, cost of capital and minimum attractive rate of return (MARR), defining mutually exclusive alternatives, developing alternative after-tax cash flows, performing investment and replacement studies, and methods for addressing uncertainty and risk. Prerequisite: MATH 220 or MATH 320, or consent of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the construction industry, construction project management, and construction operations. Topics include project participant roles and responsibilities; project delivery systems; procurement of construction services; sustainable construction; contracts, bonds, and insurance; equipment selection and use; constructability and value engineering; estimating and bidding; planning and scheduling; operations management; safety; and project commissioning and closeout. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing in the School of Engineering, or consent of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the management of construction projects. This course addresses project delivery systems, project organization, estimating and bidding, planning and scheduling, legal and safety issues, among other topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. Not open to those with credit in CMGT 500. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the planning and scheduling of projects, for both construction and design. Emphasis is placed on the critical path method including network development, production of time schedules, time-cost considerations, and the efficient utilization of resources. Manual and computer techniques are covered. Prerequisite: CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, and MATH 526 or EMGT 802, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces the student to the multitude of construction equipment employed in construction. The underlying technology and engineering principles are reviewed. Principles of equipment selection, equipment utilization, and equipment economic analysis are covered. Prerequisite: CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, MATH 526 or EMGT 802, and CMGT 357 or EMGT 806, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Operations analysis for work improvement in construction using process charts, crew balancing, time-lapse photography, and planning techniques. Regulations, accident prevention, and safety management are covered. Prerequisite: CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, MATH 526 or EMGT 802, and CMGT 357 or EMGT 806, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the quantity survey, cost estimating, scheduling and project controls; construction operations; and methods of building construction. Prerequisite: CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, MATH 526 or EMGT 802, and CMGT 357 or EMGT 806, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Legal doctrines relating to owners, design professionals, and contractors. Sources of law, forms of association, and agency. Contract formation, rights and duties, interpretation, performance problems, disputes, and claims. Surety bonds and insurance. Prerequisite: CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces students to Sustainable Design Concepts that are applicable to Civil and Architectural Engineering. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in Architectural Engineering, Architecture, or Civil Engineering or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the management of international construction projects. This course focuses on areas where international construction project management differs from the management of domestic construction projects. Topics include project delivery systems including build-operate-transfer (BOT) and other systems unique to international construction contracts; the impact of the host country's language, demographics, laws, political structure, geography, economics, culture, and customs on project delivery; currency transfer and risk; procurement and expediting; designing construction means and methods that optimize available labor, material, and equipment; participant roles and responsibilities; among other topics. Prerequisite: CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: Varies with topic. LEC
View current sections...
Graduate-level directed readings on a topic in construction management mutually agreed on by the student and instructor. Intended to build on one or more of the core course topics: project management; planning and scheduling; equipment and methods; quality; productivity and safety; estimating and bidding; contracts, bonds, and insurance. CMGT 801 may be repeated for credit to a maximum of three hours in the degree program. Mutually agreed course deliverable(s) required. Prerequisite: Approval of the course topic and deliverable(s) by the instructor, CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, CMGT 701, CMGT 702, CMGT 703, CMGT 704, and CMGT 705, or consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Graduate-level investigation requiring research of a topic in construction management mutually agreed on by the student and instructor. Intended to build on one or more of the core course topics: project management; planning and scheduling; equipment and methods; quality; productivity and safety; estimating and bidding; contracts, bonds, and insurance. CMGT 802 may be repeated for credit to a maximum of three hours in the degree program. Mutually agreed course deliverable such as a paper summarizing the results of the investigation required. Prerequisite: Approval of the course topic and deliverable by the instructor, CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, CMGT 701, CMGT 702, CMGT 703, CMGT 704, and CMGT 705, or consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Project level cost control concepts and structure, time and cost integration, data collection and reporting, equipment cost, job overhead cost, and cost control. Integrating construction project level cost with construction company financial accounting and financial management. Prerequisite: CMGT 702 and CMGT 704 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: Varies with topic. LEC
View current sections...
Graduate-level investigation and report on a construction management topic mutually agreed on by the student and project advisor. This is the capstone course in the Master of Construction Management (MCM) degree program. Successful completion of this project requires acceptance of the written report and oral presentation to the student's graduate committee. Prerequisite: Approval of project topic by project advisor, CMGT 500 or CMGT 700, CMGT 701, CMGT 702, CMGT 703, CMGT 704, CMGT 705, and nine elective credit hours, or consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Survey of the major areas of the Communication Studies field. Provides an overview of communication theory and research methods, and introduces key topics, approaches, and applications in core areas such as rhetoric, organizational communication, interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, and communication technology. LEC
View current sections...
Study of rhetorical theory and its application to the preparation, presentation, and criticism of oral discourse in audience situations. Special consideration of listening behavior and of the ethical conduct of speech in a free society. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. LEC
View current sections...
The study of rhetorical theory and its application to the preparation, presentation, and criticism of oral discourse in audience situations. Special consideration of listening behavior and of the ethical conduct of speech in a free society. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. This is an honors section of COMS 130 open only to students in the Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
This course is an introduction to communication theory, process, and skill. The course seeks to increase the student's understanding of communication theory, both interpersonal and public, and of his or her own communicative behavior. Class projects and participation urge students to apply this theoretical knowledge to a variety of settings, including interpersonal and addressing groups and audiences. This course does not fulfill the College argument and reason requirement. Not open to those who have credit in COMS 130. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces students to the study of the leadership process. Course covers theories and research on core themes of leadership, focusing on how course materials relates to students' own leadership experiences. Not open to seniors. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the principles of debating. Emphasis on debating techniques, analysis of the question, methods of using evidence, refutation, and brief making. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. LEC
View current sections...
For students selected by faculty supervisor for work on university debate squad. Students to enroll at time of their selection. Recurring enrollments permitted. FLD
View current sections...
This course examines in detail the texts of speeches and essays on controversial issues in order to illustrate the varied forms of rhetorical action and the diverse modes of analysis and evaluation that can be applied to them. Examples are drawn from the rhetorical literature of contemporary U.S. speakers and prose writers. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
View current sections...
Examines basic theoretical perspectives and research on verbal and nonverbal communication elements affecting communication between individuals in a variety of contexts. Topics include communication competence, developmental aspects of interpersonal communication, and interpersonal influence. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
View current sections...
This course attempts to provide an understanding of communication as it affects culture and as it is affected by culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the principle of similarity and differences as it relates to the roles of verbal and non-verbal symbols, codes, and cues, stereotypes, prejudices and value and thought patterning systems between and among cultures. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides a foundation for the study of communication in organizational contexts. It introduces students to various organization theories including classical, human relations, systems, and cultural approaches and examines the role of communication in each. Information flow, communication climate, communication networks, work relationships and managerial communication are discussed as well as organizational symbolism, conflict resolution, rituals and ethics. The course is designed to heighten students' awareness of the role of communication in the organizing process and to develop their abilities to diagnose and prevent communication-related problems. Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces social and communication issues in the context of online interaction. Surveys a range of social internet technologies (e.g., newsgroups, chat, MUDs, etc.). Focus is on the interpersonal topics, including the establishment and maintenance of individual and cultural identities, personal relationships, the emergence of online communities, power and conflict in online groups, language use in online contexts, and how online groups are used to enhance or alter civic and global cultures. LEC
View current sections...
The purpose of this course is to develop effective written, spoken, and electronically mediated communication skills necessary for business. Students will write short technical reports, plan meetings and conferences, prepare and present briefings and persuasive proposals with visual aids, and examine the use of new communication technologies. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
View current sections...
Guided experiences in the preparation and presentation of discourse intended to influence outcomes of human interactions in various speaker-audience situations, including television. Special emphasis on speech styles in influencing thought, attitudes, and behavior. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
View current sections...
Historical survey of theories of communication and persuasion, the people who produced them, and the philosophical assumptions upon which they rest. Beginning with the Greeks, especially Plato and Aristotle, and ending with selections from Kenneth Burke and other contemporary figures, the course focuses on changing concepts of rhetoric throughout a time span of some 2000 years. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
View current sections...
This course investigates the ways in which rhetorical strategies (persuasive and linguistic usage) permeate the relationship between politics and politicians and the mass media. We will analyze media coverage of political debates, the presidential use of radio, television and press conferences, and the network evening news coverage of political events to see how political decisions are influenced by and influence the media. (Same as POLS 521.) Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC
View current sections...
This course introduces basic concepts important to leading and/or participating in problem-solving work teams. Problem identification and analysis and leadership are emphasized and practiced. Teamwork variables are discussed and promoted. Lecture, demonstrations, exercises in class are structure for students to analyze groups outside of class. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
View current sections...
This course studies communication issues, theories, research and skills applicable to sustaining and enriching long-term relationships, such as families, friendships and close workplace collaborations. Emphasis is given to applying course concepts to students' own relationships and interaction in class. Prerequisite: COMS 244. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the nature of theory and theory building in the study of human communication. Research methods include experimentation, survey, content analysis, and field description. An introduction to statistics and statistical tests is included as well. Prerequisite: MATH 101 and admission to the Communication Studies major or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An examination of dyadic level communication in organizations, with emphasis on contexts of superior-subordinate and peer communication. The course also addresses contexts of organizational entry and exit, perception and judgment, information seeking, feedback, and organizational attachment. Prerequisite: COMS 310. LEC
View current sections...
An exploration of the communication patterns and challenges between organizational groups and organizations as a whole. Key elements include networks, boundary spanning, inter-organizational collaboration, and the role of technology in linking large organizational components. Prerequisite: COMS 310 or instructor permission. LEC
View current sections...
Examination of the communication challenges faced by distributed organizations, especially those with a global presence. Topics include telework, virtual terms, and new processes required to support interaction among people located in several different places. Prerequisite: COMS 310 or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Examines the social, cultural, and economic challenges and opportunities advanced communication technologies and globalization pose to processes such as democratic deliberation, urban governance, and environmental sustainability. Prerequisite: COMS 130. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an overview of the role of communication in leadership in a variety of contexts, including: interpersonal, small group, intercultural, organizational, and public sphere. It will include theoretical and experiential approaches to effective leadership communication. Prerequisite: Admission to Leadership Minor or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Changing styles of public discourse are examined from the beginning of the nation to contemporary times, and the generic forms of address that have emerged from our national dialogue, such as jeremiads, inaugurals and apologies, are studied from a formistic perspective. Prerequisite: COMS 235. LEC
View current sections...
‹ First  < 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 >  Last ›

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.