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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)
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Individual and supervised readings in selected areas of African and African-American studies which will be an investigation of a subject selected by the student with the advice and direction of an instructor. Individual reports and conferences. Prerequisite: Seniors and consent of department. IND
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An individual research project in African-American or African studies under the direction of a specialist in the area of the student's interest, the results of the project to be presented in written form and to be defended before a committee of three faculty members as provided for under the requirements for Honors. Majors only and permission of instructor. IND
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A 20th-century and 21st-century study of the combined internal and external forces that precipitated the rise of Africa, the major African issues in international relations, and Africa's impact on the modern world. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A survey of politics in Africa, focused on the countries of sub-Saharan or Black Africa. The course includes a historical discussion of precolonial Africa, colonization and the creation of contemporary states, and the politics of independence, before examining contemporary political systems and the forces influencing patterns of politics on the continent. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A concentrated study of a special topic relating to African Art studies. Different topics are offered in different semesters. (Same as HA 715.) Prerequisite: Nine hours of Art History and/or consent of instructor. LEC
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Addresses the widely-held stereotype of Muslim women as pawns in a patriarchal socio-religious context. Investigating the Muslim cultures of certain regions, the course will examine the manner in which indigenous culture was influenced by the introduction of Islam and the historical impact of Islam on women's social roles. Focusing principally on contemporary social change, the course will consider how socio-political change affects religious roles where religion is integrally involved in daily life. To what extent is individualism valued, and how are the pressures of late 20th-century and early 21st-century life mediated? The course will draw on texts from history, sociology, and literature. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An examination of the barriers to effective communication between Black Americans and non-Black Americans. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Seminar in an area of current interest in African and African-American Studies. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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This course defines African American culture and identifies ways in which it is distinct. The course identifies the roots of African American culture, as well as the transformations occurring over time. The course covers identity issues and considers the possibility of complex, multi-identity structures. The course addresses the issues of whether there is a common narrative or a common root metaphor for African American culture, how this is known epistemologically, internally and externally, and how epistemological "knowledge" is appropriated. Course pedagogy includes text readings, case studies, performance events, and media events. LEC
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The course focuses on the concept of leadership and on Black leadership in the United States. An in-depth analysis of selected case studies of Black leaders both historical and contemporary. Some attention will be given to the dispersion of Africans into the Americas and the leadership that emerged, conditioned both by environmental factors and the psychology engendered by the system of slavery. Selected successful Black leaders will be invited to visit the class from time to time. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Introduction to African Literature. Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from sub-Sahara Africa. Brief attention will be paid to historical development and to traditional literature. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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This course is an introduction to 20th-century and modern Francophone African literature covering selected works by major authors from both sub-Saharan Africa and the Maghreb. Attention will be given primarily to the novel, although some poetry will also be read. Topics and themes include negritude, African identity in the wake of colonialism, Islam, and women's writing. Classes will be conducted in English. Students may read the texts in French or in translation. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Contemporary literature that is set in the context of Muslim cultures provides for an examination of Muslim identity on its own terms. This course focuses on the literary examination of works by Muslim authors from Egypt, Sudan, Senegal, Guinea, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, and Niger. From the perspective of both male and female authors, the issue of what it means to be a Muslim is considered through fictional accounts set in contemporary contexts. Some works will be read in translation from Arabic or French; others are written originally in English. Cultures considered in this course vary widely in their origins and customs, which allows for a focus on the one pervasive element they share in common: Islam as it shapes people's lives. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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This course focuses on African women's writing from all regions of the continent. Works included deal with a wide variety of issues relevant to African women, as well as universal issues of conceptions of gender roles, and the struggle to attain personal rights and freedom within traditional cultural frameworks. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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This course examines the realities of Muslim women's experiences as conveyed in their own voices. Works are drawn from all over the world, from Africa and the Middle East to Europe and the U.S. and cover from the 19th-century to the present. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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The examination of the structure, values, and behavior patterns of the contemporary African-American family as influenced by African cultures and kinship systems and the institution of slavery in association with other factors. Social and psychological forces that have enhanced or blocked family survival, stability, and advancement will be explored. The orientation of Black family life will emphasize its strengths, weaknesses, adaptations, strong kinship bonds, and equalitarian family roles. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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The intention of this course is to present a comprehensive portrait and a deeper understanding of the Arab society and its cultural background. We will focus on the debate that is still raging about traditionalism versus modernity, and authenticity (assala) and specificity (Khususiyya) versus westernization. Moreover, we will discuss the question of Arab identity which manifests itself through a sense of belonging and diversity of affiliations, and relies as well on shared culture and its variations, and shared place in history and common experiences. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Islam's origins, the prophet Muhammed, the Holy Koran, religious symbols and moral mandates, and historical developments. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A study of pop songs, television, comics, and other idioms of popular culture from different parts of the Muslim world, with attention to Muslims' sense of humor, tragedy, aesthetics, and pertinent issues of the day. LEC
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Individual investigation of special topics in African and African-American studies. May not be repeated for credit. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Examines issues and problems associated with language use in sub-Saharan Africa from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include an overview of the types of languages spoken on the continent: indigenous languages, colonial languages, pidgins and creoles, and Arabic as a religious language; problems associated with the politics of literacy and language planning, writing and standardization of indigenous languages; and the cultural and ideological dilemmas of language choice. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An intensive study of the literatures of Africa and/or African diaspora (people of African descent dispersed around the world). This study will focus on the major characteristics of a particular period, genre, mode, and/or theme in literatures such as African, Caribbean, Afro-Brazilian, African American, African Canadian, Black British. Critical theories pertinent to writers and their work will be covered. Topics may include studies in drama, poetry, or the novel; migration narratives; literature of a particular era, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Negritude, or the Black Arts Movement; representations of gender, etc. As topics vary by semester, the course may be repeated for credit. (Same as ENGL 774.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary study of the role of Black women in our society, from the African background through the plantation experience to the present. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An introduction to, and overview of, the historical, intellectual, and professional foundations of African-American Studies; a multidisciplinary examination of the key texts and issues in the field. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An introduction to, and overview of, the historical, intellectual, and professional foundations of African Studies; a multidisciplinary examination of the key texts and issues in the field. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A multidisciplinary introduction to the range of research methods employed to examine African and African-American history, cultures, and societies. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An interdisciplinary, comparative exploration of the histories, cultures, and societies of Africans and peoples of African descent. Students will be required to utilize the skills gained in AAAS 801 and AAAS 802 to design and implement a project that will be critically assessed in the seminar. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. Prerequisite: AAAS 801 and AAAS 802 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, and/or the Middle East. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An examination of the Civil Rights Movement in American History. Emphasis is placed on the activities of major Civil Rights organizations, Civil Rights legislation and its impact on American life, and conflicts between integrationist and separatist forces in politics, economics, education, culture and race relations in the United States. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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This course will examine the Black Power Movement in its many manifestations, beginning with a discussion of its political and cultural background: the transition from Civil Rights to Black Power in the Afro-American freedom movement of 1960's; the impact on African Americans of African decolonization and the spread of anti-colonial and anti-imperialist movements throughout other parts of the globe. There will also be some examination of the Black Arts Movement and its influence on the Black Power Movement and vice versa. Therefore, some attention will also be paid to the music, literature, theater, and the graphic arts of the period, and the aesthetic and political critiques of these artistic forms. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Historical development, systematic ideas and rites of selected periods, cultural settings, and movements. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive historical examination of American society's changing attitudes and responses to aging and older adults, with emphasis on the Black aged. Beginning with the African background where older adults were highly valued, the course explores the impact of slavery, the industrial Revolution, urbanization and the development of the youth-oriented culture prevalent in the United States today. Subsequently, the course focuses on the emergence of twentieth-century social gerontological problems and the role of the modern Black movements, public agencies, and private organizations in addressing the issues. Film, essays, drama, and/or fiction are utilized to illustrate the cultural attitudes of each historical period. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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This course examines multiple expressions of popular culture in contemporary Africa, focusing on the aesthetics of forms such as music, theatre, dress, street art, and popular literary genres, as well as the social themes they deal with and the societies that produce them. The approach will be based on a critical reconsideration of notions such as traditional versus modern culture, elite versus folk art, westernization, and cultural hybridity, in order to find better ways of discussing the cultural vibrancy of everyday life in contemporary Africa. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A critical examination of the life and thought of W. E. B. Du Bois, paramount black scholar and activist whose massive body of scholarly work spans the period from late 19th through the mid-20th centuries. Course covers the major works of Du Bois. Topics include Du Bois as sociologist, historian, propagandist, and creative writer, taking into account his often shifting views on art and culture, politics, leadership, civil rights and the color line, trade unionism, Pan-Africanism, socialism, internationalism, and, of course, double consciousness, among other issues. Moreover, the course will deal with Du Bois as an intellectual in conversation with other black thinkers, including individuals such as Booker T. Washington, Alexander Crummell, Anna Julia Copper, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, Marcus Garvey, E. Franklin Frazier, Walter White and Thurgood Marshall. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Reading, analysis, and discussion of contemporary fiction, poetry, and drama from Africa, the Caribbean, and the United States. Brief attention will be paid to historical development and to traditional literature. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A study of the rhetoric of Black Americans, from their earliest protest efforts to the contemporary scene, with the focus on the methods and themes employed to alter their status in American society. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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The course examines the links between language structure, patterns of use, language choice, and language attitudes in the diglossic and bi-lingual Arabic-speaking communities. It also explores language as a reflector and creator of Arab culture (e.g. linguistic encoding of politeness, the Quranic text as the spoken and written word, the role of tropes in Arabic rhetoric). The topics for discussion range from the micro-level language choice to the macro-level issues of national language policies and planning within the domain of government and education across the Arab world. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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This course seeks to unveil a complex cultural practice that has been misconstrued by many scholars. It explores the versatility of the meaning of the veil. It examines the ways in which the veil has become a symbol of privacy, cultural identity, religious assertion, resistance and liberation, besides being a symbol of constraint, oppression, backwardness, and sexual mystery. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Acquaints students with the complexities of debates on environmental problems in Sub-Saharan Africa. Topics addressed may include deforestation, desert expansion, wildlife conservation, soil erosion, climate change, coral reef destruction, water resources development, mangrove preservation, and the environmental effects of war, industrialization, and urbanization. Class presentations and projects synthesize the perspectives of both human and physical geography. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An examination of major developments in classical Islamic literature in the Middle East and beyond, with attention to the poetic and prose works (in translation) that emerged from them. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Acquaints students with the values and social parameters of African agricultural and pastoral practice. Topics include customary land rights, African perspectives on the natural world, gender issues in African agriculture, and the urbanization of African cultures. The course also contrasts African views with those of Western development practitioners and donor agencies. Case studies from different countries are used to highlight the continent's regional differences. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A critical study of Africa and its peoples as depicted in films and videos. The aesthetic, cultural, economic, political, historical, and ideological aspects of African films and videos will be examined. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An intermediate-level course in urban geography, with an emphasis on cities in the developing world. Example cities in Latin America and the Caribbean, Sub-Saharan Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, and/or Southeast Asia may be examined. The main focus is on the intersection between urbanization and economic development, but social, political, and cultural aspects of development in cities are considered. Other topics include the geographic impacts of European colonialism, urbanization and industrialization, rural-to-urban migration, urban structure and spatial dynamics, urban planning, and environmental sustainability. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An examination of the ways in which the concept of race, gender, and post-colonialism frame African literatures from the Caribbean, North America, and the continent itself. The course will focus on these discourses grounding them in critical frameworks within which they can be contextually analyzed and evaluated, at the same time examining their impact in literacy praxis and theory. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Slavery, slave culture, and the slave trade in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean will be examined comparatively. Attention will also be given to African cultures, the effects of the slave trade on Africa, and the effects of African cultures on institutions in the New World. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An interdisciplinary approach to cross-cultural understanding of Africa's place in the modern world. Specific emphasis will be given to the role of Africa in world history, African cultures, modern African history, and problems of development and nation building in Africa. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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A study of the literature written by Black Americans from the pre-Civil War period to the present. Emphasis upon specific historical periods in the development of Black literature as well as on a critical analysis of major autobiographical, poetic, and fictional works. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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The representation(s) of race in significant texts and performance styles in American theatre analyzed according to political ideologies, dramatic movements and the impact of these factors on the representation of the "other" in the theatre. LEC
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This course will deal with the fifty years of South African history during which apartheid came to be formulated, supported, and perpetuated, and the forces that were responsible for its disintegration by 1990. Reference will also be made to the transformation process since April 1994. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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An examination of the history of sexuality and gender in Africa focused on the 19th-century to the present. Major issues and methods in the historical scholarship on gender and sexuality will be covered. Topics of historical analysis include life histories, rites of passage, courtship, marriage, reproduction, education, masculinities, homosexuality, colonial control, and changing gender relations. Prior course work in African history is suggested. Additional advanced-level coursework is required for students in this course beyond lower-level courses of the same name and/or description. LEC
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Investigation and research of a topic for a master's thesis. A maximum of 6 thesis hours may be counted toward the 33 hours required for the degree. THE
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An introduction to the principles of behavioral science and their application to problems facing contemporary societies (e.g., autism, public health, education, juvenile delinquency, substance abuse). Students will learn how behavioral scientists analyze human behavior and how these analyses are used to inform interventions. Students will also learn about careers in the behavioral sciences and how to pursue them. Course may be offered in lecture or online format. LEC
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This course introduces students to the principles of scientific inquiry in applied behavioral science: objectivity, definitions, observation, reliability, validity, correlation and its limitations, causation, experimental design and analysis, and the interpretation of data. These principles are presented in the context of solving individual and societal problems across the lifespan, for example, in early childhood education, public health, developmental disabilities (e.g., autism), delinquency, independent living for people with disabilities, educational systems, and gerontology. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An introduction to rationales, methods, and findings resulting from the empirical study of human behavior. Readings, lectures, videos, and classroom demonstrations are used to illustrate various principles of behavior and techniques of application. These principles are organized into a general theory of human conduct that is contrasted with alternative explanations of human behavior. Students learn basic principles of scientific method and their implications for behavioral science and human affairs. (Formerly HDFL 140.) LEC
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An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. (Formerly HDFL 150.) LEC
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An introduction to analysis, intervention, evaluation, and leadership in contemporary problems facing local communities. Readings, lectures, and service-learning activities enable students to understand community problems and how citizens and professionals can address them. Open only to students in the University Honors Program. (Formerly HDFL 151.) LEC
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An introduction to child behavior and development with an emphasis on the normal developmental range of growth, intelligence, cognition, emotion, language, and social skills from birth to adolescence. (Formerly HDFL 160.) LEC
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This course focuses on the family unit and the factors that affect its development. Topics include dating and cohabitation; family and lifestyle diversity; parental roles and child development; divorce and stepfamilies. The course emphasizes research related to these issues. (Formerly HDFL 288.) LEC
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A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to applied behavioral science at the freshman/sophomore level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC
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An advanced examination of the principles of applied behavior analysis as used to address problems in developmental disabilities, childhood autism, language development, early childhood education, with adolescent and family life, and in normal everyday adult behavior. Issues in measurement, design, and evaluation of the effects of applied behavior analysis procedures and ethical implications of the use of these procedures are examined. Procedures used to teach and maintain appropriate behaviors, eliminate inappropriate behaviors, and develop comprehensive behavioral intervention programs are described. (Formerly HDFL 304.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101 or ABSC/HDFL 140. LEC
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Examines research methods used to identify, describe, understand, and intervene on socially important problems occurring across the life span (e.g., early childhood, adolescence, elders) and in varied settings (homes, classrooms, group-care facilities, and communities). Discusses research methods and concepts (e.g., prediction, experimental control, reliability, validity) within scientific, psychological, and behavior-analytic frameworks. Presents strategies and tactics regarding descriptive and experimental methods, direct and indirect measurement, graphical and statistical analysis, and single-subject and group experimental designs. Examines ethics and social responsibility in research. Provides opportunities to read primary and secondary sources, develop research questions, write and present research proposals, and assist in the conduct of research projects. (Formerly HDFL 308.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 140 or ABSC/HDFL 304. LEC
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This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 310.) LEC
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This course teaches knowledge and skills for addressing issues in community health and development (e.g., substance abuse, adolescent pregnancy, child and youth development, prevention of violence). Students learn core competencies such as analyzing community problems and goals, strategic planning, intervention, and evaluation. In a service-learning component, students apply these skills to issues that matter to them and to the communities they serve. (Formerly HDFL 311.) Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An overview of environmental, cultural, and biological influences of adult development and aging. Course material is organized in terms of topics, rather than presenting a chronological account. (Formerly HDFL 342.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101, ABSC/HDFL 140, ABSC/HDFL 150/151, or ABSC/HDFL 160. LEC
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Students learn about methods of teaching children with autism and about evaluating those methods. Topics include: basic methods of teaching as applied to imitation, productive and receptive language, self-help skills, and engagement in community activities, as well as observation and measurement of behavior in community settings and evaluating consumer satisfaction. The course consists of classroom lectures, discussions, demonstrations, examinations, and completion of laboratory and observation assignments. Enrollment priority is given to majors who intend to do practicum work with children with autism. (Formerly HDFL 350.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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This course introduces students to the field of early childhood education. Contemporary perspectives and professional practices are examined through an analysis of historical and philosophical ideologies. (Formerly HDFL 356.) Prerequisite: ABSC/ HDFL 160 or instructor permission. LEC
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The applied study of child development theories and research methods on the influences and effects of television and related visual media on childhood in the contexts of families, schools, and society. (Same as PSYC 405 and THR 405) (Formerly HDFL 405.) LEC
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Addresses some of the basic behavioral techniques used with juveniles who have problems in school, at home, or in the community: readings and role-playing sessions covering assessment of problems, relationship development, observing and defining behavior, teaching and contracting techniques, and counseling. (Formerly HDFL 410.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 140; ABSC/ HDFL 304 highly recommended. LEC
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Students read new materials, become more fluent with ABSC 100 content, and acquire tutoring skills. Course may not be repeated. Prerequisite: ABSC 100 and consent of the instructor and department chair. LEC
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This course examines aspects of different cultures and ethnic groups, and the definitions of gender role behavior found in them. The research literature in these areas is reviewed and the implications for early childhood education settings are studied. The course examines this literature in order to provide an increased understanding of effective approaches to educational practices directly related to the structure of society in the United States. (Formerly HDFL 433.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or instructor permission. LEC
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A multi-disciplinary seminar exploring theory, method, research, and practice in independent living. The course reviews personal and environmental factors as they relate to everyday problems affecting people with varying disabilities. It also contains service-learning activities in which students apply skills and knowledge gained in the classroom. (Formerly HDFL 437.) Prerequisite: An introductory course in social sciences or consent of the instructor. LEC
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A survey of educational materials and activities appropriate for young children. Students explore several components of effective curriculum development (e.g., objectives, methods of activity presentation, teaching strategies) and learn to integrate them to construct curricula for a range of content and skill areas. By focusing on functional components of a curriculum, students learn to construct, critically evaluate, and modify curricula for typically and atypically developing children. (Formerly HDFL 444.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 100/101, ABSC/HDFL 140, or ABSC/HDFL 304. LEC
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This course addresses children's health, safety, and nutritional needs and contemporary approaches to achieving wellness. Students develop analytical skills through reading, discussion, and application of theoretical and empirical concepts. Current research results are emphasized and applied to course problem sets and projects. (Formerly HDFL 455.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge. LEC
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A course designed for the study of special topics in applied behavioral science. Course content addresses major topics and specialized issues in the field. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. LEC
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This course offers detailed discussion of the organizational behavior management (OBM) literature including performance management, behavioral systems analysis, and behavior-based safety. This course also addresses empirically supported staff training procedures and research in implementation science. Students assist with OBM-relevant research and develop skills in both translational and applied OBM research. Prerequisite: ABSC 100. LEC
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A course designed to enhance international experience in topic areas related to topics in applied behavioral science at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Department permission. LEC
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Theoretical approaches to the study of parenting and parent-child relationships, techniques for analyzing common parenting problems, designing appropriate interventions, fostering effective communication skills, understanding issues of diversity, and promoting parent education programs. Professional collaboration and support of families and children are emphasized throughout. Students develop analytical skills through reading, discussion, and application of theoretical and empirical concepts. (Formerly HDFL 486.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or equivalent knowledge of child development or child psychology. LEC
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A course designed for directed readings in applied behavioral science. Readings address major topics and specialized issues in the field. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. (Formerly HDFL 484.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. IND
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Basic and applied research experience. The course provides training in research methods, measures, and designs, and the conduct of research, in the behavioral sciences. May be repeated for credit if the content differs. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. RSH
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This course provides a survey of modern behavioral science and its applications. It reviews the field's history; integrates its sub-disciplines; situates it within the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities; and compares and contrasts it with other perspectives. It covers recent advances in research, their implications for understanding human behavior, and their application to solving societal problems. And, it addresses the ethical implications of applied behavioral science. (Formerly HDFL/ PSYC 641.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100/101 or ABSC/HDFL 140, and ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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A review of contemporary psychological and developmental disorders of children and youth. Course presents current models of psychopathology, classification systems, assessment methods, and treatment approaches designed for the individual, the family, and the community. Specific attention is given to age, gender, and cultural differences and similarities. Topics include: anxiety disorders, oppositional behavior disorders, physical/sexual abuse, learning disabilities, depression, chronic physical illness, and autism. (Same as PSYC 535.) (Formerly HDFL 535.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or PSYC 333, or instructor permission. LEC
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This course will provide an overview of social and behavioral problems faced by older adults, people who provide for elders, and human service programs for elders. It also surveys empirically-derived intervention strategies designed to maintain abilities and reduce or eliminate problem behaviors experienced by elders or their caregivers. (Formerly HDFL 542.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 and ABSC/HDFL 308, or instructor permission. LEC
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This course provides an overview of professional, social, legal, and economic issues associated with the administration of early childhood services and programs. Emphasis is placed on theoretical principles, empirical research, and professional responsibilities inherent in the provision of quality service, including needs assessment, organizational skills, delivery systems, human resource management, communication skills, grant writing, legal and ethical considerations, and advocacy. (Formerly HDFL 555.) Prerequisite: Senior standing in the early childhood specialty area or instructor permission. LEC
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An overview of the juvenile justice system, including the history, development, and current controversy over children's rights in the legal system examined in light of relevant principles of behavioral science and behavioral systems of rehabilitation. Topics include delinquency, miscreancy, status offenses, dependent-neglected children, child abuse, and juvenile court procedures and personnel (e.g., probation officers), and rehabilitative programs. (Formerly HDFL 560.) Prerequisite: ABSC 100. LEC
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An advanced study of the application of theories and concepts of developmental and behavioral psychology to a range of specific issues and problems of childhood and adolescence. This course relies heavily on the empirical research literature. Topics include contemporary social issues and child development, research in applied settings, assessment, intervention, and prevention, as well as program evaluation. (Same as PSYC 565.) (Formerly HDFL 565.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160 or PSYC 333, and ABSC/HDFL/ PSYC 535. LEC
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A two-semester course combining small group discussions of selected, advanced topics in applied behavioral science with honors thesis supervision on a project of the student's own design. Students normally enroll for one or two hours in fall semester and three to five hours in spring semester. (Formerly HDFL 496.) Prerequisite: ABSC 304, ABSC/HDFL 308, and instructor permission. IND
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Structured opportunities to develop and apply knowledge and skills (e.g., analyzing problems, strategic planning, intervention, evaluation) in a project that addresses a community problem or goal. (Formerly HDFL 606.) Prerequisite: Instructor permission. IND
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This course reviews basic and applied research in the social, behavioral, and neural sciences on how environmental variables, brain mechanisms, individual history, and cultural constraints interact and maintain drug abuse. Topics include the mechanisms of drug action; the safety, toxicity, stimulus properties, and functional impairments related to commonly abused drugs; common models of treatment and prevention; and historical and current legislative and judicial approach to drug abuse. (Formerly HDFL 620.) Prerequisite: A course in biology and a course in either applied behavioral science or psychology. LEC
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Impact of factors of social environment and physical growth upon psychological development from puberty to young adulthood. (Same as PSYC 626.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104, PSYC 333, or HDFL/ABSC 160. LEC
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An advanced course in child development that includes a survey of the field's principles and theoretical approaches, and current issues in research and practice. Topics will include: prenatal development, cognition and language, social-emotional development, socialization influences in childhood, developmental psychopathology, and social policies. (Formerly HDFL 632.) (Same as PSYC 632.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 160, PSYC 333, or instructor permission, and senior or graduate status. LEC
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This advanced course extends knowledge and skills in analyzing behavioral problems, designing interventions, and planning applied research projects. Topics include the selection of problems and target populations, analysis of problems/goals, designing measurement systems, developing interventions, and disseminating products from applied behavioral research. (Formerly HDFL 671) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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This advanced course extends knowledge and skills in analyzing behavioral problems, designing interventions, and planning applied research projects. Topics include the selection of problems and target populations, analysis of problems/goals, designing measurement systems, developing interventions, and disseminating products from applied behavioral research. Students design an intervention research project. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program; ABSC/HDFL 304 or instructor permission. LEC
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Experience in a classroom-based early intervention and child-care program serving children younger than 3 years. Students gain practical experience with care-giving and teaching practices appropriate for typically and atypically developing children. Students learn to develop and implement individualized curricula based on assessments of children's skills. (Formerly HDFL 558.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444 (or concurrent enrollment) and instructor permission. FLD
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An advanced practicum providing experience in classroom-based early-intervention and child-care program serving children younger than 3 years. Students gain practical experience with care-giving and teaching practices appropriate for typically and atypically developing children. Students learn to develop and implement individualized curricula based on assessments of children's skills. (Formerly HDFL 559.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444, HDFL 558 or ABSC 675, and instructor permission. FLD
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A one-semester practicum providing opportunities for students to assume responsibility for the education and guidance of young children in an early childhood program. Regularly scheduled individual and staff conferences enable students to evaluate personal growth and progress as teachers of young children. (Formerly HDFL 492.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444 (or concurrent enrollment) and instructor permission. Must also meet special state requirements for child care employees and volunteers. FLD
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A one-semester advanced practicum providing opportunities for students to assume responsibility for the education and guidance of young children in an early childhood program. Regularly scheduled individual and staff conferences enable students to evaluate personal growth and progress as teachers of young children. (Formerly HDFL 493.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 444, HDFL 492 or ABSC 677, and instructor permission. Must also meet special state requirements for child care employees and volunteers. FLD
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A two-semester practicum providing opportunities for supervised training in one of several ongoing research projects in the field of behavior analysis, either basic or applied. Students assist in conducting research and participate in individual and group meetings to discuss and evaluate research and related methodological issues. (Formerly HDFL 688.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 308 and instructor permission. FLD
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Students participate in an intensive behavioral treatment program teaching language, social skills, self-help skills, and academic skills to young children with autism. Students learn: to develop and implement treatment programs; design and use of a system of data collection and analysis; and apply the principles and philosophy of community and school mainstreaming. (Formerly HDFL 550.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 350 and instructor permission. LAB
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This practicum course is designed to provide training and support practice in addressing socially significant problems and goals of community-based organizations using behavior analysis to guide assessment and intervention. Additionally, this course promotes community-university partnerships to support change and improvement in organizations through service learning. All practicum students are required to have previously completed ABSC 100 and selected applied behavioral science as a major or minor. LEC
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A one or two-semester practicum in which students are provided with the opportunity to work directly with developmentally disabled adults in either community-based residential or day treatment programs. Students are required to read relevant literature, carry out treatment programs, and participate in weekly meetings to discuss treatment goals and progress. (Formerly HDFL 696.) Prerequisite: ABSC/HDFL 304, ABSC/HDFL 410, and instructor permission. FLD
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