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Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences

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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences courses

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The aim of the course is to teach the methodologies and skills required for conducting research in the area of biomedical sciences. The learning experience will be tailored to individual needs, personalized instructions, with the opportunity to learn new skills and competencies and exposure to new developments. Depending on the selected research placement, the student will learn to: utilize a variety of basic biochemical and molecular biology laboratory skills; develop the ability to independently formulate a testable experimental hypothesis; design experiments to test formulated hypothesis in a classic application of the scientific method. Progress of the student will be monitored through weekly laboratory meetings with members of the research lab. The student will present their progress and have the ability to receive constructive feedback from laboratory members. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LBN
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Postdoctoral Studies RSH
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Effective use of language to communicate scientific ideas and concepts. Topics include: Intense use of the English language for scientific communication both written and verbal; emphasis will be placed upon verbal; proper pronunciation, grammar, sentence organization, and word choice. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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Course will provide a comprehensive overview to clinical research. The student will gain an understanding of how to develop clinical research questions including protocol design and the factors that should be considered in initiating a clinical research study. This will include biostatistical considerations, the recruitment of study participants, regulatory issues, and data management, and defining measures and instruments. Students will gain knowledge of how to define clinical research among the various institutional entities involved with clinical research at the University of Kansas Medical Center such as the Research Institute (RI), General Clinical Research Center (GCRC) and the Human Subjects Committee (HSC). Additionally, one component of the course will focus on how to apply for funding (grantsmanship), critical appraisal of research studies, and how to present research data. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
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This course is limited to non-native English speaking students who need to improve the use of the English language for both written and verbal scientific communication; emphasis will be placed upon listening and reading comprehension, grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing academic essays. Students will attend a weekly lecture and complete written homework and lab assignments. Students will also take a final exam. Class size will be limited to 20 students. Prerequisite: Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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This course is limited to non-native English speaking students who need to improve the use of the English language for both written and verbal scientific communication; emphasis will be placed upon grammar, punctuation, listening and reading comprehension, vocabulary, pronunciation, and writing academic essays. Students will attend two weekly lectures and complete written homework and lab assignments. Students will be given an exam at the end of each part of the textbook and will also take a final exam. Class size will be limited to 20 students. Prerequisites: Permission of the Instructor. LEC
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This course requires a 6 hour time commitment each week over the semester. During each weekly session the student will observe various medical practitioners in specific health care environments. The course gives the bioengineer an opportunity to see the inside of medical practice and exposes students to medical questions and challenges that could provide opportunities for engineers to contribute to the improvement of medical practice. Each student must select a concentration for this course from a health care specialty depending on availability. Some specialty options might include: Orthopedic, Radiology, Cardiology, Physical Therapy, etc. Grading will be pass/fail based on participation and journal keeping. PREREQUISITES: Graduate engineering standing, Consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is the first of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of metabolism, protein structure and an introduction to nucleic acids. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This course is the second of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of molecular genetics, DNA replication, DNA repair, transcription and translation. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 852 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This is the first semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 850 (Proteins and Metabolism) and GSMC 851 (Molecular Genetics). LEC
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This course is the third of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cellular structure and function. Topics include the lipid bilayer, membrane proteins, and cellular organelles. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This course is the fourth of four lecture units in the first year curriculum of the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. It will cover basic principles of cell communication. Topics include G-protein-coupled signaling, cellular cytoskeleton; cell cycle control; cell death; extracellular matrix; and cancer. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 855 (Introduction to Biomedical Research). LEC
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This is the second semester of a one year series in the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. The course is composed of weekly meetings to discuss research problems, methods and current literature. The course will interface with the lectures and students will learn to critically evaluate our scientific knowledge base. The students will be introduced to the tools that are available to obtain and evaluate information. The students will be challenged to identify areas of our scientific knowledge that require further experimentation and clarification. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. Students must co-enroll in GSMC 853 (Cellular Structure) and GSMC 854 (Cell Communication). LEC
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The objective of this course is to introduce students to research ethics. Students will learn and discuss some of the following areas of ethics in research: 1) sources of errors in science, 2) Scientific Fraud, 3) plagiarism and misrepresentation, 4) conflicts of interest, and 5) confidentiality. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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The objective of the course is to teach students how to organize and present data in a clear and concise manner at national meetings. Students are taught basic principles of organizing data for presentation and then learn through the actual presentation of data in simulated platform sessions held in the course. Videotapes are made of the presentations, and students are then given a constructive critique of their presentation by the instructor and fellow students. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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This course was created to provide students with sufficient introduction to the research conducted at KUMC. To facilitate this point, the course is designed as a seminar series. In each session of the series, three faculty members present a brief 20-minute overview of their research programs. The series will help students to select faculty for research rotations and ultimately help them determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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The course will introduce students to research methods, experimental design, and the types of biomedical research conducted at KUMC. The first research rotation begins halfway through the first semester; the second and third research rotations will occur in the second semester. It is designed to help students determine which faculty member they will select as a research adviser for their doctoral research. Prerequisites: Permission of instructors. Students must be admitted into the Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in the Biomedical Sciences. LEC
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