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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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Interdisciplinary study of different aspects of women's studies in different semesters. LEC
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A research seminar in women's studies. Instructor and topic will vary. LEC
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This seminar is intended primarily for graduate students in anthropology or other disciplines who share an interest in any of the subdisciplines of anthropology (archaeology, linguistics, biological anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology) and/or anthropological theories and methods. Undergraduates pursuing Honors or other major research projects are also encouraged to participate. Students will receive training in the contemporary theories, research, and pedagogies informing the anthropology of gender. Class participants will explore how these materials intersect with their current thesis or research projects and develop syllabi specific to their subdiscipline. (Same as ANTH 789). Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Directed reading in an area of women's studies in which there is no appropriate course in the offerings of the Women's Studies Program, but in which there is a member of the cooperating graduate faculty competent and willing to direct the program of study. RSH
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An introduction to the field of women, gender, and sexuality studies, paying particular attention to its development, its reception by and influence on academic disciplines, and its institutionalization. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. SEM
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A survey of contemporary feminist theories produced within and across disciplines (including but not limited to, eco-feminism, and liberal, cultural, materialist, psychoanalytic, radical, and black feminist thought). Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the methods used in feminist research in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences (e.g., quantitative and qualitative research methods, archival research, and oral histories). We will consider examples of applications of each method, the strengths and limitations of each method, and how each method relates to feminist theories and principles. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. SEM
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The goal of the course is to teach students to teach. By reading core texts of feminist pedagogy, understanding critical theories, and attending seminars at the Center for Teaching Excellence selected by instructor and student, students will learn how to present knowledge and stimulate learning in the classroom, as well as such practical skills as leading discussion sections, preparing and presenting class sessions, developing syllabi, devising fair grading and helpful advising, and solving pedagogical problems like maintaining civility in the classroom and coping with academic misconduct. Must be repeated twice for a total of 1 credit hour while actively teaching. Prerequisite: Must be Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate students. SEM
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The goal of this course is to train students in the skills essential to becoming effective scholars and educators, and successful members of the profession. The material to be covered by these three iterations includes 1) the ethics and practice of feminist research (e.g., protection of human subjects, conflicts of interest, confidentiality, legal strictures); 2) the practical aspects of producing knowledge (e.g., writing research papers, proper citation methods, conference presenting, responding to peer reviews); and 3) acquiring and securing a place in the work force (e.g., CV preparation, job interviews, grant writing, getting promotion [and, in the academy, tenure]). Must be repeated three times for a total of 3 credit hours. Prerequisite: Must be Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies graduate students. SEM
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Employing an interdisciplinary and comparative perspective, this course introduces the study of human sexuality in various disciplines. Students will also gain an understanding of the historical development and cross-cultural analysis of sexuality research, including the methodological, theoretical, and ethical issues involved in investigating sexual behavior and meanings. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of the instructor. SEM
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This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of manhood, womanhood, and gender systems. (Same as AMS 835 and HIST 895.) LEC
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This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. It is designed to familiarize students with the most important and current historiography in the field. (Same as AMS 836 and HIST 896.) LEC
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This colloquium will approach the history of women from a comparative perspective through theoretical and topical readings on women in at least two different cultures. (Same as AMS 837 and HIST 897.) LEC
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This research seminar will focus on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. Students will research and write a paper using primary sources, and present those papers to the seminar for evaluation. (Same as HIST 973 and AMS 973.) LEC
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Intensive consideration of special problems in feminist anthropology. Topics for the semester to be announced. May be repeated for a total of six hours credit. (Same as ANTH 880.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is the "capstone" to the Women's Studies Graduate Certificate program. Members of the seminar will produce a major paper and will share their research. During the first part of the term a small number of visitors (professors at KU and/or visiting speakers from other universities) will be invited to assign readings and subsequently present their work on women and gender. Students will be expected to attend the Gender Seminar of the Hall Center for the Humanities. Prerequisite: WGSS 801 and at least 3 hours of other graduate work in the Women's Studies graduate certificate program, or by special permission. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Wolof. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. A continuation of WOLO 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: WOLO 110. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Wolof. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Wolof texts and discussion in Wolof. Prerequisite: WOLO 120. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Wolof. Continuation of WOLO 210. Discussion in Wolof of texts studied. Prerequisite: WOLO 210. LEC
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A practical Wolof language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Wolof. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Wolof study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: WOLO 220 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of WOLO 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of WOLO 310 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentations, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of WOLO 401. LEC
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Aspects of Wolof literature are examined at an advanced level, including differences between oral and written narrative, oral and poetic modes, varieties of registers as determined by gender and socio-economic level, and the effect of medium on literary style. Prerequisite: Native, near-native or second language competence, or satisfactory completion of fourth level language proficiency. LEC
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Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking, reading, and writing Yiddish. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of Yiddish. LEC
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Continuation of grammar, practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five hours of recitation per week. Not open to native speakers of Yiddish. Prerequisite: YDSH 104 or equivalent. LEC
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Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Yiddish. Prerequisite: YDSH 108 or equivalent. LEC
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A continuation of YDSH 212. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Yiddish. Prerequisite: YDSH 212 or equivalent. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of Yiddish. LEC
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