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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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Guided discussions designed to increase fluency and further improve pronunciation. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent. LEC
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Readings in Chinese on a subject selected by a student with the advice and direction of the instructor. Individual meetings and reports. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Five hours of class and two of drill. Readings in selected modern Chinese literary texts and discussion in Chinese of recordings of stories and dramas. Prerequisite: CHIN 208 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of CHIN 504. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent. LEC
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Readings in modern Chinese texts on a variety of subjects and discussion in Chinese. Prerequisite: CHIN 218 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of CHIN 512. Prerequisite: CHIN 512 or equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to Classical Chinese through detailed analysis of short original passages from a variety of early Chinese texts. Students gain a foundation in the grammar and vocabulary of Classical Chinese, preparing them for CHIN 544. The course is offered at the 300 and 500 levels, with additional requirements for students taking CHIN 542. Prerequisite: A basic knowledge of Chinese characters (e.g. from CHIN 108 or JPN 108) and consent of instructor, or CHIN 208 or JPN 208. Not open to students who have completed CHIN 342. LEC
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Classical Chinese is the language of the most famous works of Chinese philosophy and most Chinese literature before the twentieth century. The course introduces readings from a specific philosophical school or literary genre, for example: Confucian Philosophical Texts, Daoist Philosophical Texts, Poetry, Ming/Qing fiction, etc. Prerequisite: CHIN 342 or CHIN 542 or consent of the instructor. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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Readings and interpretation of varied modern Chinese texts. Continued study of the language in the form of oral discussion and written reports. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent. LEC
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A continuation of CHIN 562 with materials of increasing difficulty. Prerequisite: CHIN 562. LEC
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An introduction to basic reference works in Chinese and Western languages, including dictionaries, encyclopedias, concordances, and bibliographies. Library organization and research methods will also be discussed. (Five week course.) Prerequisite: CHIN 208 or equivalent. LEC
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Students will read selections from materials on a given topic or topics. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: CHIN 564 or permission of instructor. IND
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Varying topics with varying prerequisites. LEC
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Advanced language training for the study of Chinese sources in the humanities or social science field of the student. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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A detailed examination of various Chinese language reference works and research materials. Emphasis will be placed on the use of different types of reference works to carry out research strategies. Prerequisite: CHIN 504 or equivalent and CHIN 580. LEC
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A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. LEC
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The study of Greek and Roman mythology through extensive readings in primary classical texts and secondary authors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the history, methods, and excavation techniques of archaeology, with special emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include stratigraphy, chronology, artifact analysis, the role of archaeology in our understanding of Greek and Roman society, and the treatment of archaeology in popular culture. Illustrated throughout with presentations of important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean such as Athens and Pompeii, from the earliest times through late antiquity. LEC
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An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be writers of poetry and prose such as Homer, Sappho, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, athletics, oral performance, sexuality, and the development of literary genres. No knowledge of Greek required and no prerequisite. LEC
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A study of English words drawn from Greek and Latin for all those interested in the sources of the English vocabulary. Enough Greek and Latin for essential purposes is also studied. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC
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An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be authors such as Plautus, Vergil, Livy, Petronius, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, oratory, slavery, political propaganda, the Roman games, and the development of Roman literature. No knowledge of Latin required and no prerequisite. LEC
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A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E.- 500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA 526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as HA 317, HWC 317.) LEC
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Honors version of CLSX 230. An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of the terminology of science with reference to its debt to the Greek and Latin languages. While all the natural sciences will be treated, there will be some emphasis on the biological sciences. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC
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Honors version of CLSX 240. An introduction to ancient Roman Literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Roman texts. No knowledge of Latin required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as HWC 380.) LEC
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Honors version of CLSX 151, with the focus towards critical approaches and research. Special attention is paid to recent methodological, theoretical, and ethical debates within the profession of Classical archaeology. Assignments and activities may include position papers on contentious issues of the day, research assignments, and/or field trips to museums and related institutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern notions and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required: (Same as HWC 374.) LEC
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Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides will be read in translation. The criticism of the plays, and the role they play in Athenian (and Greek) culture of the 5th century. This course includes the Oresteia, Oedipus Tyrannus, Antigone, and Medea. No knowledge of Greek is required. LEC
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The later plays of Euripides and Sophocles, selected plays by the comic dramatist Aristophanes, and passages from the historian Thucydides. Criticism of the plays, and discussion of themes common to literature and history in this period. The dissolution of a high culture. CLSX 384 is NOT a prerequisite. No knowledge of Greek required. LEC
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An examination covering the six areas of course work and reading for the Classical Antiquity major, to be taken by the student pursuing the major in the last semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: A declared major in Classical Antiquity and status as a graduating senior. IND
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Under the supervision of an advisor in Classics, the student will do extensive reading in the area of Classics generously defined, to result in two or more papers as agreed upon between faculty and student. IND
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Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Classical literature, culture, or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND
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The place of Latin among the Indo-European languages and the languages of Italy, its development as a literary medium, and how it changed in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar from its beginnings through the Medieval period. LEC
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Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as HIST 502). LEC
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This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Greek antiquity. Contents will vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 515.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
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An interdisciplinary survey of the major cultures of the prehistoric Aegean (Greek) world from the Neolithic period to the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1100 B.C.E.), with special emphasis on the cultural and artistic achievements of the Mycenaeans, Minoans, and Cycladic islanders, including their contacts with the neighboring cultures of Anatolia (Hittites and Troy), the Levant, Egypt, and South Italy. Includes lecture with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 525.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of the ancient Greek world from the Protogeometric period to the end of the Hellenistic age (ca. 1100 - 30 B.C.E.), with emphasis on the major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression (e.g., architecture, sculpture, vase painting). Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 526.) LEC
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An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of ancient Rome from its origins to the late empire (8th c.B.C.E. - 4th c.C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression, as well as on Etruscan and Greek influence on Rome and Rome's influence on its provinces. Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities; and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). (Same as HA 537.) LEC
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A cross-cultural survey of the material remains of the major civilizations of the ancient Near East, including Anatolia, Mesopotamia, the Levant, and Egypt from Neolithic period to the rise of the Roman empire (ca. 6000 B.C.E. - 30 B.C.E.). Includes lectures with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 529.) LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in Classics at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only six hours may count toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, genre, or period of literature from the ancient classical world. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC
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Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, medium, region, or period in the archaeology and art of the ancient Near Eastern and classical world. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC
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Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Attendance at CLSX 384 required, plus one seminar per week, discussing the scholarly background of the major lecture, as well as the problems and aims of teaching Greek drama in English to undergraduates. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH
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A continuation of CLSX 717. Attendance at CLSX 388 plus one seminar per week. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH
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Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Classics courses. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
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Thesis hours. THE
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Survey of the major areas of the Communication Studies field. Provides an overview of communication theory and research methods, and introduces key topics, approaches, and applications in core areas such as rhetoric, organizational communication, interpersonal communication, intercultural communication, and communication technology. LEC
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Study of rhetorical theory and its application to the preparation, presentation, and criticism of oral discourse in audience situations. Special consideration of listening behavior and of the ethical conduct of speech in a free society. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. LEC
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The study of rhetorical theory and its application to the preparation, presentation, and criticism of oral discourse in audience situations. Special consideration of listening behavior and of the ethical conduct of speech in a free society. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. This is an honors section of COMS 130 open only to students in the Honors Program. LEC
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This course is an introduction to communication theory, process, and skill. The course seeks to increase the student's understanding of communication theory, both interpersonal and public, and of his or her own communicative behavior. Class projects and participation urge students to apply this theoretical knowledge to a variety of settings, including interpersonal and addressing groups and audiences. This course does not fulfill the College argument and reason requirement. Not open to those who have credit in COMS 130. LEC
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This course introduces students to the study of the leadership process. Course covers theories and research on core themes of leadership, focusing on how course materials relates to students' own leadership experiences. Not open to seniors. LEC
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Introduction to the principles of debating. Emphasis on debating techniques, analysis of the question, methods of using evidence, refutation, and brief making. This course fulfills the College argument and reason requirement. LEC
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For students selected by faculty supervisor for work on university debate squad. Students to enroll at time of their selection. Recurring enrollments permitted. FLD
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This course examines in detail the texts of speeches and essays on controversial issues in order to illustrate the varied forms of rhetorical action and the diverse modes of analysis and evaluation that can be applied to them. Examples are drawn from the rhetorical literature of contemporary U.S. speakers and prose writers. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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Examines basic theoretical perspectives and research on verbal and nonverbal communication elements affecting communication between individuals in a variety of contexts. Topics include communication competence, developmental aspects of interpersonal communication, and interpersonal influence. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course attempts to provide an understanding of communication as it affects culture and as it is affected by culture. Special emphasis will be placed on the principle of similarity and differences as it relates to the roles of verbal and non-verbal symbols, codes, and cues, stereotypes, prejudices and value and thought patterning systems between and among cultures. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course provides a foundation for the study of communication in organizational contexts. It introduces students to various organization theories including classical, human relations, systems, and cultural approaches and examines the role of communication in each. Information flow, communication climate, communication networks, work relationships and managerial communication are discussed as well as organizational symbolism, conflict resolution, rituals and ethics. The course is designed to heighten students' awareness of the role of communication in the organizing process and to develop their abilities to diagnose and prevent communication-related problems. Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC
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This course introduces social and communication issues in the context of online interaction. Surveys a range of social internet technologies (e.g., newsgroups, chat, MUDs, etc.). Focus is on the interpersonal topics, including the establishment and maintenance of individual and cultural identities, personal relationships, the emergence of online communities, power and conflict in online groups, language use in online contexts, and how online groups are used to enhance or alter civic and global cultures. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to develop effective written, spoken, and electronically mediated communication skills necessary for business. Students will write short technical reports, plan meetings and conferences, prepare and present briefings and persuasive proposals with visual aids, and examine the use of new communication technologies. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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Guided experiences in the preparation and presentation of discourse intended to influence outcomes of human interactions in various speaker-audience situations, including television. Special emphasis on speech styles in influencing thought, attitudes, and behavior. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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Historical survey of theories of communication and persuasion, the people who produced them, and the philosophical assumptions upon which they rest. Beginning with the Greeks, especially Plato and Aristotle, and ending with selections from Kenneth Burke and other contemporary figures, the course focuses on changing concepts of rhetoric throughout a time span of some 2000 years. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course investigates the ways in which rhetorical strategies (persuasive and linguistic usage) permeate the relationship between politics and politicians and the mass media. We will analyze media coverage of political debates, the presidential use of radio, television and press conferences, and the network evening news coverage of political events to see how political decisions are influenced by and influence the media. (Same as POLS 521.) Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC
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This course introduces basic concepts important to leading and/or participating in problem-solving work teams. Problem identification and analysis and leadership are emphasized and practiced. Teamwork variables are discussed and promoted. Lecture, demonstrations, exercises in class are structure for students to analyze groups outside of class. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course studies communication issues, theories, research and skills applicable to sustaining and enriching long-term relationships, such as families, friendships and close workplace collaborations. Emphasis is given to applying course concepts to students' own relationships and interaction in class. Prerequisite: COMS 244. LEC
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An introduction to the nature of theory and theory building in the study of human communication. Research methods include experimentation, survey, content analysis, and field description. An introduction to statistics and statistical tests is included as well. Prerequisite: MATH 101 and admission to the Communication Studies major or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of dyadic level communication in organizations, with emphasis on contexts of superior-subordinate and peer communication. The course also addresses contexts of organizational entry and exit, perception and judgment, information seeking, feedback, and organizational attachment. Prerequisite: COMS 310. LEC
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An exploration of the communication patterns and challenges between organizational groups and organizations as a whole. Key elements include networks, boundary spanning, inter-organizational collaboration, and the role of technology in linking large organizational components. Prerequisite: COMS 310 or instructor permission. LEC
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Examination of the communication challenges faced by distributed organizations, especially those with a global presence. Topics include telework, virtual terms, and new processes required to support interaction among people located in several different places. Prerequisite: COMS 310 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Examines the social, cultural, and economic challenges and opportunities advanced communication technologies and globalization pose to processes such as democratic deliberation, urban governance, and environmental sustainability. Prerequisite: COMS 130. LEC
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This course provides an overview of the role of communication in leadership in a variety of contexts, including: interpersonal, small group, intercultural, organizational, and public sphere. It will include theoretical and experiential approaches to effective leadership communication. Prerequisite: Admission to Leadership Minor or consent of instructor. LEC
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Changing styles of public discourse are examined from the beginning of the nation to contemporary times, and the generic forms of address that have emerged from our national dialogue, such as jeremiads, inaugurals and apologies, are studied from a formistic perspective. Prerequisite: COMS 235. LEC
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Focuses attention on the relationship between communication and gender, including both physical and psychological dimensions. Topics include: sex role orientations and stereotypes; perceived and actual differences in verbal and nonverbal communication behaviors; the influence of gender on communication in a variety of contexts. (Same as WGSS 440.) Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course is a survey of the many disciplines found in the field of health communication, including persuasion that targets health-related behavior, negotiation of treatment with health care providers, emotional support of patients, news media coverage of medical research, and health campaign principles. Prerequisite: COMS 130. LEC
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An examination of the barriers to effective communication between black Americans and non-black Americans. (Same as AAAS 420.) Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. (Distribution credit given for two or three hours only.) LEC
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Course organized any given semester to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by an individual faculty member. Topics change as needs and resources develop. Class discussion, readings, and individual projects. (Distribution credit given for two or three hour enrollments only.) LEC
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This course is intended for honor students who want to learn more about the history of communication studies, major areas of research, or more in-depth knowledge about special communication-related topics. Areas to be covered may change as needs and resources change. LEC
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(Six hours maximum credit, which may be distributed through two semesters.) Study should include readings directed toward original research, i.e., an intensive investigation of a specific problem in this field. Prerequisite: Consent of the Department Honors Committee. IND
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(A maximum of six hours of credit may be counted, with not more than four in a single area of study.) Investigation of a special topic or project selected by the student with advice, approval, and supervision of an instructor. Such study may take the form of directed reading, or special research, individual reports and conferences. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) Prerequisite: At least seven hours of credit in the department and consent of instructor. IND
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This course is designed to acquaint students with the shifting manner of public discourse in Post-Soviet Russia and help them to explore in some depth cross-cultural communication between America and Russia. In addition to contemporary and historical background on Russian communicative practices, students examine discourse in business development, mass media, marketing, and advertising. All readings in English. (Same as SLAV 503). LEC
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Examination of the ways in which American presidents communicate with the American people and how such communication influences the public. Emphasis is on a number of approaches to better understanding presidential communication, including rhetorical, historical, and content analysis. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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Students do communication-centered fieldwork in an organization related to their career goals. Criteria for the organizations and work assignments suitable for internship credit are in an information brochure available at the COMS Department office and website. The internship plan is developed with field supervisor and internship faculty adviser. Reports and meetings are required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor, admission to COMS major. FLD
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This seminar serves as the capstone course for the Leadership Studies minor. It includes advanced readings on leadership theory and practice, as well as major written and applied projects in which students integrate and demonstrate what they have learned in the program. Prerequisite: COMS 201, COMS 431, and admission to the Leadership Studies minor. LEC
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Students engage in a variety of training programs and field experiences in which they learn about leadership, observe leaders in action, and involve themselves in leadership activities. Written assignments and group discussions are used to analyze their learning. Should be taken for a total of three credit hours, across more than one semester. Prerequisite: COMS 201 and admission to the Leadership Studies minor. FLD
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A history of American public address from the Puritans to about 1900. Using the tools of rhetorical criticism, students describe, analyze, and evaluate select rhetoric from the period. Graduate students are assigned extra reading and a research paper. Prerequisite: COMS 235. LEC
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A history of American public address from 1900 to the present. Using the tools of rhetorical criticism, students describe, analyze, and evaluate select rhetoric from the period. Graduate students are assigned extra reading and a research paper. Prerequisite: COMS 235. LEC
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An examination of conflict situations and the manner in which communication can serve as a vehicle for their intensification or resolution. The focus is on the theory of games as it applies to conflict within interpersonal situations; implications will be drawn for larger social systems. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course focuses on the social scientific study of persuasion. Traditional theories of attitude change and persuasion research are studied along with techniques of measuring attitudes. Attention is also given to the attitude-behavior relationship and the production of compliance-gaining messages. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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Analysis of the theory and techniques of argumentation in historical and contemporary writings, with special emphasis on the works of Aristotle, John Stuart Mill, Richard Whateley, and Stephen Toulmin. Application of argumentation theory to political and legal discourse. Opportunity for student performances in the preparation and criticism of argument. Prerequisite: Four hours in the department. LEC
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Theory and practice in leadership of small group interaction. Includes responsibility for conducting a semester-long series of group meetings in an educational context under the supervision of faculty, study and training in leadership skills, a weekly practicum seminar, and individual conferences with supervising instructor. May be taken more than once, but not for more than four hours total credit. (Distribution credit given for two-three hours only.) Prerequisite: COMS 344, COMS 455, and permission of instructor. FLD
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Intensive exploration of contemporary theories and research in the field of interpersonal communication; emphasis on an array of theoretical models and research exemplars; comparative analysis of major theoretical and research paradigms. Prerequisite: COMS 244 or instructor consent. LEC
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Examination of the ways in which communication changes across the life-span, and influences human development. Course will include topics such as barriers to communication among elderly populations; communication and mis-communication across generations; the role of language in constructing life-span development (e.g., the mid-life crisis); development of language and social interaction during childhood; peer relationships and communication in adolescence; uses and effects of mass communication across the life-span. Prerequisite: COMS 244 and COMS 356. LEC
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A study of the systematic relationship between communication and culture. Emphasis is on culture as a variable in communicative situations: cultural aspects of attitude and cognition, language interchange, cultural differences in extra-verbal behavior, interaction between oral traditions and mass media. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, COMS 230, or an introduction course in anthropology. LEC
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Comprehensive study of communication processes in dyadic, face-to-face situations commonly encountered in organizations and professional environments. Intensive analysis of simulated and real-life interviews. Prerequisite: COMS 130, COMS 150, or COMS 230. LEC
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This course will deal with communication between organizational personnel and their customers or clients. Case studies and research concerning communication behaviors of service providers and salespeople will be covered. Prerequisite: COMS 310. LEC
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