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European Studies Program

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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All European Studies courses

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This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the 100-level (Freshman/Sophomore level). Coursework must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty advisor in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as HWC 302.) LEC
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A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and PCS 329.) LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the Junior/Senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty advisor in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Western Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and non-business majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. (Same as IBUS 305.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. LEC
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An introduction to the literature of encounter between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as HWC 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
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Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. (Same as HWC 435.) LEC
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Provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of modern European civilization. By discussing both classic and contemporary, controversial readings each week and writing several papers during the semester, students acquire an understanding of the development of modern European culture and society and Europe's contemporary problems. Topics for discussions and papers are drawn from the following subjects: the economic and political integration of European states; modernism and anti-modernism in European culture; imperialism, migration, and ethnic and racial division in European society; democracy versus dictatorship; American-European relations; mass culture, urban development, and the welfare state; and contrasts and comparisons between European Cultures--East and West, North and South. Seminar discussions are led by invited European Studies faculty as well as the instructor or instructors. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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European Studies majors will do research and write a substantial paper on a topic in the culture, economy, history, or politics of Europe. Topics will be approved by the European Studies Committee. Students will work with an advisor chosen from among the European Studies faculty and with the European Studies Coordinator. The majority of the students' work will be done independently with their advisors, but students will meet with the European Studies Coordinator several times as a class to report on their progress and present their final drafts. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500 and 15 hours toward the Co-Major. IND
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Open to European Studies majors doing their senior thesis for Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500, 15 hours toward the Co-Major, and approval of Honors thesis by European Studies Committee. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EURS 501. IND
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This intensive, interdisciplinary seminar focuses on current social, political, and economic changes in Europe. Topics include European integration and the European Union, the conflict between nationalism and European consciousness, NATO and U.S.-European relations, and international business in Europe. The seminar will include guest lectures from an international array of scholars, political officials, and business representatives, as well as site visits to their institutions and companies. The seminar takes place in Brussels, Belgium, and enrollment is restricted to students accepted in the KU Summer Institute for European Studies study abroad program. LEC
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A multidisciplinary study of selected literary, scholarly, and creative works produced by those Europeans forced into exile, emphasizing their impact on culture and society both in Europe and in those countries in which the exiles resided. Examples: exile during the Nazi dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945), during Cold War crises (Berlin 1960, Prague 1968). LEC
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An interdisciplinary overview of the Cold War period (1945-1985) focusing on Western European dimensions of the problem, based on the view that the Cold War structured political institutions, cultures, and societies in enduring ways that continue to be relevant today. LEC
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This course allows students in the European Studies Co-Major and related disciplines to receive credit for research related to European Collections in one or more of the following institutions: Watson and Spencer Research Libraries, the Dole Institute, the Eisenhower and Truman Presidential Libraries, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Research and Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth, the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, and the Winston Churchill Collection at the Westminster College Library in Fulton, Missouri. May be taken in place of EURS 501 by European Studies Honors Students if taken for three credit hours. Permission of instructor necessary. IND
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Artists and intellectuals in their relation to state and society. This course is designed to introduce students (1) to the role European artists and intellectuals have often played in the arena of politics and (2) to the privileged place cultural production (arts, literature, media) occupies in the formation of various European identities and economies. LEC
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Social, historical, and economic study of Southern European societies with emphasis on modern period. Relevant to the study of European integration and EU enlargement. Consideration of the distinctive southern Mediterranean societies from the perspective of their collective identity as a regional economic and geopolitical bloc. LEC
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This course is designed to impart a general knowledge of life in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden with emphasis on social and cultural conditions, against a geographical and historical background, from the Viking Age to the present. Slides and other illustrated materials. (Same as SCAN 570.) LEC
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A study of significant themes, movements, or problems in European history, literature, politics, society, or culture. May also relate European issues to issues in other world areas (Africa, North America, Asia, etc.) May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC
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Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 530.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of the economies of the European Union, with a focus on the economic development of the member states since World War II, and an examination of the various economic issues confronting them today. (Same as ECON 536) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 144. LEC
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A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1516) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as PCS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
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Examines in literature, art, and film from about 1800 to the present, both sides of the ongoing debate surrounding the idea that all human persons possess inalienable rights because all persons possess intrinsic value as persons, value independent of race, gender, caste or class, wealth, age, sexual preference, etc. Anti- and pro-rights proponents are paired and studied with equal care. (Same as PCS 565.) LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
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The European Union, the union of 27 European countries, is a culmination of a long history of European unity. The European Union now encompasses population and economic strength rivalling that of the United States. This course examines selected topics in the history of European integration and the political, legal, economic, and social implications of the present European Union as well as its relations with the United States and other regions of the world. LEC
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