All schools & programs > College of Liberal Arts and Sciences >

Department of Classics

Visit their website » Print...

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Classics courses

Show courses in Classics with a course number to
worth in .

There are 83 results.

A systematic examination of the traditional cycles of Greek myth and their survival and metamorphosis in Latin literature. Some attention is given to the problems of comparative mythology and the related areas of archaeology and history. Slides and other illustrated materials. No knowledge of Latin or Greek is required. LEC
View current sections...
The study of Greek and Roman mythology through extensive readings in primary classical texts and secondary authors. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the history, methods, and excavation techniques of archaeology, with special emphasis on ancient Greece and Rome. Topics include stratigraphy, chronology, artifact analysis, the role of archaeology in our understanding of Greek and Roman society, and the treatment of archaeology in popular culture. Illustrated throughout with presentations of important archaeological sites of the ancient Mediterranean such as Athens and Pompeii, from the earliest times through late antiquity. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be writers of poetry and prose such as Homer, Sappho, the tragedians, Aristophanes, Plato, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, athletics, oral performance, sexuality, and the development of literary genres. No knowledge of Greek required and no prerequisite. LEC
View current sections...
A study of English words drawn from Greek and Latin for all those interested in the sources of the English vocabulary. Enough Greek and Latin for essential purposes is also studied. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to ancient Roman literature and civilization. Studied against the historical and cultural background of their times will be authors such as Plautus, Vergil, Livy, Petronius, and topics arising from the texts such as religion, oratory, slavery, political propaganda, the Roman games, and the development of Roman literature. No knowledge of Latin required and no prerequisite. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E.- 500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA 526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as HA 317, HWC 317.) LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of CLSX 230. An introduction to ancient Greek literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Greek texts. No knowledge of Greek required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the terminology of science with reference to its debt to the Greek and Latin languages. While all the natural sciences will be treated, there will be some emphasis on the biological sciences. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. A student may not receive credit for both CLSX 232 and CLSX 332. LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of CLSX 240. An introduction to ancient Roman Literature and civilization through extensive readings in primary Roman texts. No knowledge of Latin required. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as HWC 380.) LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of CLSX 151, with the focus towards critical approaches and research. Special attention is paid to recent methodological, theoretical, and ethical debates within the profession of Classical archaeology. Assignments and activities may include position papers on contentious issues of the day, research assignments, and/or field trips to museums and related institutions. Prerequisite: Admission to the Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern notions and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required: (Same as HWC 374.) LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides will be read in translation. The criticism of the plays, and the role they play in Athenian (and Greek) culture of the 5th century. This course includes the Oresteia, Oedipus Tyrannus, Antigone, and Medea. No knowledge of Greek is required. LEC
View current sections...
The later plays of Euripides and Sophocles, selected plays by the comic dramatist Aristophanes, and passages from the historian Thucydides. Criticism of the plays, and discussion of themes common to literature and history in this period. The dissolution of a high culture. CLSX 384 is NOT a prerequisite. No knowledge of Greek required. LEC
View current sections...
An examination covering the six areas of course work and reading for the Classical Antiquity major, to be taken by the student pursuing the major in the last semester of the senior year. Prerequisite: A declared major in Classical Antiquity and status as a graduating senior. IND
View current sections...
Under the supervision of an advisor in Classics, the student will do extensive reading in the area of Classics generously defined, to result in two or more papers as agreed upon between faculty and student. IND
View current sections...
Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Classical literature, culture, or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND
View current sections...
The place of Latin among the Indo-European languages and the languages of Italy, its development as a literary medium, and how it changed in pronunciation, vocabulary, and grammar from its beginnings through the Medieval period. LEC
View current sections...
Emphasis on the ancient sources and texts, developments in political institutions and society, the changing definitions of personal, cultural, and national identities, and the cultural tensions between Greece and the cultures to the west and east, especially Italy and Persia. No knowledge of the ancient languages is required. (Same as HIST 502). LEC
View current sections...
This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Greek antiquity. Contents will vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 515.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores various approaches to the study of gender and sexuality in Roman antiquity. Contents vary, and the course may focus on methodology and case studies, or on particular themes, historical periods, or artistic or literary genres. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as WGSS 516.) Prerequisite: Graduate status, or 6 credit hours in Classics, Greek, Latin, or Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies; or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary survey of the major cultures of the prehistoric Aegean (Greek) world from the Neolithic period to the end of the Bronze Age (ca. 3000-1100 B.C.E.), with special emphasis on the cultural and artistic achievements of the Mycenaeans, Minoans, and Cycladic islanders, including their contacts with the neighboring cultures of Anatolia (Hittites and Troy), the Levant, Egypt, and South Italy. Includes lecture with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 525.) LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of the ancient Greek world from the Protogeometric period to the end of the Hellenistic age (ca. 1100 - 30 B.C.E.), with emphasis on the major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression (e.g., architecture, sculpture, vase painting). Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 526.) LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary survey of the material culture of ancient Rome from its origins to the late empire (8th c.B.C.E. - 4th c.C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, monuments, and changing forms of social and artistic expression, as well as on Etruscan and Greek influence on Rome and Rome's influence on its provinces. Includes lectures with slides and discussion; use of the Wilcox Museum of Classical Antiquities. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities; and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). (Same as HA 537.) LEC
View current sections...
A cross-cultural survey of the material remains of the major civilizations of the ancient Near East, including Anatolia, Mesopotamia, the Levant, and Egypt from Neolithic period to the rise of the Roman empire (ca. 6000 B.C.E. - 30 B.C.E.). Includes lectures with slides and discussion. For advanced undergraduates with backgrounds in the humanities and for graduate students (especially in Classics and History of Art). No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as HA 529.) LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Classics at the junior/senior level. Coursework must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only six hours may count toward the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, genre, or period of literature from the ancient classical world. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC
View current sections...
Lecture and discussion course focusing on a theme, medium, region, or period in the archaeology and art of the ancient Near Eastern and classical world. May be repeated for credit if topic varies. Only 6 hours may count toward the major. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings in Greek and Roman antiquity and the classical tradition for students who desire special work on a flexible basis. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Attendance at CLSX 384 required, plus one seminar per week, discussing the scholarly background of the major lecture, as well as the problems and aims of teaching Greek drama in English to undergraduates. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH
View current sections...
A continuation of CLSX 717. Attendance at CLSX 388 plus one seminar per week. No knowledge of Greek is required. RSH
View current sections...
Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Classics courses. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
View current sections...
Thesis hours. THE
View current sections...
The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. LEC
View current sections...
The essentials of ancient Greek grammar, with readings. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A continuation of Greek 104, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or GRK 105. LEC
View current sections...
A continuation of GRK 105, with extensive readings from one or more classical authors. Prerequisite: GRK 104 or 105; and membership in the University Honors Program or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review and selected texts from Plato and Euripides. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109 or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Plato, Aristotle and the Attic orators, with attention to issues of interpretation and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and the lyric poets, with attention to issues of literary interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with readings selected from the historians Herodotus, Thucydides, and Xenophon, as well as from the Greek novels and the New Testament. Attention will be given to issues of interpretation and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or GRK 109. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Homer's Odyssey, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Homer's Iliad, with attention to issues of literary translation and interpretation, performance, and social and cultural history. Prerequisite: GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303. LEC
View current sections...
Readings in classical Greek texts. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: GRK 108 or the equivalent. IND
View current sections...
Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Greek literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND
View current sections...
A study of the doctrines of Greek philosophy before Plato. Emphasis on the Pre-Socratic philosophers with some attention paid to the Sophists and the Hippocratic Corpus. (Same as PHIL 508.) Prerequisite: PHIL 384, or GRK 301, or GRK 302, or GRK 303, or GRK 310, or GRK 312, or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from Homer, Hesiod, Pindar, the lyric poets. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from Herodotus, Thucydides, Xenophon, Attic orators. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from Plato, Aristotle, the Pre-Socratics. LEC
View current sections...
Extensive reading in a variety of Greek authors. LEC
View current sections...
Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Greek. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
View current sections...
Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Greek or equivalent. RSH
View current sections...
Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. THE
View current sections...
An introduction to the Latin language. LEC
View current sections...
Integrates study of elementary Latin with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Latin grammar concluded with selected readings. Prerequisite: LAT 104 or LAT 105, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Latin grammar concluded with selected readings, integrated with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: LAT 105 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Attention to literary history and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 108 or LAT 109, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Exercises in literary analysis and/or prose composition. Prerequisite: LAT 109 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Vergil's Aeneid, with attention to literary interpretation and literary history. Prerequisite: LAT 112 or LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Vergil's Aeneid with attention to literary history. Exercises in literary interpretation and verse composition. Prerequisite: LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Composition in Latin prose, stressing the basic principles of Latin syntax and style. Recommended for majors and minors. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Cicero, Seneca, Petronius, Pliny, and Apuleius, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and the satirists, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Caesar, Livy, and Tacitus, with attention to issues in Roman history and historiography. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, Sulpicia, Ovid, and Martial, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Plautus, Terence, and Seneca, with attention to literary interpretation, theater history, and performance. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Readings in Latin literature, selected in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Latin literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay advisor. IND
View current sections...
An examination of the grammar, syntax, and style of the Latin language through exercises in composition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, Statius. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Catullus, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Sulpicia, Ovid, Martial. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Cicero, Livy, Seneca, Tacitus, Augustine. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from Plautus, Terence, Horace, Petronius, Seneca, Juvenal, Apuleius. LEC
View current sections...
Extensive reading in a variety of Latin authors. LEC
View current sections...
Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Latin. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
View current sections...
An introduction to teaching required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants. Topics to include: pronunciation, etymology, Latin style, testing methods, and the selecting of texts. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Latin or equivalent. RSH
View current sections...
Graded on a satisfactory/unsatifactory basis. THE
View current sections...

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.