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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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A cultural and psychological analysis of the sources, dynamics, effects, and practices of modern patterns of violence. Variations in psycho/social reactions to violence will be examined with reference to personal, social, and cross-cultural characteristics. Particular attention will be given to the cultural and individual characteristics of people who successfully survive violence and terrorism targeted at them. Emphasis will be upon the psychological and cultural origins of terrorism and violence in modern societies. Prerequisite: Introductory course in anthropology or psychology. LEC
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This seminar will introduce students to feminism in anthropology, including feminist theories, methodologies, ethnographic styles, and the history of women in the discipline since the late 1800s. Emphasis is on the social contexts for feminist theory-building since the 1960s and changing ideas about gender and power. (Same as WGSS 580.) Prerequisite: One of the following: ANTH 389, ANTH 460, WGSS 201; or permission of instructor. LEC
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Course will involve lectures and discussion of ethnobotany - the mutual relationship between plants and traditional people. Research from both the field of anthropology and botany will be incorporated in this course to study the cultural significance of plant materials. The course has 7 main areas of focus: 1) Methods in Ethnobotanical Study; 2) Traditional Botanical Knowledge - knowledge systems, ethnolinguistics; 3) Edible and Medicinal Plants of North America (focus on North American Indians); 4) Traditional Phytochemistry - how traditional people made use of chemical substances; 5) Understanding Traditional Plant Use and Management; 6) Applied Ethnobotany; commercialization and conversation (focus on traditional harvest of plant materials); 7) Ethnobotany in Sustainable Development (focus on medicinal plant exploration by pharmaceutical companies in Latin America). (Same as EVRN 542.) Prerequisite: ANTH 104, ANTH 108, EVRN 148, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Escalating transnational flows of information, commodities, and people have created innumerable kinds of "intimate" contacts on a global scale, such as mail order brides, child adoption, sex tourism, commodified romance, and emotional labor. Exploring the ways that cultural artifacts of intimacy are rendered, fetishized, and reified in a free market economy, this course examines how discourses on love and sex encounter, confront, and negotiate the logics of the capitalist market, the discrepant narratives of (colonial) modernity, and the ethics of pleasure. In so doing, this course navigates the treacherous interplay among emotions-specifically love, sex, and money, seeking the potential and limits of cultural politics of emotions. (Same as WGSS 583.) LEC
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This course takes a hands-on approach to the study of theory, ethics, and methods in visual ethnographic representation. Students also read and consider historical dimensions in this subdiscipline and complete individual and team projects in photographic and videographic media. Prerequisite: An introductory course in cultural anthropology or permission of the instructor. LEC
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An anthropological and historical examination of the processes and dynamics of the colonial experience. Cross-cultural psychosocial phenomena that have profoundly affected the values and social organizations of both colonizers and colonized will be emphasized. Specific examples will be chosen from the former American, Japanese, and European colonial empires with emphasis on Asia. LEC
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This course explores shamanism, broadly defined as the practice of gaining insight through the use of ecstatic techniques (dance, drumming, trance, vision quests, and the use of psychotropic substances) for the purpose of interpreting existence and healing illnesses, through a consideration of theories and evidence for its practice from Upper Paleolithic times to the present day. Examples from the ancient cultures of Asia, Europe, Africa, Australia, and the Americas are used to explore current theoretical approaches in order to identify shamans and shamanism in the past. Issues of identifying shamans and shamanism in art and archaeological contexts are discussed. The course also explores the role that shamanism plays in a wide variety of cultures. The principal goal of the course is to provide a reasoned, critical interpretation of shamanism in the context of contemporary debates about its definition and active practice. Prerequisite: ANTH 108/308 or ANTH 110/310 or ANTH 160/360. LEC
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Students study theories and methods of burial practices in the archaeological record. They learn about past communities; attitudes toward death and burial and how social organization, complexity, ideology, power, gender and age roles contribute to mortuary practices. The course examines a variety of Old and New World examples from different chronological periods through class presentations, debates and written assignments. The course focuses on comparisons and evaluation of traditional and current methods and approaches. Prerequisite: ANTH 100/300 or ANTH 110/310 or instructor's consent. LEC
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A field course taught during the three week summer session. Involves all-day excursions to different regions in order to introduce students to a variety of archaeological landscapes and environments. Focuses on the application of geoscientific concepts and methods in archaeological field investigations, emphasizing natural processes such as erosion, deposition, weathering, and biological and human activity that create and modify the archaeological record, and on soil-stratigraphic and geophysical approaches to landscape and site investigations. LEC
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Techniques in bone identification, sex, race, age determination, stature reconstruction, paleopathology, and bone biology are reviewed. Prerequisite: An introductory course in physical anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LAB
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This is a comprehensive course in the biology of human reproduction (anatomy, physiology, and endocrinology). The implications of human reproductive biology for the evolution of human behavior are considered as well. Students also examine in detail the methods and theories underlying two interconnected approaches utilized by biological anthropologists in the study of human reproduction: human reproductive ecology, which focuses on the biological determinants of human reproductive function and reproductive success, and human behavioral ecology, which focuses on evolutionary relationships between human reproductive strategies and human social behavior. The course is the first part of a two-semester sequence (ANTH 650 and ANTH 660) that examines in detail biological and cultural determinants of human reproductive strategies. Prerequisite: ANTH 359 or BIOL 152 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Examination of possible interrelationships between the demographic structure of a population and the forces of evolution. Students are exposed to field methods and techniques of population studies. Prerequisite: An introductory course in anthropology, biology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This seminar analyzes and critiques the socially constructed nature of reproductive practices and their articulation with relations of power. Topics range from conception to menopause, infertility to population. Cases are drawn from a wide variety of cultural contexts. This course is the second part of a two-semester sequence (beginning with ANTH 650) that examines in detail biological and cultural determinants of human reproduction. (Same as WGSS 660.) Prerequisite: ANTH 650, or 6 hours in women's studies, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey of representative studies of the processes of cultural stability and change, and of theories of innovation, diffusion, acculturation, growth, and planned intervention in cultural processes. LEC
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This course uses critical readings of major anthropological works on Islam to: 1) analyze various interpretations of "Islamic cultures" through a discussion of regionally-grounded works, and 2) examine how the anthropological study of Islam also is informed by theoretical and philosophical approaches to major anthropological questions, such as religion, myth, kinship, social organization, and power. The course offers both a history of various interpretations of Islam as well as a history of theories of these interpretations. (Same as AAAS 663.) LEC
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The course explores the values, practices, cultural systems and social-economic conditions that influence the sickness and health of women in Africa. The focus is on theoretical and applied debates and issues including: contraception, infertility, and reproduction; HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections; spiritual suffering and mental illness; trauma and violence; chronic illness, disability, and aging; pharmaceuticals, biotechnologies, and clinical research. Prerequisite: 6 hours of course work in Anthropology and/or Women's Studies and/or African American Studies. LEC
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This seminar uses a life-cycle approach to examine women's health (physical, mental, and spiritual) and their roles as healers. Special consideration is given to the effects of development programs on well-being, access to health care, and changing roles for women as healers. Cases will be drawn from a variety of Latin American contexts. (Same as WGSS 665 and LAA 665.) Prerequisite: 6 hours of course work in anthropology and/or women's studies and/or Latin American studies. LEC
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An examination of the various approaches (individual, ritual, and cognitive) anthropologists have adopted in the study of religion, with emphasis on millenarian and prophetic movements as examples of radical change. LEC
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Methods of studying the mythology of nonliterate peoples; historical survey of theories of myth; consideration of worldwide myths and primitive mythologies from specific cultures. LEC
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An anthropological investigation, in seminar format, of the social consequences of transformations in today's society. Specific topics may include: the information explosion; developments in science and technology; genetics and assisted reproduction; ethnic and cultural diversity; and changing views of the normal and abnormal, sexual and other forms of relationships, and of the self. Prerequisite: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, sociology, or American studies. LEC
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Examines the ideologies of capitalism and consumerism as they influence social institutions and daily life. Topics for consideration grow out of instructors' interests and may include areas such as class, religion, advertising, politics, gender, medicine, environment, childhood, and education. Prerequisite: ANTH 560 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This seminar examines food and beverage production and consumption in the United States. Organized metaphorically as a meal, the course explores where food and beverages come from, how they are produced and by whom, and what they mean to us as eaters and drinkers. Although the course surveys food and beverage production and consumption in general, special attention is given to meat and poultry, alcohol, coffee, carbonated drinks, regional foods, opposition to consumption of meat and alcohol, and tobacco. LEC
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Transnational processes profoundly shape the 21st century human experience. This course links theories of economic globalization with ethnographic case materials. It explores the spread of the dominant ideology driving these processes and the effects of neoliberal policies on the urgent and vital matters facing humanity today: war and peace, social justice, democracy, cultural pluralism, and ecologically sustainable development. The course thereby links macro-economic policies to the experiences of families, workers, communities, women, indigenous peoples, and other social groups. Prerequisite: ANTH 560 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Analysis of political systems of tribal societies and of pre-industrial states. LEC
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Comparative analysis of the legal and political strategies used to achieve social control in both Western and non-Western cultures. Emphasis on the differential use of customary and legal sanctions, formalized procedures of negotiation or adjudication, and the role of legal specialists in society. LEC
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A seminar exploring the political, religious, cultural and ideological antagonisms that divide contemporary society. Topics of dissension to be treated may include Christianity vs. Islam, evolutionism vs. intelligent design, attitudes pertaining to sexual orientation, and the proper relation between church and state. LEC
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A lecture course concerned with the relationship between culture and biological systems; the prohibition of incest; socialization and aggression in ethnological studies; disease and therapy; and other alterations of mind and body states. LEC
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Ecology of human health; cultural and social factors in the etiology of human diseases; social and cultural variables involved in health practices, programs, the organization of healing systems and the diagnostic process; the consequences of health innovations and medicotechnical apparatus. LEC
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A seminar exploring concepts of the self as the product of variable social and cultural conditions. Consideration of dominant anthropological and interdisciplinary theories of the self and how the self is construed in various societies from Asia, the Pacific, and elsewhere. LEC
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Investigation of the interrelations between sociocultural systems and the natural environment, including a survey of major theories and descriptive studies. (Same as GEOG 670.) LEC
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The course is for students who wish to understand the prehistory of Eastern Europe with special attention to the Slavs. The interdisciplinary course examines East European prehistory from the perspectives of archaeology and linguistics, considering also how ideologies have influenced the interpretation of results. No language prerequisite. (Same as SLAV 635) LEC
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The course reviews the history of archeological, ethnographic, physical anthropological and other types of collections. It also considers current issues facing anthropologists, such as: contested rights to collections and the stories that accompany them; representation and interpretation of cultures; art and artifact; conceptualization, design and building of exhibitions; and anthropological research and education in the museum. LEC
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Development of the field of anthropology and its relations with intellectual history. Emphasis on method and theory in historical context. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC
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An introduction to fundamental theoretical orientations and methodological approaches in world archaeology. Case studies illustrate data acquisition, dating methods, culture history, paleoenvironmental models, and culture processes. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC
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The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary biological anthropology. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC
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The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary cultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. Required of all M.A.-level students in anthropology. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor or graduate standing. LEC
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Studies in technological change through invention, evolution, and diffusion. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC
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This course will cover fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary linguistic anthropology. (Same as LING 706.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. LEC
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This course examines a range of issues critical to responsible research, scholarship, and practice in anthropology. Required for all doctoral students in Anthropology. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology or consent of instructor. SEM
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A survey of the development of method and theory in American archaeology, with emphasis on North America. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Problems in the archaeology of the Great Plains region, with an emphasis on prehistoric developments. LEC
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In-depth examination of specific problems and issues in the study of Precolombian societies of Mesoamerica, Central America, and South America. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: ANTH 506, ANTH 508, and/or consent of instructor. LEC
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Studies of prehistoric cultures and their natural environments. Topic for semester to be announced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in anthropology or consent of instructor. LEC
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The study of language as it concerns anthropology. Language systems in relation to culture, language taxonomy, semantics, and linguistic analysis as an ethnographic tool. (Same as LING 730.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing. LEC
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The tools and techniques necessary to analyze linguistic fieldwork data, including research design, recording and elicitation techniques, computational data processing and analysis, and field ethics. Techniques of research, field recording, and data analysis technology. Methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. Practice of techniques via short studies of at least one language. (Same as LING 740.) Prerequisite: LING 700 or permission of instructor. LEC
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The elicitation and analysis of phonological, grammatical, and discourse data from a language consultant. In-depth research on one language. Techniques of research design, methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. (Same as LING 741.) Prerequisite: LING 705 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to the nature and distribution of North American Indian languages. Prerequisite: ANTH 306 or ANTH 430 or ANTH 730. LEC
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Theories and case studies of languages in contact. Areal and genetic linguistics, genesis of pidgins and creoles, multilingualism. Social, political, economic, and geographic factors in language change. (Same as LING 748.) Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC
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Selected topics in linguistics and linguistic anthropology, focusing on dominant and/or minority languages of China, Central Asia, or a particular region of Central and Eastern Eurasia. Topics may include any subfield of linguistics, including language contact, typology, dialectology, and sociolinguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. (Same as LING 749.) Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC
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The role of disease in human evolution, variation, and adaptation is examined. Topics include paleopathology, epidemics, and genetic/cultural adaptation to certain diseases. Graduate version of ANTH 450 with more advanced requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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The role of behavioral genetics in normal behavior is examined in this seminar. There is special emphasis on the genetics of complex human behavior such as sensory perception, aggression, intelligence, proxemics, kinesics, and learning. Several abnormal conditions, such as schizophrenia, chromosomal aberrations, alcoholism, and brain dysfunction are discussed in terms of the genetic and environmental interactions. LEC
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The evolutionary effects of finite population size and reproductive isolation are discussed in this seminar. Stochastic processes, genetic distances, approaches to population structure, and measures of inbreeding are considered. Prerequisite: ANTH 652 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An intensive study of human teeth. Principles of eruption, growth, genetics, anatomy, pathologies, measurements, casting, and cultural changes in teeth will be presented. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the social and cultural practices that contribute to health and disease, including a survey of therapy systems in both Western and non-Western societies (e.g., Native American, African, Western allopathic medicine, etc.). This course should be of special interest to premedical students and majors in the allied health professions. Graduate version of ANTH 461 with more advanced requirements. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Consideration of comparative physical growth patterns throughout the human life cycle. Sex and population differences in skeletal, dental, and sexual maturation. Effect of genetic and environmental factors upon growth and maturation. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biological anthropology or consent of instructor. LEC
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Intensive, high-level survey and critique of the application of modern biological theory of evolution and taxonomy to the problems of primate and human evolution. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Topic for semester to be announced. Students may repeat the course for different topics. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Survey of field and laboratory investigations of the comparative anatomy and behavior of nonhuman primates. LEC
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A practical course in the use of special laboratory techniques of biological anthropological research and methods of data presentation. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LAB
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Intensive consideration of special problems in cultural anthropology. Topic for semester to be announced. LEC
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Selected problems in applying anthropological theory, methods, and findings in programs of directed change. FLD
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Comparative analysis of the structure, development, and function of human social groups. Emphasis on kinship, legal, economic, and political institutions. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of anthropological approaches to religion, world view, and other symbol systems in simple and complex societies. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Ethnography is both process and product. The product, a representation of a culture (or selected aspects of a culture), is based on fieldwork, the common term for the ethnographic process. This course explores how ethnographers prepare for the field, do their fieldwork, then report it. LEC
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Topic for semester to be announced. Usually the course will focus on selected problems in the social and cultural life of a people in a particular geographic region of the world. Coverage will include both the classical ethnological literature as well as special issues of current concern. Students may repeat the course for different topics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course combines classroom and fieldwork in applications of theories, ethics, and methods of visual representation. Students carry out team-based ethnographic fieldwork projects through which they learn about pre-production, video production, and nonlinear post-production of ethnographic video documentaries. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ANTH 564 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Anthropological approaches to the study of worldview, religion, folklore, mythology, art, and other expressive behavior. Topic for the semester to be announced. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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This seminar is intended primarily for graduate students in anthropology or other disciplines that share an interest in any of the subdisciplines of anthropology (archaeology, linguistic anthropology, biological anthropology, and sociocultural anthropology) and/or anthropological theories and methods. Undergraduates pursuing Honors or other major research projects are also encouraged to participate. Students will receive training in the contemporary theories, research, and pedagogies informing the anthropology of gender. Class participants will explore how these materials intersect with their current thesis or research projects and develop syllabi specific to their subdiscipline. (Same as WGSS 789.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The historical and cross-cultural study of artifacts as embodiments of technological, social, organizational, and ideological aspects of culture. LEC
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Provides directed, practical experience in research, collection care and management, public education, and exhibits, with emphasis to suit the particular requirements of each student. Limit of six hours of credit for the M.A. degree. (Same as AMS 799, BIOL 799, GEOL 723, HIST 799, and MUSE 799.) FLD
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An advanced study of the relations between language and culture. Subject will vary each semester; students may repeat the course more than once. (Same as LING 810.) LEC
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Instruction in statistical methods for analyzing quantitative data in archaeological research. Topics will include techniques for handling nominal, ordinal, and radio-scale variables, the collection and presentation of quantitative information, and the use of computers. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and college-level algebra and/or consent of instructor. LEC
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Subject matter of seminar to be announced for semester. LEC
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A two-semester course designed to provide graduate students with basic principles in the analysis of archaeological data. Course content will include an introduction to archaeological systematics, analytical procedures, application of multivariate statistics, and computer applications. Topic for semester to be announced. FLD
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Consideration of scientific methodology, basic assumptions of anthropological archaeology, relationship of archaeology and anthropology, and current theoretical and methodological trends in archaeology. LEC
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This course provides advanced training in selected aspects of medical anthropology; the topic for a particular semester will reflect the current interests of the instructor. It is expected that the course content will alternate between theoretical and applied emphases. May be repeated for a total of six hours credit. Prerequisite: ANTH 461 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Intensive consideration of special problems in feminist anthropology. Topic for the semester to be announced. May be repeated for a total of six hours credit. (Same as WGSS 880.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Under the direction of a professional archaeologist, undergraduate and graduate students are taught proper procedures for the excavation and laboratory analysis of data from a prehistoric or historic archaeological site. Data gathered may be used for additional graduate research. Enrollment by application; limited to twenty students. A fee for subsistence costs will be charged. FLD
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Graduate students are taught techniques of archaeological fieldwork, including survey and excavation, as well as laboratory procedures, including artifact classification and curation. FLD
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Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. Limit of six hours credit for the M.A. degree. RSH
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Experiential learning in the application of anthropology through placement in business, government, community, research, or social service organization or agency. Students design and implement an anthropological project under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology. RSC
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Experiential learning in the application of anthropology through placement in business, government, community, research, or social service organization or agency. This course is a sequel to ANTH 897. Students finish up any remaining research and deliver their findings to the client. They also prepare a written report and a verbal presentation for the Department of Anthropology. Prerequisite: ANTH 897 and Graduate standing in Anthropology. RSC
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Limit of six hours credit for the M.A. degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Individual investigation of special problems in anthropology. RSH
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Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
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Five hours of class per week. Basic level of oral fluency and aural comprehension. Vocabulary acquisition, pronunciation, grammar, and writing. Reading of simple texts. Not open to native speakers of Arabic. LEC
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Five hours of class per week. A continuation of ARAB 110. Readings in cultural texts. Prerequisite: ARAB 110. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Arabic. Intermediate oral proficiency and aural comprehension. Systematic review of grammar. Writing skills beyond the basic level. Introduction to modern Arabic texts and discussion in Arabic. Prerequisite: ARAB 120. LEC
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Three hours of class conducted in Arabic. Continuation of ARAB 210. Discussion in Arabic of texts studied. Prerequisite: ARAB 210. LEC
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A practical Arabic language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Arabic. Designed for students who have had two or more years of Arabic study. Open to native speakers. Prerequisite: ARAB 220 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A continuation of ARAB 310. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of ARAB 310 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Designed for native and near-native speakers, this course involves reading newspapers and other publications in the language intended for native speakers, conversation, oral presentations, and advanced grammar. Prerequisite: Native or near-native speaker proficiency or consent of instructor. LEC
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Continuation of ARAB 401. LEC
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A survey course that describes the interplay between the science of astronomy and cultural beliefs. It uses, among others, examples of how religious and philosophical tenets have enhanced or conflicted with scientific principles. Not for astronomy majors. LEC
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The structure and evolution of the universe, from nearby planets to distant quasars, are examined. Topics include recent discoveries concerning planets, stars, galaxies, pulsars and black holes as well as their evolution, the structure of the universe today and how it will be in the future. The emphasis is descriptive rather than mathematical. Concurrent enrollment in ASTR 196 suggested, but not required. Prerequisite: One year each of high school algebra and geometry. LEC
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An introduction to astronomical observations and methods. Students have the opportunity to use the telescopes at the K.U. observatory. The course includes constellation recognition, finding celestial objects, and interpreting astronomical data. A companion course to ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. Counts as a laboratory science when preceded or accompanied by ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. Prerequisite or corequisite: ASTR 191 or ASTR 391. LAB
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An exploration of astronomical extremes from various points of view: extremes in ages (the Big Bang and recent star formation), velocities and distances (quasars), rotation (pulsars), density (white dwarfs, neutron stars, black holes), energy release (stellar explosions), and proximity (interacting binary stars). Prerequisite: Survey course in astronomy. LEC
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Undergraduate observational or theoretical problems in astronomy. Maximum credit, six hours. Prerequisite: Permission of department. IND
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An honors, calculus-based introduction to astronomy and astrophysics, required for astronomy majors. Components of the Universe - from planetary systems, stellar systems, large scale structure and cosmology - are examined to illuminate the physics principles which govern their evolution. Not open to students with prior credit in ASTR 191 or ASTR 291. Prerequisite: MATH 121, and either permission of instructor, or participation in the University Honors Program. LEC
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An introduction to the search for planets around other stars and for life in the universe beyond the earth. A discussion of the astronomical conditions under which life might form and the biological conditions of life formation and evolution. Methods of searching for extraterrestrial life. Prerequisite: An introductory course in biology, astronomy or geology. LEC
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