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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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An introduction to sociological concepts, methods, and substantive findings more intensive than that provided in SOC 104. Students may take this course in lieu of SOC 104 to satisfy requirements for the major and the minor. This course may not be taken for credit by those who have taken SOC 104. LEC
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Discusses the way our identities, values, and behavior have been and continue to be shaped by social and situational factors. Attention is paid to the influence of factors like language, culture, social roles, specific social institutions, and broad structures of inequality and power on how we see ourselves and others. This course provides a more intensive coverage of the subject matter than that provided in SOC 150. May not be taken by anyone who has already taken SOC 150 or its equivalent. LEC
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This course is designed to explore competing explanations for the causes of, and cures for, the enduring problems of American society. The course critically analyzes dominant definitions of social problems, the political and economic roots of theses problems, and the public policies aimed at reducing them. This course provides a more intensive coverage of the subject matter than that provided in SOC 160. May not be taken by anyone who has already completed SOC 160 or its equivalent. LEC
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Analysis of the family as a social institution primarily in the U.S. context. Topics considered are: current and historical changes in how the family is constituted, contrasting sociological theories of family relationships, sexuality in relation to family life, the coexistence of love and hate in families, family dissolution and reformation, and the care of children. A key theme is diversity: social class, gender, race/ethnicity, and age. This course provides a more intensive coverage of the subject matter than that provided in SOC 220. May not be taken by anyone who has already taken SOC 220 or its equivalent. LEC
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An introduction to the nature and methods of social research. Topics may include: hypothesis formulation and testing; how to design a research project, collect and analyze data; elementary statistical procedures; and ethical issues. Prerequisite: Six hours of Sociology credit, including Sociology 104. A minimum GPA of 2.3 in all SOC courses is strongly recommended for students planning to enroll in this course. LEC
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An examination of the causes and consequences of population change in the United States and around the world with special focus on the impact of changes in populations on social institutions. We use social demographic perspectives to explore patterns of birth, illness, death, population concentration, population migration and immigration, and changes in these over time. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 104, SOC 110, SOC 150, SOC 160, or SOC 220. LEC
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An analysis of complex organizations in modern societies. Attention is given to the rise of bureaucracy in business and government; the way organizations influence and respond to their social cultural environments; and the various roles that individuals play in organizations. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Comparative examination of the health status of men and women in relation to key elements of contemporary societies, including not only medicine and health care services, but also systems of social inequality and stratification, cultural constructions of gender, and social policies. Emphasis will be placed on the U.S.; however, the course also will provide international comparisons and an overall global context. LEC
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The social structure and organization of American society with special reference to long-term and recent social changes. (Same as AMS 330.) Not open to students with credit for SOC 132. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Examines the influence abroad of US culture, policies and practices and the impact of other countries on US culture, society, and politics. Among the topics that may be examined are race, ethnicity, colonialism, imperialism, migration, technology, communications and media, popular culture, language, health, domestic and transnational organizations, as well as economic, political, religious, military and educational institutions. (Same as AMS 332). LEC
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Structures, functions, and processes of change in local communities; interrelations of towns and small cities with rural areas and metropolitan centers with their hinterlands. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology or ANTH 108 or ANTH 308. LEC
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Examination of the process of urbanization in modern societies, including the size, growth, functions, and ecology of cities and systems of cities; such urban social institutions as the economy, politics, and the family; and major contemporary urban policies and problems. Each topic will be analyzed from several sociological perspectives. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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International migration reshapes politics, economics, social relations, and racial/ethnic identities. Using the United States and other countries as case studies, we explore the variations among immigrant groups and their experiences in social institutions such as the family, religion, education, labor market, and government. We consider the influence of national origin, gender, class, and culture on immigration and reception experiences, as well as issues of assimilation, transnationalism and identity. Prerequisite: SOC 104. LEC
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An examination of Africa's social dynamics. Topics considered include: the origins of modern African societies, nations, and states; family structures and values; ethnicity, gender relations and patriarchy; social, political, economic and cultural institutions; African exceptionalism; contemporary African social dynamics; transnational migration; HIV/AIDS; political transitions; and Africa's place in the emerging global order. Prerequisite: SOC 104. LEC
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An examination of sex roles, sex stereotypes, and major issues involved in sex-role research. Emphasizes explanations of inequality between American males and females in the family and at work. The course is designed around lectures, panels, workshops, and films. LEC
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This course examines changing methods of social control in society. Social control can be formal (e.g., law and criminal justice system) or informal (e.g., families, peer groups). This course examines the ways that we, as a society, attempt to respond to matters such as deviance, illness, crime, and poverty. This course will survey the many varieties of formal and informal social control faced by individuals in society, and the ways in which individuals resist and conform to various disciplinary and control regimes. Prerequisite: a principal course in Sociology. LEC
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An overview of sociological theory and research on culture created and distributed through the mass media and its role in shaping our common sense interpretations of our daily lives. Topics include the social organization of the media, the relation between popular culture and the media, themes communicated in various elements of popular culture, and how various groups interpret cultural messages and incorporate them in their lives. LEC
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Similar in content to SOC 364. An overview of sociological theory and research on culture created and distributed through the mass media and its role in shaping our common sense interpretations of our daily lives. Topics include the social organization of the media, the relation between popular culture and the media, themes communicated in various elements of popular culture, and how various groups interpret cultural messages and incorporate them in their lives. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is an introduction to the field of conflict resolution. Collaborative approaches to dealing with conflict will be examined from the micro, interpersonal group level to the macro, organizational level. The causes and consequences of conflict will be presented as well as problem solving techniques for the resolution of conflict in social groups. LEC
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The sociological study of groups that differ from the mainstream practices of their societies and of conditions affecting their careers. The primary objectives are to introduce and analytically apply sociological conceptualizations of groups, group careers, group mainstream interactions, and participant orientations. The principal cases examined are the Hutterites, the Shakers, and the Oneida Community, supplemented by briefer analyses of a variety of other groups. Questions concerning the formation, organization, processes, participants, and transformations of groups are emphasized. LEC
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This course invites students to study society and its impact on the environment. Environmental problems are social problems. This course will address such items as social paradigms, theories, inequalities, movements, and research. (Same as EVRN 385.) LEC
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This course covers theoretical, practical, cross-cultural and historical aspects of death and dying. Social, psychological, biomedical, economic and legal issues surrounding death and dying are explored. Students examine their own ideas, feelings, and attitudes towards death and dying, and reflect on the origins and significance of those beliefs. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing. LEC
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Examines the military as a social institution. Students analyze both the internal organization and practices of the armed forces and the relationships between the military and other social institutions. It considers the historical forces that have shaped the present. Thus, past events and policies as well as current ones are covered in the course. The primary focus of this course is on the American military and its relationship to American society, but considers the armed forces of other societies. Prerequisite: SOC 104 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An overview of sociological theory and research on the social practices constructing men and women as "opposites" and creating systematic inequality between them in class-, race-, and nation-specific ways. We consider arguments and evidence that gender is something we are, something we do, a part of every social institution, and a major aspect of how we are organized as a society. LEC
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Sociological investigation of women's changing relationship to paid and unpaid labor in the economy and the family. Several theories are compared in these contexts: Characteristics of employed women, including occupational distribution and pay; women's experiences in "traditional" and "nontraditional" occupations, including professions and management; socialization and education for employment; integration of marriage, housework, and child care; anti-discriminatory laws and policies. Prerequisite: A principal course in Sociology. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to encourage students to think sociologically about social issues by working as volunteer interns for non-profit community or campus organizations. Enrollment must be approved by the departmental Undergraduate Studies Committee. See the department's Director of Undergraduate Studies for guidelines. Prerequisite: 21 credits in sociology with a 3.0 GPA and permission of the instructor. FLD
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in Sociology at the junior/senior level. Course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. No more than 6 hours of SOC 295 or SOC 495 may count towards the Sociology major or minor. LEC
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Intensive study and research under faculty direction including the writing of a thesis. Enrollment may be split between two semesters, but no grade will be given until completion of the thesis. Admission to honors candidacy is open only to majors who have shown a marked capability for independent study and have completed either SOC 310 or SOC 500. IND
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An introduction to the principal texts in sociological theory and the ideas that made them important. Primary materials are emphasized, ranging from medieval to the current age. The goal of the course is to show continuity and change in the theoretical tradition of sociology, and to demonstrate the continued importance of classical ideas. Prerequisite: SOC 510 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to social scientific data analysis, with an emphasis on descriptive and inferential statistics. Specific topics include sampling, measures of association and correlation, significance testing, the logic of causal inference, the use of computer programs for data analysis, multivariate analysis, and the critical evaluation of social science research findings. Prerequisite: SOC 310 and MATH 101, or instructor permission. LEC
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A comparative study of groups, associations, and institutions as types of social systems with special attention to structural characteristics and organizational processes; the nature of membership and leadership, including recruitment, selection and training; the social position, relationship, and function of these groups in communities and societies. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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This class focuses on economic inequality and the political and social forces that create and sustain it in the United States and internationally. The variables of race, ethnicity, status, and gender are analyzed as they relate to the differences in the distribution of wealth and power, and attention is paid to how these multiple variables shape opportunities. LEC
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Analysis of the basic sociological concepts that apply to majority/minority relations; with special emphasis on racial and ethnic interaction in the United States. (Same as AMS 522.) Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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An advanced survey of theory and research in social gerontology, giving primary attention to aging and the aged as affected by social organization, including such social institutions as familial, economic, political, and health care; organizational processes such as social stratification; and living environments including community and housing. In these contexts, certain demographic, cross-cultural, social-psychological, and physiological aspects of aging will also be considered. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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An analysis of the social organization of production with attention being given to such topics as: world economic crises and their social bases, capitalist and socialist economies, primitive and advanced economic systems, multinational corporations, the nature of housework, and the transformation of economic systems. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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A consideration of problems in the conceptual and empirical definition of occupations and professions. It will involve the examination of the process of professionalization, the differentiation and integration of labor, career patterns, the work situation, the study of leisure, and the social consequences of changes in occupations and professions. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Addresses sociological aspects of the growth of transnational economic, cultural, institutional, and political interconnections, the freer and faster movement of goods, images, ideas, people, and institutional forms across national borders, and the consequences and problems of these processes. The focus is on recent (later 20th century to the present) global restructuring in the context of historical shifts in capitalist development. Prerequisite: SOC 104. LEC
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Focuses on the social forces that generated industrial capitalism. Emphasis will be on comparative social structures and their meaning for the nature and quality of life. The transformation from medieval to mercantilist to industrial capitalism will be analyzed in detail. Possibilities of post-industrial society will be discussed. This course will consider exclusively Western development. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Comparative study of social, economic, political, and ideological factors influencing global social change, and analysis of different theoretical orientations related to social change in various societies. Prerequisite: A principal course in Sociology. LEC
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The sociological analysis of social, historical, and contemporary issues pertaining to the Middle East and to relations between the Middle East and other regions of the world. We use sociological theoretical perspectives to address such topics as nationalism and identity; religion, race and ethnicity; gender, socioeconomic development, and sociopolitical and economic relations with the United States. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 104, SOC 110, SOC 150, SOC 160, or SOC 220. LEC
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Comparative study of problems associated with industrialization in developing nations, including population problems, unemployment, social and welfare problems, and various political issues. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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An examination of constructions of race and ethnicity around the world. Emphasis is on the social, political, historical, cultural and economic factors that lead to the creation of ethnic and racial identities, ethnic conflict and accommodation, ethnic movements, and ethnic political organization. Racial and ethnic relations in the U.S. are compared with other countries. Major focus is placed on ethnicity in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean and/or the Middle East. (Same as AAAS 510 and AMS 534.) LEC
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This course examines gender roles and identity in the global context and focuses specifically on historical comparative analysis of women's participation in--and impact on--social, political, economic, and cultural aspects of their communities and nations. Major emphasis will be placed on women in Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East. Prerequisite: A principal course in Sociology. LEC
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An examination of the history, sociology, and culture of U.S. ethnic categories (e.g., American Indians, Latinos, Asian Americans, Jewish Americans, Irish Americans). The specific group studied varies from semester to semester. Course may be repeated for credit. (Same as AMS 536.) Prerequisite: A principal course in American Studies, Sociology, or Anthropology, or permission of instructor. LEC
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An analysis of the sources and procedures of development of the criminal law and analysis of the practices of law enforcement, prosecution, and judicial action, principally in the United States. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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General analysis of the ways in which individuals and actions come to be defined as deviant in a society, including the political, economic, social, and cultural processes of labeling, rulemaking, and rule breaking: Why are some acts and groups considered deviant at some points in time and in some places, but not in others? Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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A survey of the effects of social structure, societal values, and social change upon the creation and alteration of law. Various perspectives from the social sciences will be employed in the introductory examination of the general place of law in societies. The emphasis of the course will be on the sociological analysis of law in Western history as well as the present. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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The nature of social conflict, with special emphasis on the more persistent conflict areas of modern social life such as industrial, racial, religious, and national conflicts. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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An analysis of such collective phenomena as crowd behavior, social epidemics, fads, fashions, popular crazes, and mass movements; the nature of the public; functional analysis of public opinion; the problems of democracy as viewed from the standpoint of organizing collective action. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Processes of negotiation and mediation in settling disputes in communities and organizations over controversial issues, policies, and decisions. Knowledge of skills are developed through studying theories and research findings, and by case analysis, role playing, and simulation. LEC
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This course will examine violence in social and political life. The causes and consequences of various types of violence will be examined in a variety of social settings. Examples include violence in the family, schools, the workplace, violence in cities, and violence as a part of the political process: assassination, revolution, coups, terrorism, and government repression. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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A one- or two-semester course in which students are provided the opportunity, as interns, to gain practical experience working in the criminal justice system agency. A report in the format of a research paper is required at the conclusion of the practicum. Open only to Crime and Delinquency Studies majors. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. FLD
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Analysis of various sociological perspectives and/or the application of various perspectives to a given social phenomenon. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Feminist theories accord a central role to gender and the oppression of women in developing an analysis of social life. This course will explore and evaluate accounts of social structure, social processes, and consciousness developed from a feminist perspective. A broad range of theoretical models will be presented, drawing on liberal, historical materialist, psychoanalytical, cultural, and Black feminist theories. Prerequisite: A principal course in Sociology and at least junior standing. LEC
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Methods and techniques of collecting and analyzing social data obtained by interviewing a sample of the population. Practice through fieldwork and laboratory analysis. LEC
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Examines concepts of demographic measurement and analysis for the study of changes in size, composition and distribution of populations. Students learn to measure and analyze basic population components such as fertility, mortality, migration and health using rates, standardization, decomposition of differences and life tables. Provides an opportunity to develop quantitative skills in the context of human life course processes that might be extended to include the study of employment, incarceration, education and other phenomena. Involves some reliance on calculus, substantial use of statistical software and an extended research project. Course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: SOC 510 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. LEC
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Critical analysis of the current health status and health needs of women, exploring how lay, medical, and research assumptions have influenced both the clinical/scientific literature and the organization of health services. The course includes a focus on historical patterns in women's health issues and social change actions. (Same as HP&M 620.) LEC
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The study of politics and society in the United States and abroad, including power and authority-who has them, how are they acquired, when are they challenged; state formation, the expansion of central governments, and patterns of political domination; political and nationalist movements; the politics of gender, class, race, and ethnicity; political culture and ideology; ethnic and nationalist conflict; revolution and political change. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology or consent of instructor. LEC
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Comparative analysis of social organization in simple and complex societies. Consideration of the process of differentiation, specialization, institutionalization, and change, with special attention given to the emergence of intergroup and interorganizational forms of social organization typical of complex societies. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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A systematic introduction to cross-cultural issues from the standpoint of sociology, designed to acquaint students with the full range of substantive and methodological issues that arise in comparative sociological inquiry, with a primary focus on non-western societies. Specific topics to be addressed may include war and peace, stratification and inequality, race and ethnicity, and political authority and power, all viewed in the light of cross-cultural research and theory. Prerequisite: A previous Sociology course or consent of instructor. LEC
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The social roles of science in relation to other institutions, to technology, and to social change; and, within the scientific community, enculturation, information-flow, creativity, decision-making, administration, and leadership. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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An introduction to medical sociology. Examination of social influences on illness and disease, the seeking of medical help, playing the sick role, and epidemiology; sociological theory and research on medical and health care occupations, hospitals, medical technologies; and drug treatment, rural health, patient advocacy, and other contemporary issues. LEC
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A sociological examination of medical and health care occupations and professions. The selection of careers, socialization processes, and the development of professional identities. Interactions among practitioners, health care teams, consumers, and professional and community power structures. Control and coordination of work. The impact of increasing specialization and changes in the demographic makeup of client and professional populations. Coping with medical failure and other problems inherent in medical and health care work. LEC
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A comparative study of the nature of religion in human societies both primitive and civilized; the functioning of religion for the community and the individual; the analysis of belief, myths, rituals, sacred attitudes, cults, religious movements, and church organization. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology or ANTH 108 or ANTH 308. LEC
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Principal focus on elementary, secondary, and collegiate school systems with some attention given to educational subsystems within other institutions. Among the topics to be considered are the following: the school as a social system, socialization and socializing organizations, education and social stratification, and schools in the urban environment. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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This course examines families in the context of social inequalities based on race-ethnicity, social class, gender, and sexuality. It analyzes the link between family diversity and social inequalities in the U.S. and elsewhere and theorizes families using a critical lens that focuses on social policies and power relations that perpetuate social inequalities. We also explore the growing complexities of families and how they affect and are affected by other social institutions, especially the labor market. Prerequisite: SOC 220 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Examination of organized sport as a social institution and its relation to other social institutions (e.g., political, economic, educational, and religious), with special emphasis on American society. Analysis of the social correlates of sports participation and a consideration of the role of sport in social change. (Same as AMS 629.) Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Aspects of the social organization of main Latin American nations, including, e.g., race/ethnicity, social class, gender, urbanization, socioeconomic development, revolution, and relations with the U.S. Emphasis on sociological theories of Latin American development. Prerequisite: A principal course in Sociology or ANTH 108 or ANTH 308, plus junior-senior or graduate standing. LEC
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An introduction to a branch of sociology, mainly European in origin, that considers the relation between social structure and "high" and "mass" culture. Specific theories of these relations will be applied to works of literature, the fine arts, or music. Some preliminary acquaintance with these subjects is desirable but not mandatory for admission to the course. LEC
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This course gives students a basic understanding of Islam and Islamic movements, explores the economic, social, political, and cultural context in which these movements take place, and examines the impact of Islam on politics in select countries. Issues such as compatibility of political Islam and democratic politics, political economy in Muslim societies, fundamentalism in Islam, gender relations, identity politics and questions on clash of civilizations are explored. (Same as POLS 667). Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology, POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A historically-conscious, sociological exploration of political, cultural and health issues involved in transnational migration, this course invites the student to situate current transnational migration within specific historical social processes within both postcolonial Africa and the postcolonial West. The course examines parallels from the experience of migration in other parts of the world, specifically Asia and Latin America. The aim is an understanding and appreciation of both the interconnectedness of the world's peoples and, crucially, of the world's histories. Prerequisite: SOC 104. LEC
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The sociology of mental illness concerns itself with the study of mental disorders as social phenomena. The course will be concerned with (1) the social factors and social processes that contribute to mental disorders, (2) the social definitions of mental disorders as forms of social deviance, (3) the social facets in the treatment and care of disordered persons, and (4) the social aspects of the prevention of mental disorders. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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The individual and social processes that produce violation of legal norms, dealing with society's responses to these violations only insofar as the responses influence the violators. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Legal systems for handling offenders and the development of the laws creating these systems. Emphasis on the various parts (police, courts, probation, penal institutions, and parole) of the system will vary. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Social movements as collective action to establish forms of social organization; consideration of reform, revolutionary, sectarian and fashion movements; ideology, esprit de corps, morale and leadership as factors in development and organization. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Descriptive and analytic account of cold and hot wars. The concept of enemy. Types of war. Emphasis on personal and collective action in warlike situations. War and international politics. The ideologies of war from the classics to the present. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology. LEC
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Library or field research either as part of an ongoing project or as an independent study project. One to twelve hours. May be taken from one or more faculty during one or more semesters, the total hours not to exceed 12. No more than 3 credits may be applied to satisfy requirements for the sociology major. Prerequisite: Two courses in sociology and consent of instructor. IND
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Each seminar will explore problems at the intersection of sociology and history. Topic, instructors, and hours of credit will be announced in the Schedule of Classes. Seminars will be offered by different instructors on different topics and students may take more than one topic. No prerequisite. LEC
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This course will offer a range of sociological perspectives on the role of gender in society. The particular substantive focus will vary each semester to allow flexibility for in-depth analysis of gender relationships in such areas as politics, health and aging, and work. LEC
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A comprehensive review of the major theoretical and empirical approaches used in the study of institutionalized social inequality. Reference to the origins, forms, cultural and structural variations and their changes over time, consequences and ideologies of social inequality. Prerequisite: A distribution course in sociology. LEC
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Advanced study of theory and practice relating to deviation. May be repeated as topics vary. Prerequisite: SOC 662 or SOC 661. LEC
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A proseminar coordinated by the Gerontology Center. The proseminar explores essential areas of gerontology for researchers and practitioners, providing a multidisciplinary (psychology, biology, sociology, and communication) perspective on aging. The proseminar surveys contemporary basic and applied research, service programs, and policy and management issues in gerontology. (Same as ABSC 787, AMS 767, COMS 787, and PSYC 787.) (Formerly HDFL 787.) LEC
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Analysis of approaches to the study of sociocultural change in America, with special emphasis on a systems perspective. Seniors by consent of instructor. LEC
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Analysis of the dynamics of intergroup relations (e.g., class, religious, ethnic, racial, political) in America with special emphasis on the examination of major theoretical and empirical approaches employed in the study of societal conflict and consensus. LEC
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Topics will vary from semester to semester and instructor to instructor to allow flexibility for in-depth analysis of particular topics. LEC
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Introduction to major disciplinary issues, departmental research specialties, faculty research interests, interdisciplinary connections, funding sources, and professional writing. Required of M.A. students entering the graduate program in sociology. May not be taken by those who have credit for SOC 990. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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This is less a survey of intellectual history than an effort to trace the "preclassical" roots of sociological theory. We explore the rise of paradigmatic concerns in the writings of such key figures as Aristotle, Marsilius of Padua, Martin Luther, Etienne de la Boetie, Michel de Montaigne, Charles de Montesquieu, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, G.W.F. Hegel, Flora Tristan, and Ludwig Feuerbach, among others. LEC
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This seminar will focus on the later 19th and early 20th century "theories of society," addressing the origins and developmental tendencies of Western modernity and their relation to premodern social orders. Primary texts of the major theorists (eg. Marx, Durkheim, Nietzsche, Weber, Simmel, and Mead) will be studied in historical context. The tradition's analytical and critical resources and problematic features will also be explored. Finally, the connections between this tradition and contemporary sociological approaches will be explored. LEC
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A critical examination of recent trends and debates in sociological theory. This is a thematically oriented course in which classical as well as contemporary views will be explored. Attention will be directed to theoretical issues under discussion in fields such as symbolic interactionism, semiology, ethnomethodology, critical theory, macrosociology, and others. LEC
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This course reviews the major sociological approaches to the study of the relationship between thought and the social context within which it arises. A central concern is an examination of the relationship between ideology and social structures, particularly as expressed in the construction of official knowledge. LEC
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This course will explore and evaluate accounts of social structure, social processes, and consciousness developed in the feminist literature. We will review a range of theoretical arguments, including liberal, historical, materialist, psychoanalytic, cultural, and Black feminist theories. Some of the readings will focus on limitations and distortions within mainstream social theory; others will center on the development of alternative social theory using the standpoint of women as a point of departure. LEC
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The goals of this course are to understand the characteristics of sociologically interesting and rigorous research and to design a research proposal that shares those characteristics. The focus of students' proposals will be their M.A. thesis project. Students will read books and articles representing a variety of research approaches (ethnographies, surveys, interviews, document analyses, historical studies, comparative research, etc.), and will deconstruct them in order to understand their theoretical and methodological significance. Assignments will include a completed M.A. thesis proposal. LEC
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The use of the scientific method to study social phenomena including: the formulation and testing of hypotheses; techniques for collecting data; measuring social variables; interpreting research findings; the relationship of theory and facts. Prerequisite: A distribution course in sociology. LEC
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Consideration of quantitative methods of analysis including both parametric and non-parametric techniques. Prerequisite: A course in statistics. LEC
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Will acquaint the student both theoretically and empirically with the procedures and logics of the research techniques employed by individuals or small research teams conducting qualitative fieldwork. Prerequisite: A distribution course in sociology. FLD
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Students learn the logic, assumptions, designs, and procedures involved in conducting the major types of research found in the health services field. Students develop an informed basis for critically evaluating the methodological adequacy of research studies in the areas of descriptive and analytic epidemiology, program evaluation, and health-related survey research as well as working knowledge of the research process itself. Emphasis is placed on examining basic health services issues such as measuring quality of care, understanding the role of social factors in the etiology of disease, determining the health status and health needs of populations, and incorporating health services research into organizational policy and decision-making. LEC
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This course offers an overview of the different perspectives and key arguments comprising the field of political sociology, including both classical and contemporary readings. The issues studied in this field include the nature of power and the nature of the state, relations between state and society, and social movements, political organization and civic participation, political culture, voting behavior, comparative political systems, warfare, democracy and economic development, citizenship, nationalism, revolutions, and globalization. LEC
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This course provides students with an analytic understanding of the organization, professional, and interpersonal behavior that characterizes contemporary health and health care. Emphasis is placed on examination and integration of conceptual frameworks theories, and research findings bearing on basic behavioral/managerial issues such as authority relations in health care settings, models of illness behavior and health services utilization, the impact of organizational structure on employee and client attitudes and behavior, and the culture of professional medicine in relation to patient care. LEC
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Aspects of the social organization of main Latin American nations, including, e.g., race/ethnicity, social class, gender, urbanization, socioeconomic development, revolution, and relations with the U.S. Emphasis on sociological theories of Latin American development. Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology or ANTH 108 or ANTH 308, plus junior-senior or graduate student standing. LEC
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Provides a broad survey of major developments in the field. Topics include the intellectual origins of international political economy; the historical evolution of the international system; North-South and Western trade, investment, and monetary relations; foreign aid, debt technology transfer, development, international economic institutions (e.g., International Monetary Funds, World Bank, Multinational Corporations, etc.). (Same as POLS 973.) LEC
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