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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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Study of religious thought, practice, and institutions of Christianity with an emphasis on the examination of primary documents. LEC
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Study of religious thought, practice, and institutions of Islam with an emphasis on the examination of primary documents. (Same as AAAS 532.) LEC
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A study of ritual theory and a comparative study of ritual activity among selected religious traditions. May be taken more than once if content differs sufficiently. LEC
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A study of the history and institutions of Islam in Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of Islam on African traditional religions and African civilization in general; the historiographical traditions of Islam in Africa. (Same as AAAS 542.) LEC
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Focusing on issues of gender, this course follows major religious developments in the Islamic tradition. Also examines how Muslim women have impacted those developments. LEC
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An examination of major developments in classical Islamic literature in the Middle East and beyond, with attention to the poetic and prose works (in translation) that emerged from them. (Same as AAAS 552.) LEC
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A reading and media-rich survey of institutional, ritual, literary, educational, and exegetical practices that have shaped the lives of Buddhists in China, past and present. Alterities within the Buddhist tradition, and interactions with other religious options, are considered. (Same as EALC 555.) LEC
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This course examines movements of renewal and reform in the Islamic world today. Also studies the conditions that gave rise to calls for reform throughout the Muslim majority world, as well as the impact reform movements have had on the practices and beliefs of Muslims today. LEC
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This course deals analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the themes of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from a perspective of history of ideas. (Same as HIST 558.) LEC
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This course deals analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the Reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and focuses on the themes of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. It is essentially an examination of religious history from a perspective of the history of ideas. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. (Same as HIST 559.) LEC
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An introduction to individual Jewish thinkers and collective projects from Philo to the present, including The Talmud and Midrash, Middle Age and Early Modern Jewish philosophical and Talmudic rationalism and mysticism. Considers such thinkers as Spinoza, Cohen, Soloveitchik, Rosenzweig, and Levinas. LEC
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A study of the major intellectual sources of the Jewish tradition from the Mishna, Talmud, Midrash, prayerbook, philosophers, the Zohar, and the Shulchan Aruch. Prerequisite: A course in Religious Studies numbered 300 or above. LEC
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A survey of religions active in Kansas in the past or present. The course has a strong fieldwork component in which students, after receiving training in fieldwork methods, conduct interviews and gather information to contribute to a public archive of religion in Kansas. FLD
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An examination of the perspectives of selected religious traditions on the meaning of illness and health, methods of diagnosis and treatment, and the place of these themes and experiences within each tradition. LEC
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Consideration of the psychological antecedents of religious experience, the nature of religious experience, and the behavioral consequences of religion. Focus will be on psychological theory and research relevant to religious thought, feeling, belief, and behavior. (Same as PSYC 581.) Prerequisite: PSYC 104. LEC
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A survey of the beliefs, practices, and social impact of religious minorities in the United States, both contemporary and historical, rooted primarily in Christianity and Judaism. LEC
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A survey of the beliefs, practices, and social impact of religious minorities in the United States, both contemporary and historical, which have developed primarily from sources other than Christianity and Judaism. LEC
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An introduction to the various methods by which social scientists, historians, philosophers, and theologians study the meaning, influence, and significance of religion as an integral part of society and its cultural heritage. Prerequisite: REL 104 required for undergraduate students. No prerequisite for graduate students. LEC
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An examination of the relationship between religious faith and politics in Western political thought and theory. The approach will be both historical and philosophical, beginning with Moses on the one hand, and the Greeks on the other. Texts will include biblical, Greek philosophical, Jewish and Christian philosophical and theological writings. (Same as POLS 604.) Prerequisite: POLS 201, or for non-POLS majors completion of Western Civilization requirements, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of developments in Sufi (Islamic Mystical) thought, poetry, and ritual throughout Muslim history and across the Muslim world. (Same as AAAS 650.) Prerequisite: AAAS 349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An investigation of the relationship between Islam, and gender roles and status in religious texts (Quran and Hadith) and in societies across the Muslim world, past and present. (Same as AAAS 657.) Prerequisite: AAAS349/REL 350 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Main themes and traditions in ethical thought. Religious thought as basis of systems of ethics. Contemporary approaches to methods of value organization and moral choices. Prerequisite: A basic course in religious studies. LEC
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Views of war and peace in various faith traditions throughout the world. Examination of teachings and action of religious groups and selected individuals, including use of war rhetoric and differing theological and social understandings of peace. Lecture, seminar discussion, and research assignment require preparation and participation by students. Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. LEC
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Study of religious, cultural, and social traditions toward understanding the nature and purposes of human conflict. Analysis of various meanings of peace, with emphasis on study of nonviolent approaches to management of conflict. Class discussion, readings, and individual research projects. (Same as COMS 669.) Prerequisite: Junior standing or above. LEC
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An examination of utopian communities in North America from the seventeenth century to the present. The course will survey the history, literature, and social dynamics of representative communal societies and movements including the Shakers, the Hutterites, the Oneida Community, Catholic religious communities, egalitarian communities, and other religious and secular communities. LEC
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An examination of the roles, images, and status of women in Christianity from its origin to the contemporary period and in its missionary expansion from the ancient Near East through Europe, North and South America, Africa, and Asia. LEC
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This course examines Russian Orthodoxy as a religious system and the institution of the Russian Orthodox Church from its first appearance in Russia to the present. It focuses on beliefs and practices of the clergy and the laity; institutional structures; the relationships between Church and State; interaction with non-Orthodox religious communities; responses to Soviet atheist policies; Orthodox influences on political theory, philosophy, literature, and the fine arts. (Same as REES 704.) LEC
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An analysis of selected religious text or texts from Judaism, Islam, or Christianity in translation. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: REL 512, REL 515, REL 526, REL 530, REL 532, REL 539, or REL 570 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Analysis of a selected religious text or texts from India, China, or Japan, in translation. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. (Same as EALC 733.) Prerequisite: REL 507, REL 508, REL 509, or permission of instructor. LEC
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An analysis of the thought of selected thinkers of the Christian, Jewish, and/or Islamic traditions. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: REL 512, REL 515, REL 526 , REL 530, REL 532, REL 539, or REL 570 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Analysis of the religious thought of selected thinkers of India, China, and/or Japan, traditional and modern. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. (Same as EALC 732.) Prerequisite: REL 507, REL 508, REL 509, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Relationship of religious groups to movements for social change: influence of religious groups on social change, and the impact of efforts toward social change in religious groups. Prerequisite: REL 171, REL 371, REL 377, or equivalent. LEC
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Seminar focusing on religious issues in some important texts of modern social criticism from the French Revolution to the present day. Prerequisite: An introductory course in religion. LEC
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Analysis of selected issues wherein religion and the formation and definition of a selected nation or nations intersect. LEC
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Analysis of selected Western religions and their relationships to selected Western societies. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: REL 512, REL 515, REL 526 , REL 530, REL 532, REL 539, or REL 570 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Analysis of selected Asian religions and their relationship to selected Asian societies. May be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. (Same as EALC 776.) Prerequisite: REL 507, REL 508, REL 509, or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Examination of symbols, images, scriptures, rites, teachings and scholarship regarding gender definitions and performance in various religious traditions. LEC
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Seminar exploring sociological, psychological, anthropological, and other theories regarding religious experience. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of selected theorists concerned with the nature of religion conducted by methodological analysis of the theories, data, and conclusions. LEC
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Interdisciplinary seminar, drawing on the literature of social, medical, and professional ethics, with special attention to religious perspectives on meanings of health and the delivery of health care. Of particular interest to health-related professions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Selected studies, as announced in Schedule of Classes, in the history and religious literature of Judaism, Christianity, religion in America, Islam, and Asian religions. Course may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Selected studies, as announced in Schedule of Classes, in Asian, Middle Eastern, and Western religious thought, mysticism, and religious ethics. Course may be taken more than once if subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Special topics to be announced in Schedule of Classes, according to research interests of faculty and students. A particular aspect of the study of religion and culture will be emphasized. Course may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Selected studies, as announced in Schedule of Classes, in the history and analysis of symbols, images, scriptures, rites, and teachings defining women's roles in various religious traditions. Course may be taken more than once if the subject matter varies sufficiently. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A special reading course for candidates for advanced degrees, faculty members, and graduate or undergraduate students from other schools or departments, designed to aid them in obtaining a reading knowledge for purposes of research. An intensive study of the fundamentals of grammar proceeding to the reading of material of medium difficulty. The course does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Presupposes no previous study of Russian. LEC
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A continuation of RUSS 100. Completion and review of the fundamentals of grammar, with emphasis on reading and translation of learned, scientific, or technical writing and other material of an advanced nature. Each student will also have special assignments in his or her particular field. This course does not satisfy any part of the undergraduate language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 100. LEC
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First semester. Five hours of basic language acquisition and two hours of oral practice per week. Essentials of grammar, practice in comprehending, speaking, reading, and writing Russian. LEC
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Second semester. Five hours of basic language acquisition and two hours of oral practice per week. A continuation of RUSS 104. Prerequisite: RUSS 104. LEC
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Intensive course in elementary Russian providing the student with a complete survey of Russian grammar, and proficiency in understanding, reading, and speaking basic Russian. Twenty contact hours per week. Same content as RUSS 104 and RUSS 108 combined. LEC
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Fundamentals of Russian grammar, reading, speaking, and writing. Course designed to accommodate the needs of students regardless of age, educational background, or occupation. No previous knowledge of Russian or other foreign languages required. LEC
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Continuation of RUSS 150. Does not fulfill BA foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 150 or equivalent. LEC
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This course is designed to develop speaking, reading, and listening proficiency within the context of detailed grammatical review. The course meets five hours a week for six hours credit. It is especially recommended for potential majors in Russian, for area-studies students, and for students intending to apply for study abroad in Russia. Prerequisite: RUSS 108, RUSS 110, or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of RUSS 204. Completes the undergraduate foreign language requirement. The course is designed to develop speaking, reading, and listening proficiency within the context of detailed grammatical review. It is especially recommended for potential majors in Russian, for area-studies students, and for students intending to apply for study abroad in Russia. Students who have completed only RUSS 212 may enroll with the permission of the instructor. Prerequisite: RUSS 204 or equivalent. LEC
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A review of Russian and further development of all four language skills. This course is intended for non-specialists and for students fulfilling the language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 108 or RUSS 110. LEC
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Continuation of RUSS 212. More focused development of students' oral skills and reading abilities. This course fulfills the college foreign language requirement. Prerequisite: RUSS 204 or RUSS 212. LEC
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Fundamentals of Russian grammar, reading, speaking, and writing. Course designed to accommodate the needs of students regardless of age, educational background, or occupation. Does not count towards the fulfillment of the undergraduate language requirement. Does not count towards the undergraduate major in Slavic. Prerequisite: RUSS 152 or equivalent. LEC
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A continuation of RUSS 250. Does not count towards the fulfillment of the undergraduate language requirement. Does not count towards the undergraduate major in Slavic. Prerequisite: RUSS 250 or equivalent. LEC
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A practical Russian language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Russian. Designed for students who have had four semesters of Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or RUSS 216. LEC
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A practical Russian language course involving advanced study of the grammar, reading of texts on a variety of subjects, conversation, and composition. Taught in Russian. Designed for students who have had two and one-half or more years of Russian language. Prerequisite: RUSS 504. LEC
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This course focuses on the active mastery of language structures and vocabulary needed for people using Russian in professional capacities, particularly such as business and journalism. Materials will be drawn from the current Russian press and electronic media. Designed for students who have had basic language training and want to develop specialized language skills. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or RUSS 216. LEC
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A continuation of RUSS 512. Prerequisite: RUSS 504, RUSS 512, or RUSS 522. LEC
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Preparation of hitherto untranslated works, possibly with the intention of submitting for publication. Training and practice in the skills of oral interpretation. Prerequisite: Two years minimum of Russian language courses. LEC
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A continuation of RUSS 522. LEC
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Held in Russia. Twenty-four hours of class work weekly, plus lectures and excursions, for six weeks at St. Petersburg University. Prerequisite: RUSS 208 or the equivalent of twenty-two hours of Russian language courses. LEC
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Sixteen weeks of intensive Russian language and literature classes held at Saint Petersburg University, Russia. Classes in advanced phonetics, conversation, and grammar as well as lectures on literary and other cultural topics. Prerequisite: Minimum of five semesters of Russian language study at the college level or its equivalent. LEC
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This advanced Russian language class explores the monuments of Russian culture (1700-1980) in the context of the country's history, customs, artistic traditions and literary trends. It is designed to develop reading, writing, and speaking skills of advanced language students and includes the preparation of written and oral reports in Russian. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC
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This advanced Russian language class explores issues in contemporary Russian culture (literature and the arts, societal trends and issues, politics, and national life) based on Russian film, television, and print materials. It is designed to develop reading, writing, and speaking skills of advanced language students who wish to develop high levels of fluency, accuracy, and idiomatic expressiveness. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC
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A survey of fundamental issues in Russian phonetics, morphology, and syntax. The course will develop reading, writing, and speaking skills necessary for discussing and analyzing the major linguistic categories of Russian. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC
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Readings for this advanced Russian language class will be drawn from representative prose, poetry, and drama of 19th or 20th century authors. The course will develop reading, writing, and speaking skills necessary for discussing and analyzing the major texts and literary trends of the Russian tradition. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC
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Practical examination of the features of stylistic registers available in contemporary Russian, ranging from slang to colloquial speech to educated journalistic, scientific, and literary styles. The course will develop reading, writing, and speaking skills necessary for discussing and analyzing stylistic registers. Includes the preparation of both written and oral reports. Discussion format; conducted entirely in Russian. Prerequisite: RUSS 508 or equivalent. LEC
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Prerequisite: Two years of Russian, and consent of instructor. IND
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An introduction to the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) and alternatives to SDLC uses in information studies projects and applications. Case studies will be used to illustrate methods of successful analysis of entire projects, including problem definition and analysis, design processes, testing, and implementation. Prerequisite: One year of programming experience or classes. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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An introduction to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) including the need for project management, phases of the project life cycle, tools and techniques for planning (PERT, CPM), and the role of team work and communication. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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This course will focus on the specifications through implementation phase of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC) at an advanced level including technical design, coding and testing, problem management, systems testing, implementation and post-implementation. Prerequisite: SA&D 401. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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Introduces the student to the basic Object Oriented (OO) terminology and how OO differs from a procedural approach. It details the deliverables that are created in the analysis and design phase using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). Students will also learn to use a CASE tool to document the analysis and design deliverables. Prerequisite: SA&D 401. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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Survey of elements of systems architecture including types of architecture, quality attributes, design patterns and frameworks, deployment issues, and developing architecture plans. Prerequisite: SA&D 401. Restricted to students admitted to the Systems Analysis and Design Certificate program. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. IND
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This course presents a historical survey of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden. In a comparative framework, the course focuses on a variety of central aspects that shaped Scandinavia from the Viking Age to the present. LEC
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This course is designed to impart a general knowledge of life in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden, with emphasis on social and cultural conditions, against a geographical and historical background, from the Viking age to the present. Slides and other illustrated materials. (Same as EURS 510.) LEC
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Intensive study of one or more major authors from the literatures of Scandinavia. May be repeated. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in Scandinavian languages and linguistics. The course deals with the linguistic analysis of language rather than the acquisition of a particular language. May be repeated. Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor is required. RSH
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Introduction to the grammar and reading of the prose literature of the "saga-age" (1100-1350). Varied selections from the literature provide the context in which the language is discussed. LEC
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Intensive discussion of a single longer saga or several shorter works, or a combination of these on a single theme. Dialectal differences between W. Norse and older Germanic dialects will be noted. Prerequisite: SCAN 906. LEC
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First semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking and writing a Slavic language. Simple readings from selected texts. Course may be used to teach the fundamentals of any Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, etc. LEC
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Second semester. Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking and writing a Slavic language. A continuation of SLAV 104 in those languages whose fundamentals were being taught in SLAV 104. Prerequisite: SLAV 104 or equivalent (in same language). LEC
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An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC
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An introduction to the principal achievements of Russian cultural history, with particular emphasis on literature, folklore, spirituality, and the visual arts. LEC
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A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC
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A survey of the principal works of Russian literature including such authors as Pushkin, Gogol, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Pasternak, Solzhenitsyn, and others. LEC
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An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC
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An introduction to the various forms of folklore among the Slavic peoples, with particular emphasis on the folk literature, customs, and artifacts of Russia, Poland, and the South Slavic countries. LEC
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Second-year level course in a Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: SLAV 108 (in same language). LEC
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Second-year level course in a Slavic language, for example, Slovenian, Macedonian, Slovak, with emphasis on reading, composition, and conversation. Prerequisite: SLAV 204 or equivalent (in same language). LEC
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This course presents an introduction to the study of the culture of the South Slavs and other peoples of Southeastern Europe, combining background modules in geography, linguistic culture, history, folklore and contemporary cultural criticism with critical 16 viewings of artistic films. The course serves as an introduction to humanistic inquiry about the peoples and cultures of Southeastern Europe. LEC
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This course is similar in content to SLAV 316, but with an additional honors project. Prerequisite: Eligibility for or admission to the university Honors Program. LEC
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Jews and Slavs have shared territory from the Middle Ages to the present day. The contact between these culturally and linguistically distinct groups have shaped many centuries of Eastern European history - from the extreme violence of the pogroms to long periods of peaceful coexistence and cooperation. "Jews and Slavs" examines the history and cultural geography of Slavic-Jewish contact from the perspectives of both groups. Through literature, film, journalism, and folklore, students learn about the profound influence Jews and Slavs have had on each other, the uneasy feelings that accompanied their interactions, and the creative and fascinating impact their interaction had on both cultures. (Same as JWSH 318.) LEC
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An overview of the languages and peoples of Russia and East-Central Europe, including the Slavic and Baltic languages, Romanian, and Albanian. Topics addressed include language prehistory, writing systems, and the relationship between language and national identity. Emphasis on language issues as a background to current events in order to impart an appreciation of the area, its uniqueness and complexity. LEC
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