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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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This advanced course provides in-depth reading and discussion of several current topics including second language acquisition within a generative framework, processing approaches to second language acquisition, and the role of input and learnability principles in second language acquisition. Both theoretical and methodological issues are discussed. Prerequisite: LING 415 and LING 325; or permission of instructor. LEC
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Examines the data and methodologies of the disciplines that comprise Cognitive Science, an interdisciplinary approach to studying the mind and brain. Topics may include: consciousness, artificial intelligence, linguistics, education and instruction, neural networks, philosophy, psychology, anthropology, evolutionary theory, cognitive neuroscience, human-computer interaction, and robotics. (Same as PHIL 418, PSYC 418, and SPLH 418.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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This course provides a foundation for designing, conducting, and critically evaluating quantitative and qualitative research in the language sciences. Topics include formulating a research hypothesis, participant selection, ethical considerations, the scientific method, validity, reliability, data collection, dependent and independent variables, descriptive and inferential statistics. This course serves students who are interested in the basics of research design and statistics for the study of language. Prerequisite: A 300 level linguistics course. LEC
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An introductory course in the acquisition of child language. The course will cover relevant historical studies of child language but will focus primarily on recent psycholinguistic approaches toward the description of the process by which a child acquires his native language. Phonological, syntactic, semantic, cognitive, pragmatic, sociolinguistic, and anthropological aspects of the acquisition process are covered. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC
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The study of language as a symbolic system. Exploration into the interrelatedness of linguistic systems, of nonlinguistic communicative systems, and of other cultural systems. (Same as ANTH 430.) LEC
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A detailed examination of issues in the processing of language. The course provides a survey of research and theory in psycholinguistics, reflecting the influence of linguistic theory and experimental psychology. Spoken and written language comprehension and language production processes are examined. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics or permission of instructor. LEC
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An in-depth examination of selected topics in psycholinguistics. Topics may include spoken language processing, written language processing, neurolinguistics, prosody, and syntactic processing. Prerequisite: LING 435 or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course explores how language is represented and processed in the human brain. This includes a critical survey of the foundations and the current research in the cognitive neuroscience of language, focusing on the techniques of functional brain imaging (fMRI, PET, EEG. MEG, and related methods), and research on aphasia and other language disorders. This course also includes a component providing laboratory experience with brain imaging research on language. Prerequisite: At least one course in linguistics or permission of the instructor. LEC
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This course introduces the tools and techniques necessary to analyze fieldwork data, including research design, recording and elicitation techniques, computational data processing and analysis, and field ethics. The course also covers field recording and data analysis technology, along with methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation and analysis of language context. Practice of techniques is provided via short studies of at least one language. Prerequisite: LING 305 or permission of instructor. LEC
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The elicitation and analysis of phonological, grammatical, and discourse data from a language consultant. In-depth research on one language. Techniques of research design, methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. Prerequisite: LING 305, LING 312, and LING 325 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to the nature and distribution of North American Indian languages. Not open to students with credit in LING 747. Students taking this course at the 700 level will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC
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Examines issues and problems associated with language use in sub-Saharan Africa from a sociological perspective. Topics covered include an overview of the types of languages spoken on the continent: indigenous languages, colonial languages, pidgins and creoles, and Arabic as a religious language; problems associated with the politics of literacy and language planning; writing and standardization of indigenous languages; and the cultural and ideological dilemmas of language choice. (Same as AAAS 470.) Prerequisite: AAAS 103, AAAS 305, or LING 106; or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of computer-based approaches to the study of morphology and syntax. In addition to its relevance for basic linguistic research, computer-based syntactic analysis in the form of parsers and syntactic/string generators, provide model testers for the linguistic and analytical tools for the computer scientist concerned with language applications. When taught with LING 783, students at the 700 level will have different course requirements. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC
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A special research project or directed readings in an area of linguistics not covered in other courses. No more than 3 hours of LING 490 may be applied toward the requirements for the major. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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The content, prerequisites, and credits of this course will vary. May be repeated. IND
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The content, prerequisites, and credits of this course will vary. May be repeated. (Distribution credit given for two or three hours only.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. IND
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Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a linguistic topic. Prerequisite: A grade-point average of 3.5 in linguistics and 3.25 in all courses, and consent of the major adviser. IND
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A second semester course in child language that explores the acquisition of morphology, syntax, and the ways in which morphology and syntax interact in linguistic theory and language development. Topics covered in the course include agreement, case, null subjects, question formation, pronoun binding, quantification, and control. Prerequisite: LING 325 or LING 425 or consent of instructor. LEC
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The course examines the links between structure, patterns of use, language choice, and language attitudes in the diglossic and bi-lingual Arabic-speaking communities. It also explores language as a reflector and creator of Arab culture (e.g. linguistic encoding of politeness, the Quranic text as the spoken and written word, the role of tropes in Arabic rhetoric). The topics for discussion range from the micro-level language choice to the macro-level issues of national language policies and planning within the domain of government and education across the Arab world. (Same as AAAS 543) LEC
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An introduction to the Indigenous writing of Mesoamerica, primarily Epi-Olmec and Mayan hieroglyphic writing. The course will survey the languages of the cultures that originated writing in the New World, and demonstrate the methods being used to decipher Mesoamerican hieroglyphic writing. The connections between language, culture, and writing will be highlighted. Prerequisite: An introductory linguistics course. LEC
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A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Japanese and the use of the language in social/cultural contexts. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. (Same as EALC 570.) LEC
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A detailed study of the phonological and grammatical structure of Chinese and the interactions between language and culture. Depending on student interests, a unit on the pedagogy of teaching Chinese as a foreign language may also be included. Primarily for students who want a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. (Same as EALC 572.) LEC
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A detailed study of a language, including its phonological, morphological, syntactic and semantic characteristics. The course provides students with a linguistic knowledge of the language rather than a practical command of it. Prerequisite: A course in linguistics. LEC
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An introduction to the theory and techniques of linguistic (NEW) science for majors and others intending to do advanced work in linguistics. Emphasis on the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. Lectures and laboratory sessions. Will not count toward any graduate degree in linguistics. Not open to students who have taken LING 106 or LING 107. LEC
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This course provides a basic introduction to the study of human speech sounds. Topics to be covered include anatomy and physiology of the speech production apparatus, transcription and production of the world's sounds, basic acoustics, computerized methods for speech analysis, acoustic characteristics of speech sounds, stress, and intonation. A 'hands on' laboratory project is part of the course. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC
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The fundamental issues, methods, and theories in contemporary linguistic anthropology. (Same as ANTH 706.) Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of the instructor. LEC
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This course is a continuation of Phonetics I (Ling 705) and provides a more detailed survey of acoustic and auditory phonetics. Topics to be covered include vocal tract acoustics, quantal theory, speaker normalization, theories of speech perception, prosody, the phonetics of second language acquisition, and the production and perception of cues to gender, talker, region, and socio-economic status. In addition, a number of laboratory projects will be required. Prerequisite: LING 705. LEC
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Practice in applying the techniques of phonological, grammatical, and syntactic analysis learned in introductory linguistics to data taken from a variety of languages of different structural types. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. Not open to students who have taken LING 308. LEC
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Introduction to the study of language acquisition: the significant findings, the basic methodological procedures, and some of the more recent theoretical accounts. Not open to students who have taken LING 425. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC
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This course is an introduction to phonological theory. It focuses on crucial phonological concepts such as underlying and surface representations, phoneme and allophone, contrast, alternation, neutralization, distinctive features, and syllable. It provides the basic skill set for phonological analysis, including UR selection, rule notation, rule ordering, and common phonological universals. It also touches on theory-building in phonology, with discussions on the external motivations for phonological grammar, how to lay out the predictions of a theoretical proposal, and how phonological predictions can be empirically tested. Prerequisite: LING 705. LEC
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This is an advanced course on modern phonological theory. It discusses phonology as an interdisciplinary and experimental discipline and presents current development in both experimental techniques that shed light on speakers' phonological knowledge and the formal modeling of speakers' phonological grammar. Issues of learnability and how phonological acquisition can be modeled will also be touched upon. Prerequisite: LING 712. LEC
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Introduction to the study of second language acquisition: The application of theoretical linguistics to the description of the language a learner acquires, and to the process of acquisition. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC
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This advanced course will provide in-depth reading and discussion of several current topics including second language acquisition within a generative framework, processing approaches to second language acquisition, and the role of input and learnability principles in second language acquisition. Both theoretical and methodological issues will be discussed. Prerequisite: LING 715; LING 725, which may be taken concurrently, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course provides a foundation for designing, conducting, and critically evaluating quantitative and qualitative research in the language sciences. Topics include formulating a research hypothesis, participant selection, ethical considerations, the scientific method, validity, reliability, data collection, dependent and independent variables, descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will serve students who are interested in the basics of research design and statistics for the study of language. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC
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Different languages use different linguistic mechanisms to encode meanings. This course surveys grammatical concepts and categories found in the world's languages including tense, aspect, mood, voice, person, and number as well as case relations such as nominative, accusative, ergative, and absolutive. Basic word order typology and discourse functions such as topic, focus, and cohesion are introduced. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of languages to illustrate how the same concept may be encoded differently, i.e., morphologically, syntactically, or lexically, in different languages. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC
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The basics of theoretical syntax, examining the principles of universal grammar. Topics include phrase structure, relations among syntactic constituents, and the nature of syntactic rules and lexical categories. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC
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An advanced course covering one or more current theories of syntax. The course will provide in-depth reading and discussion on the major areas of syntactic theory including universal grammar, phrase structure theory, lexical projections of argument structure, binding, control, locality condition, constraints on representation, and the relation between syntax and the semantic module. Prerequisite: LING 725. LEC
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An exploration of several topics in word structure and formation. Covers three broad areas: traditional morphology, morpho-phonology, and morpho-syntax. Traditional morphology includes a survey of several kinds of word formation processes, the internal structure of words, morpheme types, inflection, paradigms, derivation, and compounding. Morpho-phonology deals with phonological constraints on morphological processes and prosodic morphology. Morpho syntax concentrates on the syntactic properties of morphological phenomena and interaction of syntactic processes and morphology. The course has a strong emphasis on cross-linguistic comparative morphology. Prerequisite: LING 712, LING 725, or permission of instructor. LEC
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The study of language as it concerns anthropology. Language systems in relation to culture, language taxonomy, semantics, linguistic analysis as an ethnographic tool. (Same as ANTH 730.) LEC
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A study of meaning in natural language usage. Emphasis on referential semantics. Set theory, propositional and first-order logic, and intensional and modal logic as they relate to nature. Questions that arise in representing the meanings of natural language sentences in a formalized language. Prerequisite: LING 725. LEC
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A detailed examination of issues in the processing of language. The course will provide a survey of research and theory in psycholinguistics, reflecting the influence of linguistic theory and experimental psychology. Spoken and written language comprehension and language production processes will be examined. (Same as PSYC 735.) LEC
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An in-depth examination of selected topics in psycholinguistics. Topics may include spoken language processing, written language processing, neurolinguistics, prosody, and syntactic processing. (Same as PSYC 737.) Prerequisite: PSYC 735/LING 735 or consent of instructor. LEC
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We will explore how language is represented and processed in the human brain. This will include a critical survey of the foundations and the newest state-of-the-art research in the cognitive neuroscience of language, focusing on the techniques of functional brain imaging (fMRI, PET, EEG, MEG, and related methods), and research on aphasia and other language disorders. This course will also include a laboratory component providing hands-on experience with brain imaging research on language. Prerequisite: LING 700 or equivalent course. LEC
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A second semester course in child language which explores the acquisition of morphology, syntax and the ways in which morphology and syntax interact in linguistic theory and language development. Topics covered in the course include agreement, Case, null subjects, question formation, pronoun binding, quantification, and control. Prerequisite: LING 709 and LING 725 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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The tools and techniques necessary to analyze linguistic fieldwork data, including research design, recording and elicitation techniques, computational data processing and analysis, and field ethics. Techniques of research, field recording, and data analysis technology. Methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. Practice of techniques via short studies of at least one language. (Same as ANTH 740.) Prerequisite: LING 700 or permission of instructor. LEC
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The elicitation and analysis of phonological, grammatical, and discourse data from a language consultant. In-depth research on one language. Techniques of research design, methods of phonetic transcription, grammatical annotation, and analysis of language context. (Same as ANTH 741.) Prerequisite: LING 705 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to the nature and distribution of North American Indian languages. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC
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Theories and case studies of languages in contact. Areal and genetic linguistics, genesis of pidgins and creoles, multilingualism. Social, political, economic, and geographic factors in language change. (Same as ANTH 748.) Prerequisite: A course in Linguistics. LEC
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Selected topics in Linguistics and Linguistic Anthropology, focusing on dominant and/or minority languages of China, Central Asia, or a particular region of Central and Eastern Eurasia. Topics may include any subfield of linguistics, including language contact, typology, dialectology, and sociolinguistics. Topic for semester to be announced. (Same as ANTH 749.) Prerequisite: A course in Linguistics. LEC
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A survey of methods for studying phonological, morphological, syntactic, and semantic change during language development. Methods include: diary interpretation, language sample analysis, probe elicitation tasks, and clinical assessment. (Same as PSYC 782.) LEC
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A survey of computer-based approaches to the study of phonology, morphology, and syntax. In addition to its relevance for basic linguistic research, computer-based work on phonology is central to current research in speech analysis, speech synthesis, and the major artificial intelligence effort described as speech understanding. Computer-based morphological analysis is of theoretical interest to the linguist as well as a major component in content analysis, information retrieval, and other related application areas. Computer-based parsers and syntactic/string generators provide model testers for the linguist and analytical tools for the computer scientist concerned with language applications. Prerequisite: An introductory linguistics course. LEC
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The content and prerequisites of this course will vary. May be repeated. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to the field of linguistics. Topics include research literature and research methods, thesis and grant writing, and ethics in linguistic research. Required for all first-year graduate students in linguistics. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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A review and discussion of current issues in children's language acquisition. May be repeated for credit. Students are graded S/F. (Same as ABSC 797, PSYC 799 and SPLH 799.) (Formerly HDFL 797.) LEC
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An advanced study of the relations between language and culture. Subject will vary each semester. Students may repeat the course more than once. (Same as ANTH 810.) LEC
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An analysis of recent theoretical issues and research problems in the study of children's acquisition of language. Prerequisite: LING 709 or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is primarily for students actively engaged in experimental linguistic research. The course provides students with the opportunity to focus on their current research projects and involves critical analysis, presentation, and discussion of research design, methods, statistical analysis, and data interpretation. May be repeated. Prerequisite: An advanced course in Linguistics or permission of instructor. SEM
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Analysis of recent theoretical and methodological issues in the study of second language acquisition. Prerequisite: LING 716 or permission of instructor. LEC
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The content and prerequisites of this course will vary. May be repeated. LEC
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The aim of the seminar is to provide opportunity for interaction among faculty and students sharing an interest in North American Native languages and linguistics. Activities include reading, discussion, and criticism of literature on Amerindian languages and linguistics, and reports on current research of the participants. May be repeated. Prerequisite: LING 747. LEC
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Independent fieldwork with an informant on a language not normally offered at the University of Kansas, or on a non-standard dialect of one of the more accessible languages. Student must show evidence (file slips for grammatical and phonological analysis, dictionary slips, etc.) of having done the required amount of work without necessarily being able to turn in a completed analysis. Normally for three credits; six credits would be available under certain circumstances such as intensive summer work on location away from the university. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: LING 712 and LING 725. FLD
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A course for students writing answers to the preliminary Ph.D. examination and/or preparing to take the Oral Comprehensive Examination. Normally to be taken during the semester in which the student is submitting answers to the written preliminary examination. May be taken for a maximum of two semesters or twelve credits, whichever comes first. Does not count toward the minimum number of credits required for a graduate degree in linguistics. Graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory on the results of the examination. RSH
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Prerequisite: Written consent of instructor. RSH
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Mathematics (primarily algebra) preparatory to MATH 101. Qualification: Two years of high school college preparatory mathematics, algebra and geometry, and a score of 16 or more on ACT mathematics; or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. MATH 002 is the lowest level mathematics course offered at the University of Kansas. Students not prepared for MATH 101 will be permitted to enroll in MATH 002. However, before enrolling in MATH 002, such students are encouraged to prepare by self-study or by completing a beginning algebra course in high school, community college, or correspondence study. LEC
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Coordinate systems, functions and their graphs; linear, quadratic, general polynomial, exponential, and logarithmic functions; equations and inequalities. Not open to students with credit in MATH 104. Prerequisite: MATH 002, or two years of high school algebra and a score of 22 or higher on ACT mathematics, or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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The circular functions and their applications. Not open to students with credit in MATH 104. May not be used to fulfill the College mathematics requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 101, or two years of high school algebra and a score of 28 or higher on enhanced ACT mathematics, or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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An introduction to the elementary functions (polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric) and their properties. Intended primarily for students intending to enroll in MATH 121. Open for only two hours credit for students with credit in MATH 101. Not open to students with credit in MATH 103. Prerequisite: MATH 002, or two years of high school algebra and a score of 22 or higher on ACT mathematics, or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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This course has two purposes. First, to provide the student with some experience and insight into several areas of mathematics not normally covered in elementary courses. Typical topics which may be covered are number theory, geometries, introductory calculus, introductory probability and statistics. Second, to provide the student with some skill in handling abstract mathematical concepts. The material will develop dually the intuitive and axiomatic approach. A high degree of manipulative skill is not required for this course. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or two years of high school algebra and a score of 26 or higher on ACT mathematics, or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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An introduction to several areas in discrete mathematics and to their applications to contemporary life. Topics covered will include the collection and description of data, including an introduction to elementary probability and statistics; and the analysis of properties of size and shape, including measurement, symmetry, relationships, and patterns. Additional material will include topics chosen from the areas of management science, social choice, and decision making. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or two years of high school algebra and a score of 26 or more on ACT mathematics, or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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This course is designed to give the prospective elementary school teacher an overview of several components of the elementary school mathematics curriculum, including number systems, estimation, inequalities and order, sequences and patterns, sets, and relations and functions. The class meets each week for three one-hour instruction sessions and one two-hour laboratory session. This course may not be used to satisfy the College mathematics requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or equivalent placement. LEC
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Continuation of MATH 109, including geometry (including transformations) and elementary probability and statistics. Class meets each week for three one-hour instruction sessions and one two-hour laboratory session. This course does not serve as a prerequisite for any mathematics course. It may not be used to satisfy the College mathematics requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 109. LEC
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Introduction to topics in matrix algebra, probability, and statistics. Topics will include matrix operations, the use of matrices to solve systems of linear equations, elementary data analysis, elementary statistical procedures, sample spaces and probability measures, random variables, probability models, links between probability and statistics, and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or two years of high school algebra and a score of 26 or higher on the ACT mathematics, or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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Elementary differential and integral calculus, with applications in management and the biological sciences. Not open to students with credit in MATH 121. Prerequisite: MATH 101 or MATH 104, or two years of high school algebra and a score of 26 or higher on ACT mathematics, or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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Continuation of MATH 115 including exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions, techniques of integration, and the calculus of functions of several variables. Not open to students with credit in MATH 122 or MATH 118. Prerequisite: MATH 115, plus a course in trigonometry, or MATH 121. MATH 103 may be taken concurrently. LEC
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A course combining the material of MATH 103 and MATH 116. Open for only three hours credit to students with credit in MATH 103 or MATH 104, or five hours credit for students who do not have credit in MATH 103 or MATH 104. Not open for credit for students with credit in MATH 116. Prerequisite: MATH 115. LEC
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Differentiation and integration of algebraic and trigonometric functions. Applications to physical sciences and engineering. Open for only two hours credit to students with credit in MATH 115. Prerequisite: MATH 104; or MATH 103; or three years of college preparatory mathematics including trigonometry and a score of 28 or higher on ACT mathematics; or a qualifying score on the mathematics placement test. LEC
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Continuation of MATH 121, emphasis on applications. Introduction to partial differentiation and multiple integration. Open only for three hours credit to students with credit in both MATH 121 and MATH 116. Prerequisite: MATH 121 or MATH 116. LEC
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Differential and integral calculus and applications. Prerequisite: Three years of college preparatory mathematics including trigonometry, plus either (1) a score of 34 or more on ACT mathematics and a cumulative high school grade-point average of at least 3.5, or (2) a score of 32 or more on ACT mathematics and a cumulative high school grade-point average of at least 3.7. LEC
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Transcendental functions, methods of integration, parametric equations, vector algebra and its applications to analytic geometry. Introduction to partial derivatives and multiple integration. Prerequisite: MATH 121, or equivalent, and invitation of the Department of Mathematics. LEC
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Linear spaces, linear transformations and matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, differential calculus of vector-valued functions, multiple integrals, line integrals and surface integrals. Infinite series. Prerequisite: MATH 122 or MATH 142, or equivalent, and invitation of the Department of Mathematics. LEC
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Offered to provide opportunities for deeper understanding of freshman-sophomore mathematics through interactive learning. Topics will vary. May be repeated for additional credit. Prerequisite: Variable. LAB
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Linear ordinary differential equations, laplace transforms, systems of equations, and applications. Not open to those who have taken MATH 320. Prerequisite: MATH 122 or MATH 142 or equivalent. LEC
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Linear Ordinary Differential Equations, Laplace Transforms, Systems of Equations, Enrichment Applications. Prerequisite: Math 122 or Math 142 or equivalent, and invitation from the Department of Mathematics. Not open to students with credit in Math 320. LEC
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Multivariable calculus, multiple integration, and vector calculus. Prerequisite: MATH 122 or MATH 142 or equivalent. LEC
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Multivariable Calculus, Multiple Integration, Vector Calculus, Enrichment Applications. Prerequisite: Math 122 or Math 142 or equivalent, and invitation from the Department of Mathematics. LEC
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Introduces the integrated work environment provided by Mathematica and explores some of the most fundamental and significant ideas in scientific computing. Among the major topics covered are: Computational properties of numbers, significant digits and interval arithmetic, accumulation of errors and round-off errors, symbolic computation, scientific visualization, symbolic expression manipulation, and various programming styles (procedural, functional, rule-based). LEC
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Systems of linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, linear transformations, and applications. Not open to those who have taken MATH 590. Prerequisite: MATH 122 or MATH 142 or equivalent. LEC
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Systems of Linear Equations, Matrices, Vector Spaces, Linear Transformations, Enrichment Applications. Prerequisite: Math 122 or Math 142 or equivalent, and invitation from the Department of Mathematics. Not open to students who have taken MATH 590. LEC
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Designed for the study of special topics in mathematics at the freshman/sophomore level. May be repeated for additional credit; does not count toward the major or minor in mathematics. Prerequisite: Variable. LEC
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Directed reading on a topic chosen by the student with the advice of an instructor. May be repeated for additional credit. Consent of the department required for enrollment. IND
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Linear ordinary differential equations, series solutions. Laplace transforms. Systems of equations. Not open to those who have taken MATH 220. Prerequisite: MATH 223 and MATH 290, or MATH 143. LEC
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Linear differential equations with applications, Wronskian, power series solution, systems of differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 223 and MATH 290 or MATH 143, or equivalent and invitation of the Department of Mathematics. LEC
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Elementary descriptive statistics of a sample of measurements; probability; the binomial, Poisson, and normal distributions, populations and sampling from populations; simple problems of statistical inference. May not be counted for junior-senior credit toward a major in mathematics. Not open to students with credit in BUS 368, BIOL 570, MATH 465, MATH 526, or MATH 628. Prerequisite: MATH 101, MATH 104, or MATH 111. LEC
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Study of selected topics from Euclidean, non-Euclidean, and transformation geometry chosen to give breadth to the mathematical background of secondary and middle school teachers. May not be counted for junior-senior credit towards a major in mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 122. Students enrolled in MATH 409 must concurrently enroll in MATH 410. LEC
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Study of selected topics from mathematical history chosen to provide students with knowledge of major historical developments in mathematics including individual contributions and contributions from different cultures. These topics will include a historical development of Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometry. May not be counted for junior-senior credit towards a major in mathematics. Prerequisite: Math 122. Students enrolled in MATH 410 must concurrently enroll in MATH 409. LEC
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A rigorous introduction to those areas of discrete mathematics useful in computer science and related disciplines. Topics to be covered include: sets, relations, graphs, networks, boolean algebras, algorithms, finite state machines, and context-free languages. Prerequisite: MATH 122. LEC
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An introduction to the general methods of solving mathematical problems. Particular techniques such as specialization, generalization, contradiction, and induction will be presented. Topics presented may vary from semester to semester. Prerequisite: MATH 122 or equivalent or concurrent enrollment in MATH 122. LEC
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A careful formulation of convergence and limits of sequences and functions; continuity and properties of continuous functions; differentiation; the Riemann integral; mean-value theorems and the fundamental theorem of calculus. Not open to students with credit in MATH 765. Prerequisite: MATH 223 and MATH 290, or MATH 143. LEC
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