All schools & programs >

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Visit their website » Print...

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

Show courses in CLAS with a course number to
worth in .

There are 4,497 results.

Readings and discussions of modern Korean texts from various genres, including short stories, newspaper editorials and articles, and other expository and literary writings. Through reading these materials, students will build the vocabulary and reading proficiency needed to approach the level of an educated native speaker while learning about Korean culture and society. Prerequisite: KOR 508. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed to expand student's knowledge of the University community by exploring an academic theme and the connections between courses. Through the study of different topics students explore the inherent relationships among fields of study. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. Enrollment is limited to students participating in designated learning community. Concurrent enrollment in specified learning community courses is required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 hours if topic varies. SEM
View current sections...
Emphasizes the vocabulary of and fundamentals of reading and writing the Cherokee language. Students will have an opportunity to learn the language, beliefs, and religious practices of the Cherokee. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
Continuation of Cherokee Language I. Includes an intermediate level of vocabulary skill with increased emphasis on reading and writing. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: LA&S 110. LEC
View current sections...
An enhancement of communication, time management, and leadership skills. The students will explore resources and determine goals pertinent to their objectives regarding graduate school. Restricted to students in the Dean's Scholars Program. LEC
View current sections...
Special topics at the undergraduate level. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Special permission from the Provost's Office required. LEC
View current sections...
Introductory survey of the origin, evolution, and distribution of Indians throughout North America, location of tribes in historic times, their relationships to one another, and their responses to white penetration of the continent. Emphasis on American Indian leadership and major contributions of American Indian people to American society. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
An overview of current and historical issues which have resulted in policies and regulations affecting American Indians and Alaska Natives. The issues include: education, treaties, sovereignty and self-determination, religions, natural resources, legislation, jurisdiction, reservation and/or urban status, federal trust relationship, tribal economics and enterprises, American Indian policy, federal recognition, and current issues both regional and local. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction and general overview of federal Indian law and processes and its relationship to tribal governments. Focus will be on sovereignty and its relationship to the internal and domestic laws of the United States government, tribal governments, and the international community. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
An introductory study of the special relationship that exists between the federal government and tribal governments. Included will be a general overview of specific programs, laws, and court decisions that address the unique relationship that exists between two sovereign nations; the United States Government and tribal governments. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
Inventory and identify the resources currently available to tribal governments to include natural and human resources and those financial resources available to tribal governments from federal, state, and private resources. Included will be an economic analysis on how to best optimize available resources while recognizing the economic concept of constrained maximization. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
Examines the continuum of chemical abuse and dependency and the emotional, physical, intellectual, and spiritual effects of addictions on individuals, families, and communities. In addition, treatment approaches and relapse prevention efforts are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on integrating Native American understandings and responses to chemical addictions. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
Continuation of Cherokee language II. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: LA&S 120. LEC
View current sections...
This course is a continuation of LA&S 230, Cherokee Language III, and includes the study of grammar, with particular attention to speaking fluency and continued practice in reading and writing. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: LA&S 230. LEC
View current sections...
The beliefs and values of Western civilization from the eighth century BC to the close of the eighteenth century are compared with the ideas central to American Indian cultural traditions. Fulfills the Western Civilization I requirement for CLAS. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
The beliefs and values of Western Civilization since the close of the eighteenth century are compared with the ideas central to American Indian cultural traditions. Fulfills the Western Civilization II requirement for CLAS. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. LEC
View current sections...
Science and Mathematics students explore teaching as a career by teaching lessons in elementary classrooms in order to obtain first hand experience planning and implementing inquiry-based curriculum. This course is open to any student who has completed or is concurrently enrolled in a science or mathematics course at KU. LEC
View current sections...
Science and Mathematics students continue to explore secondary teaching as a possible career choice by teaching several lessons in a middle school classroom. The students build upon and practice lesson design skills that were developed in LA&S 290, in which they taught in elementary classrooms. Prerequisite: LA&S 290. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary study of different topics. Designed especially for freshmen and sophomores. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed to expand student's knowledge of the University community by exploring an academic theme and the connections between courses. Through the study of different topics students will explore the inherent interdisciplinarity of fields of study. Designed especially for juniors and seniors. Enrollment is limited to students participating in designated learning community. Concurrent enrollment in specified learning community courses is required. May be repeated for credit up to 4 hours. LEC
View current sections...
"The Art and Science of Computer Presentation." An inter-disciplinary course designed to explore current technology in "Computer Presentations" (various equipment and programs), research the field of information processing, and develop applications for interactive multi-media communications. Not open to students who have received credit for LA&S 740. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Students explore theories and strategies of teaching and tutoring writing across academic disciplines. They learn more about themselves as writers as they build a repertoire of writing techniques useful in their studies, in the workplace, and in their personal lives. By observing and consulting in the writing center, they understand how reflection leads to responsible/responsive and engaged practice. (Same as ENGL 400.) LEC
View current sections...
Integrates Native American traditional knowledge of ecology and biology with modern, western science. One purpose of the course is to preserve the unique knowledge and varied cultural traditions relating to the life sciences that are possessed by indigenous people. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Prerequisite: BIOL 100 or BIOL 150. LEC
View current sections...
Special topics at the junior/senior undergraduate level. Taught at Haskell Indian Nations University. Special permission from the Provost's office required. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides credit for supervised practical experiences in an occupational area of interest. In addition to the work-related activity, students complete reading and writing assignments, participate in an on-line discussion and create a final portfolio of internship accomplishments. Hours of credit recorded (1-5) are based on number of hours at internship site and agreement of instructor. Credit hours will be assigned a letter grade. Prerequisite: Consent of Instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary study of different topics. Topics include Sanskrit. Designed especially for Juniors and Seniors. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores theories motivating writing center administration and practice. Students will investigate the multiple functions of writing centers, from writing labs associated with college composition instruction, to decentralized resources for writing faculty teaching writing across the disciplines, to elementary, secondary, and community support centers for writers, to online consultation services. Students will choose a special interest or problem, and, from an administrative perspective, design a research study and propose actions such as creating policy, developing curricula, designing materials, or conducting assessments. (Same as ENGL 885.) Prerequisite: LA&S 400, ENGL 400, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
"The Art and Science of Computer Presentation." An inter-disciplinary course designed to explore current technology in "Computer Presentations" (various equipment and programs), research the field of information processing, and develop applications for interactive multi-media communications. Not open to students who have received credit for LA&S 340. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary study of a variety of topics from the Liberal Arts and Sciences. Usually intended for graduate students, but may also be taken by qualified upper level undergraduates. May be repeated for credit when topic differs. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of Latin America, as manifest in the arts and literature, history, and in environmental, political, economic, and social realities. Explores and critiques the principal themes and methodologies of Latin American Studies, with an aim towards synthesizing contributions from several different disciplines. Emphasizes the unique insights and perspectives made possible by interdisciplinary collaboration and provides students with a basic knowledge base for understanding Latin America today. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America at the undergraduate level. LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. LEC
View current sections...
This course will examine the cultural and social significance of Amerindian languages in Latin America. Spanish and Portuguese will be related in language situations to Amerindian languages, such as Quechua, Aymara, the Mayan languages, Nahuatl, and Guarani. Some African-substratum Creole languages will be used to illustrate the multifaceted relations between language and ethnic group, sex, nation, geography, social class, context, and social interaction. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken LAA 634. (Same as ANTH 379,.) LEC
View current sections...
Although approximately 600 indigenous languages are spoken by 30 million people in Latin America, public life is conducted in Spanish. The class provides a comprehensive survey of language issues in Latin America by analyzing the situation of minority language groups, language rights, language policies, and language planning, as well as by considering the questions that arise regarding bilingual education, literacy, and the role of minority languages in educational systems. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America at the undergraduate level. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study and research under faculty direction. Open to students wishing to graduate with honors in Latin American Studies and having a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Latin American Studies and at least 3.25 overall. Requires an interdisciplinary project concerning a specific topic involving at least two disciplines. Must be directed by a faculty member in Latin American Studies, approved by the Center Associate Director, and defended before a committee of at least three faculty members. To earn departmental honors, a student must take the course for two semesters (with a minimum grade of B the first semester, and an A the second). LEC
View current sections...
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. IND
View current sections...
Examines the sociolinguistic issues of multilingual countries in Latin America from an interdisciplinary perspective. Topics include but are not limited to linguistic inequality, the language of politics, language and education, urban and rural linguistic interaction, and indigenous and creole languages. Prerequisite: A liberal arts course with Latin American content. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major narrative trends including Amerindian languages and the analysis of "indigenista" literature. The African substratum of Latin American culture and its relation to concepts such as "marvelous realism" is explored. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are investigated as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The influence of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on their emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores the relationship between political development and cultural phenomena of Latin America from 1800 to the present, with special emphasis on gender, popular culture, and ideology. The influences of 20th-century ideologies and technology on cultural development in Latin America will also be examined. LEC
View current sections...
This course follows the development of U.S. Latino and Latin American cinema from its origins to the present and its relationship with literary discourse. U.S. Latino/Latin American cinema can be seen as a specific practice that cannot be reduced in all its manifestations to the institutional mode of production of the dominant Hollywood model. The course examines the creation of a national cinema that seems to be more dependent on a literary canon. Knowledge of Spanish is not required. LEC
View current sections...
The development of cultural identity in Latin America is traced through the study of major literary works of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The importance of "race," "gender," and "ethnicity" are explored as tools to define national identity in Latin America. The impact of modernization, industrialization, and nationalistic and populist thought on the emergence of distinctive writing and themes is also assessed. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Latin America. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the major indigenous traditions of Mesoamerica, the Andes, and lowland tropical Latin America. Coverage emphasizes how indigenous cultural traditions and societies have both continued and changed since the European Invasion and addresses such current issues as language rights, territorial rights, sovereignty, and state violence. Students enrolled in the 600-level section will be required to complete additional research and class leadership tasks. Not open to students who have taken ANTH 379 or LAA 334. LEC
View current sections...
This seminar uses a life-cycle approach to examine women's health (physical, mental, and spiritual) and their roles as healers. Special consideration is given to the effects of development programs on well-being, access to health care, and changing roles for women as healers. Cases will be drawn from a variety of Latin American contexts. (Same as ANTH 665 and WGSS 665.) Prerequisite: 6 hours course work in Anthropology and/or Women's Studies and/or Latin American Studies. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of bibliographic and reference sources for research on Latin America in the humanities and social sciences. Designed to prepare students for library research at the seminar, thesis, or dissertation level. Prerequisite: Junior standing, reading knowledge of Spanish or Portuguese. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary seminar incorporating significant and pertinent materials from the fields of anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature. Required of all graduate students enrolled in the Master of Arts program in Latin American Area Studies. Prerequisite: LAA 700 (may be taken simultaneously with LAA 701 if both courses offered during same semester). LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary research seminar on historical and contemporary issues in Brazil, incorporating information and analysis from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature and culture. Required for the Brazilian Graduate Certificate. Prerequisite: Recommended reading proficiency in Portuguese. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary research seminar on historical and contemporary issues in Central America and Mexico, incorporating information and analysis from such fields as anthropology, economics, geography, history, political science, sociology, and Spanish and Portuguese literature and culture. Required for the Central America & Mexico Graduate Certificate. Prerequisite: Recommended reading proficiency in Spanish. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation and research of interdisciplinary topics in Latin American Studies. RSH
View current sections...
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
View current sections...
An introduction to the Latin language. LEC
View current sections...
Integrates study of elementary Latin with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: Admission to Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Latin grammar concluded with selected readings. Prerequisite: LAT 104 or LAT 105, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Latin grammar concluded with selected readings, integrated with study of Roman culture. Prerequisite: LAT 105 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Attention to literary history and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 108 or LAT 109, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Systematic grammar review in conjunction with selected prose authors, such as Cicero or Caesar, with additional readings in Roman poetry. Exercises in literary analysis and/or prose composition. Prerequisite: LAT 109 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Vergil's Aeneid, with attention to literary interpretation and literary history. Prerequisite: LAT 112 or LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selections from Vergil's Aeneid, with attention to literary history. Exercises in literary interpretation and verse composition. Prerequisite: LAT 113 or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Composition in Latin prose, stressing the basic principles of Latin syntax and style. Recommended for majors and minors. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Cicero, Seneca, Petronius, Pliny, and Apuleius, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, and the satirists, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Caesar, Livy, and Tacitus, with attention to issues in Roman history and historiography. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Catullus, Horace, Tibullus, Propertius, Sulpicia, Ovid, and Martial, with attention to literary interpretation and historical context. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings from such authors as Plautus, Terence, and Seneca, with attention to literary interpretation, theater history, and performance. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Readings in Latin literature, selected in consultation with the instructor. May be repeated for up to twelve hours. Prerequisite: LAT 200 or LAT 201, or consent of instructor. IND
View current sections...
Individual directed research and preparation of an essay on a topic in Latin literature or language. Prerequisite: Eligibility for departmental honors and consent of essay adviser. IND
View current sections...
An examination of the grammar, syntax, and style of the Latin language through exercises in composition. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid, Statius. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Catullus, Horace, Propertius, Tibullus, Sulpicia, Ovid, Martial. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from authors such as Cicero, Livy, Seneca, Tacitus, Augustine. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Close reading of texts from Plautus, Terence, Horace, Petronius, Seneca, Juvenal, Apuleius. LEC
View current sections...
Extensive reading in a variety of Latin authors. LEC
View current sections...
Required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants in the teaching of Latin. May be repeated up to three semester hours credit in total. FLD
View current sections...
An introduction to teaching required of all assistant instructors and teaching assistants. Topics to include: pronunciation, etymology, Latin style, testing methods, and the selecting of texts. LEC
View current sections...
Selected readings for qualified students who desire special work on a flexible basis. May be repeated for credit, the maximum being twelve hours. Prerequisite: Undergraduate proficiency in Latin or equivalent. RSH
View current sections...
Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure and semantic structure of languages. The course will include a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and will introduce students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. (Same as ANTH 106). LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the fundamentals of linguistics, with emphasis on the description of the sound system, grammatical structure, and semantic structure of languages. The course includes a survey of language in culture and society, language change, computational linguistics and psycholinguistics, and introduces students to techniques of linguistic analysis in a variety of languages including English. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by consent of instructor. (Same as ANTH 107.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the relation between language and the human mind, focusing on language as a fundamental aspect of human cognition. Topics include what is innate and what is learned during first and second language acquisition, how we process language, and whether there are areas of the brain specialized for language. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the acoustic structure of speech intended for nonscience majors. Emphasis will be placed on the methods and standards by which scientists measure and evaluate the physical characteristics of speech. Topics will include: simple harmonic motion, the propagation of sound waves, aerodynamic aspects of vocal fold vibration, resonance, digital speech processing, frequency analysis, and speech synthesis. Three class hours and one laboratory per week. (Same as SPLH 120.) Prerequisite: MATH 101 or 104 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed for the study of special topics in Linguistics. course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
This course provides a basic introduction to the study of human speech sounds. Topics to be covered include anatomy and physiology of the speech production apparatus, transcription and production of the world's sounds, basic acoustics, computerized methods for speech analysis, acoustic characteristics of speech sounds, stress, and intonation. A hands on laboratory project is part of the course. Prerequisite: An introductory course in Linguistics. LEC
View current sections...
This course is a continuation of Phonetics I (LING 305/705) and provides a more detailed survey of acoustic and auditory phonetics. Topics to be covered include vocal tract acoustics, quantal theory, speaker normalization, theories of speech perception, prosody, the phonetics of second language acquisition, and the production and perception of cues to gender, talker, region, and socio-economic status. In addition, a number of laboratory projects are required. Prerequisite: LING 305. LEC
View current sections...
Practice in applying the techniques of phonological, grammatical, and syntactic analysis learned in introductory linguistics to data taken from a variety of languages of different structural types. Prerequisite: LING 106. LEC
View current sections...
This is an introductory course in phonology. It focuses on crucial phonological concepts such as the underlying and surface representations, phoneme and allophone, contrast, alternation, neutralization, distinctive features, and the syllable. It provides the basic skill set for phonological analysis, including how to discover phonological patterns, select underlying representations, and write phonological rules to capture the patterns. Common phonological universals in the world's languages will also be discussed. Prerequisite: LING 305. LEC
View current sections...
This is a survey course on modern phonological theory. It starts with the discussion of the conspiracy and duplication problems in rule-based phonology and works its way to Optimality Theory (OT). Topics in OT include its conceptual and empirical advantages over rule-based phonology, its potential problems and their possible remedies, the relevance of phonetics in OT constraints, correspondence theory, and how OT can be applied to prosodic phenomena such as stress and tone. It also focuses on theory-building in phonology, with discussions on the external motivations for phonological grammar, how to lay out the predictions of a theoretical proposal, and how phonological predictions can be empirically tested. Prerequisite: LING 312 or instructor consent. LEC
View current sections...
Language is an integral part of culture and an essential means by which people carry out their social interactions with the members of their society. The course explores the role of language in everyday life of peoples in various parts of the world and the nature of the relationship between language and culture. Topics include world-view as reflected in language, formal vs. informal language, word taboo, and ethnography of speaking. (Same as ANTH 320.) LEC
View current sections...
An honors section of LING 320 for students with superior academic records. Not open to students who have had ANTH 320 or LING 320. (Same as ANTH 321.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Different languages use different linguistic mechanisms to encode meanings. This course surveys grammatical concepts and categories found in the world's languages including tense, aspect, mood, voice, person and number, as well as case relations, such as nominative, accusative, ergative, and absolutive. Basic word order typology and discourse functions such as topic, focus, and cohesion are introduced. Examples will be drawn from a wide variety of languages to illustrate how the same concept may be encoded differently, i.e., morphologically, syntactically, or lexically, in different languages. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to generative syntax with special attention to theory and method. The course covers such topics as phrase structure, the lexicon, transformations and derivation. Prerequisite: LING 106. LEC
View current sections...
An advanced course covering one or more current theories of syntax. The course provides in-depth reading and discussion on the major areas of syntactic theory including universal grammar, phrase structure theory; lexicon and argument structure; binding, control, locality conditions; constraints on representation and derivation; and the relation between syntax and the semantic module. Prerequisite: LING 325. LEC
View current sections...
An exploration of several topics in word structure and formation. Covers three broad areas: traditional morphology, morpho-phonology, and morpho-syntax. Traditional morphology includes a survey of several kinds of word formation processes, the internal structure of words, morpheme types, inflection, paradigms, derivation, and compounding. Morpho-phonology deals with phonological constraints on morphological processes and prosodic morphology. Morpho- syntax concentrates on the syntactic properties of morphological phenomena and interaction of syntactic processes and morphology. The course has a strong emphasis on cross-linguistic comparative morphology. Prerequisite: Ling 312 and Ling 325, or permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A study of meaning in natural language usage. Emphasis on referential semantics. Set theory, propositional and first-order logic, and intensional and modal logic as they relate to natural language sentences in a formalized language. Prerequisite: A course in syntax. LEC
View current sections...
The formal features of language reflect a broad range of social factors, including age, context, culture, occupation, sex and social class. This course will introduce students to the ways social variables affect the forms of spoken and written language. Prerequisite: An introductory linguistics course or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores the relationship between language use and gender. The course will specifically focus on how gender affects the ways we use spoken language as well as how we interpret the speech of others. Topics to be discussed will include the function of language in social relationships and language variation in different social contexts. LEC
View current sections...
Human language may be characterized as possessing flexibility, which causes languages to be different from one another in different degrees. This course explores the way languages undergo change in time (historical linguistics), and the ways two or more languages are similar or different (comparative linguistics). The course teaches students how to establish whether languages are genetically related or belong to totally different language families. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the indigenous languages of Africa from a linguistic perspective, covering the main language families and their geographic distribution, and focusing on the features and structure of the more widely spoken and representative languages in each family (e.g. Fula, Hausa, Maninka, Swahili, Yoruba). (Same as AAAS 370.) LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the study of second language acquisition: The application of theoretical linguistics to the description of the language that a learner acquires, and to the process of acquisition. Prerequisite: An introductory course in linguistics. LEC
View current sections...
‹ First  < 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 > 

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.