All schools & programs >

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Visit their website » Print...

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

Show courses in CLAS with a course number to
worth in .

There are 4,497 results.

This graduate seminar will focus on interactions between the so-called Old and New Worlds in the three centuries following Columbus' voyages. The course will pay particular attention to the changes in the lives of Europeans, Africans, and the peoples of the Americas as a result of the emergence of transatlantic economies, empires, and cultural systems. LEC
View current sections...
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in the history of Europe between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The first in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
View current sections...
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in early modern European history. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The second in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
View current sections...
From the French Revolution into the contemporary era. The third in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
View current sections...
This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in modern European history. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The fourth in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive survey of significant works in the field from colonial times to the present, with attention to bibliography, research methods and needs, and leading issues in interpretation. LEC
View current sections...
Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of Colonial and Revolutionary America, including appropriate attention to new approaches and techniques in research. The first course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. Required of all U.S. history graduate students. LEC
View current sections...
Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of the United States in the 19th century. The third course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. LEC
View current sections...
Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of the United States in the 20th century. The third course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. LEC
View current sections...
This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of manhood, womanhood, and gender systems. (Same as AMS 835 and WGSS 835.) LEC
View current sections...
This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. It is designed to familiarize students with the most important and current historiography in the field. (Same as AMS 836 and WGSS 836.) LEC
View current sections...
This colloquium will approach the history of women from a comparative perspective through theoretical and topical readings on women in at least two different cultures. (Same as AMS 837 and WGSS 837.) LEC
View current sections...
This course provides an overview of theories and methods used in material culture studies and their application to historical research, writing, and presentation. Topics may vary from semester to semester, but could include vernacular architecture, museum studies, anthropology, cultural geography, historical archeology, and perceptual theory. The course will consist of intensive reading, discussion, and written work. While it is not limited to a particular geographical or chronological area, or discipline, given the state of the field most topics will be drawn from U.S. history. LEC
View current sections...
An inquiry into the source material upon a specific subject. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
View current sections...
Design and completion of an independent project, culminating in the production of a professional-quality paper based on original, primary source research. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. LEC
View current sections...
A research seminar oriented around cross-regional, comparative, and transnational aspects of history, culminating in production of a professional-quality paper based in original, primary source research. SEM
View current sections...
A research seminar in specialized aspects of Roman history. May be repeated for credit. LEC
View current sections...
A seminar involving the study of the importance and influence of the noble families of Rome on Roman history (200-27 B.C.) with special emphasis on the literary and numismatic evidence. Reading knowledge of Latin will be essential for this course. LEC
View current sections...
An analysis and criticism of the works of the most significant Roman historians from Sallust to Ammianus Marcellinus, including a comparison and contrast between the Latin and Greek historians who wrote during the Graeco-Roman period (150 B.C.-378 A.D.). LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to the techniques of reading, dating, and localizing medieval Latin manuscripts. LEC
View current sections...
A study of sources in some restricted fields and the presentation of research results. A reading knowledge of French or German or some other modern language is desirable. LEC
View current sections...
A research seminar focusing on new, actively-investigated and controversial themes in British history, chiefly c. 1660-1832. LEC
View current sections...
The study of the history of crime and protest in their relationship with the wider social and political theory of Britain and America. Specific topics may include the impact of industrialization, the notion of the 'moral economy,' the legal and ideological nature of the death penalty, the crowd in history, and the administrative and intellectual developments in policing, prisons, and asylums. LEC
View current sections...
A research and thesis seminar offered by several members of the Standing Field Committee in Modern European History. Students seeking advanced degrees in European history from the Renaissance to the present will enroll each semester for work on their theses and dissertations. May be repeated. LEC
View current sections...
A research seminar in Middle East history, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. The European impact on and relationships with the Middle East are stressed. LEC
View current sections...
A focus on major problems of historical interpretation and research investigation from Peter the Great to the present. LEC
View current sections...
A research seminar focused on a major theme or problem in Latin American history. LEC
View current sections...
This seminar focuses on sweeping socio-political upheavals such as occurred in Mexico in 1910, Guatemala in 1944, Bolivia in 1952, Cuba in 1959, and Nicaragua in 1979. After considering various sociological and political theories of revolution the seminar searches for an understanding of the basic reasons for revolutions in the countries mentioned (and failure of revolutionary efforts elsewhere) and possible common characteristics of the Latin American revolutionary process. LEC
View current sections...
Research seminar focusing on the role of ideas and ideologies, values and cultural norms in the history of Latin America. Political action, including rebellions, movements and strikes by the masses and efforts toward social control by elites will also be a major theme. Finally the course will examine the meaning of "social change" for Latin America and when it can be said that "social change" actually occurs. LEC
View current sections...
A research seminar in East Asian history. Prerequisite: Open only to graduate students having a reading knowledge of at least one East Asian language. LEC
View current sections...
A research and thesis seminar offered by several members of the Standing Field Committee in United States History. Students seeking advanced degrees in United States history will enroll in the seminar for theses and dissertation credit. May be repeated. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive, research-oriented study of American history from the 1580s to the 1760s. The course will cover both British America and New France. May be repeated. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive, research-oriented study of American history from 1760 to1800. May be repeated. LEC
View current sections...
This research seminar will focus on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. Students will research and write a paper using primary sources, and present those papers to the seminar for evaluation. (Same as AMS 973 and WGSS 873.) LEC
View current sections...
A research course focusing on selected topics in history. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive study of United States foreign policy during a selected period. LEC
View current sections...
An inquiry into major issues and methods in environmental history, viewed from both an American and modern world perspective. LEC
View current sections...
Study of issues and interpretations in the history of the American West from prehistory to the present, including attention to new approaches and techniques in research. LEC
View current sections...
Examines the various patterns of interpretation influencing current historiography of science: the substance and impact of "internalist" history, which deals with the evolution of scientific ideas; the diversity of "externalist" history, which stresses interaction between the scientist's activity and social environment. Readings and discussions will assess intellectual, chronological, socio-economic, theological, philosophical, national, institutional and literary aesthetic influences on the history of science. LEC
View current sections...
Writing and editing of materials in the student's professional portfolio. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. RSC
View current sections...
An inquiry into the source material upon a specific subject. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
View current sections...
An introduction to modern standard Hindi that emphasizes acquisition of basic language skills (speaking, comprehension, reading and writing) through a combination of lecture, drill, and work with the Devanagari script. LEC
View current sections...
A continuation of Beginning Hindi I that builds on basic skills of speaking and comprehension, and the writing and reading of the Devanagari script developed in Beginning Hindi I. Prerequisite: HNDI 110 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Beginning Hindi II. LEC
View current sections...
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar. Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 120 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi I. LEC
View current sections...
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension,reading and writing abilities in modern standard Hindi, with emphasis on grammar. Readings will be introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 210 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Intermediate Hindi II. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of special topics on Hindi culture, language and literature at the undergraduate level. May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi. Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 220 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi I. LEC
View current sections...
Enhancement of speaking, comprehension, reading and writing abilities in Hindi. Readings are introduced from representative genres of Hindi literature. Prerequisite: HNDI 310 or placement exam that establishes a level of proficiency in Hindi suited to Advanced Hindi II. LEC
View current sections...
Practical training for people intending to live, study, travel, or work in Hungary. Focus on conversational skills. Intensive practice in speaking and listening, with vocabulary about Hungarian geography, culture, and business. Introduction to basic grammar. Not for native speakers LEC
View current sections...
Essentials of grammar, practice in speaking, reading, and writing Hungarian. Five class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Hungarian. LEC
View current sections...
Continuation of grammar; practice in conversation, composition, and reading. Five class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Hungarian. Prerequisite: HNGR 104 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A continuation of HNGR 108. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Hungarian. Prerequisite: HNGR 108 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A continuation of HNGR 212. Structured grammar review, composition, conversation, with readings of literary and cultural texts. Three class meetings per week. Not open to native speakers of Hungarian. Prerequisite: HNGR 212 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Independent study and directed readings on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. Not open to native speakers of Hungarian. Prerequisite: HNGR 216. IND
View current sections...
The course provides an opportunity to gain effective exposure to intellectual values and methods under faculty guidance in a small seminar setting. The aims of the Freshman Honors Tutorial are: (1) to introduce students to key intellectual perspectives germane to the instructor's discipline; (2) to introduce students to some of the resources and methods available to scholars in the discipline; (3) to build a sense of community among honor freshmen from all across the campus. Required of all freshman honors students, open only to freshmen in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
An opportunity to investigate a broad topic across various subjects and disciplines. In alliance with the University Commons at Spooner Hall, this course examines a problem or topic from the perspectives of several disciplines across the arts, sciences, social sciences and humanities. The course is complemented by a dedicated annual university lecture series germane to the course's topic. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary survey to acquaint students with some of the main ideas, methods, and outstanding problems in various areas of scholarship. The organization of human knowledge inside and outside the university, as well as the implications of this organization for scholarship and society, are emphasized. Ideas and methods in various disciplines are contrasted and compared. Required of and open only to newly admitted students in the University Scholars Program. LEC
View current sections...
An opportunity to synthesize topic across various subjects and disciplines. This course examines a problem or topic from the perspectives of several disciplines. Open to qualified sophomores, juniors, and seniors in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary study of different topics. Designed especially for juniors and seniors. LEC
View current sections...
Individual and supervised study of an interdisciplinary topic or topics. May be repeated for a total of up to 6 hours. Up to one 3-hour enrollment will count as one course toward completion of the University Honors Program. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program and consent of the instructor. IND
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary seminar course designed for advanced-level students in the University Scholars Program. Faculty mentors are invited to attend. Will count toward completion of the University Honors Program. Prerequisite: HNRS 310 or concurrently. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education, perspectives and methods in the humanities, the humanities and human diversity, and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the humanities as a division of learning and to interdisciplinary study in the humanities. Topics include the history and role of the humanities in a liberal education; perspectives and methods in the humanities; the humanities and human diversity; and interdisciplinary approaches to understanding and interpreting texts. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the most influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization I includes readings from the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Membership in the College Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the most influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization II includes readings from the modern period. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or permission of department. LEC
View current sections...
Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. LEC
View current sections...
Honors version of HWC 150. Introduction to perennial themes that define human experience through reading and discussion of primary texts. Topics may include the nature of humanity; nature and the supernatural; the individual and the state. Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program, or permission of instructor LEC
View current sections...
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization I includes readings from the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Not open to freshmen except members of the Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A program of study emphasizing the reading and discussion of some of the influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western world. Western Civilization II includes readings from the modern period. Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204. Not open to freshmen except members of the Honors Program. LEC
View current sections...
A sequel to the two Western Civilization courses which offers the opportunity to examine influential works of literature, philosophy, history, and political thought written since the end of World War II. In keeping with the decline of colonialism and the growth of global and multicultural civilization since 1945, the readings of the course are selected from both Western and non-Western writers. LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary course, focusing on different topics and drawing on diverse media, cultures, and historical periods. Humanities-based, this course, depending on its topic, may include the arts, the social sciences, and the natural sciences. May be repeated for credit with different topics. LEC
View current sections...
The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as EURS 302.) LEC
View current sections...
The study of great books in English translation from antiquity through the fifteenth century from two or more national literatures. LEC
View current sections...
The study of great books in English translation from the sixteenth, seventeenth, eighteenth, and early nineteenth centuries from two or more national literatures. LEC
View current sections...
The study of great books in English translation in the modern period (late nineteenth and twentieth centuries) from two or more national literatures. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the art of ancient Greece and Rome (ca. 1000 B.C.E. -500 C.E.). Emphasis on major sites, architecture, sculpture, and painting. Illustrated lectures and discussion; use of the Wilcox Classical Museum. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. Not open to students who have taken both CLSX 526/HA526 and CLSX 527/HA 537, except with permission of the instructor. (Same as CLSX 317, HA 317.) LEC
View current sections...
Preparation for senior thesis project required of HWC majors. Introduction to writing strategies, library investigation, and time management skills. Open to HWC majors and others engaged in research and writing at the undergraduate level. Class will proceed by discussion of skills, methods, and examples, and will culminate in a written proposal from each student. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to recent cultural theory and interdisciplinary methods used across the humanities and qualitative social sciences. Includes examination of traditional views of the humanities and its implicit cultures along with discussion of new methodologies of cultural analysis. LEC
View current sections...
An overview of Western Legal education, both in historical and modern contexts. Legal subjects such as constitutional law, contracts, property, the courts and ethics are also studied. Students gain perspective on law as a profession, and the legal environments in which we live. Note: this course does not guarantee admission to law school or constitute entry into the legal profession as a career. It is intended to provide information and help students identify interests in the field of legal study. LEC
View current sections...
An integrated study of several disciplines such as history, philosophy, art, music, and literature as they relate to the twentieth century in one country, or one historical or aesthetic movement occurring during this time. LEC
View current sections...
Classical Greek and Roman attitudes to gender and sexuality compared and contrasted with modern nations and behaviors. Attention is paid to literature (dramatic, philosophical, medical, and legal texts) and archaeological evidence (vase painting, sculpture, and domestic architecture). The course may include the following topics: age divisions and rites of passage from childhood to maturity; marriage; conception, birth, and infanticide; the family; love; homoeroticism; property and economics; and sexuality and the law, politics, and religion. No knowledge of Greek or Latin is required. (Same as CLSX 374.) LEC
View current sections...
The study of the evolution of a cultural or literary tradition from the Graeco-Roman world into modern times. The theme of the course will normally vary from semester to semester; topics such as these may be examined: the analysis of a literary genre (e.g. drama, satire, lyric), the transformation of the ancient mythical heritage, the reception of ancient astronomy. Students should consult the Schedule of Classes for the theme of the course in a given semester. With departmental permission, may be repeated for credit as topic varies. (Same as CLSX 350.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of selected works in literary theory and of selected problems in literary interpretation and comparative literary methodology, designed to examine and apply systematically basic critical principles and approaches. Study of approaches such as feminism, Marxism, deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and cultural studies are carried out through discussion and writing. Prerequisite: Completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
The complete Divine Comedy will be read in English translation, with equal stress on each of its three parts--the Inferno, the Purgatory, and the Paradise. The poem will be explained for the general reader by specialists having a variety of perspectives. (Same as HIST 420.) LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary seminar on the relations of several of the humanities and the arts. Topics will vary, but the interrelation of the humanities and arts will be the central focus. Not open to freshmen and sophomores; recommended in the junior year. Required of students majoring in humanities. LEC
View current sections...
A seminar to result in a senior thesis in the student's area of emphasis in the major. Course includes seminar meetings and individual conferences with the instructor for guidance on topic selection, identification of a project director, investigation of resources, and instruction in writing strategies and documentation styles. Project proposal, completed thesis, and oral presentation required. Required of all students majoring in Humanities and Western Civilization. Not open to freshmen and sophomores; recommended in the senior year. Prerequisite: HWC 420 for students in the Humanities emphasis, and in Humanities and Literature emphasis, HWC 430 for students in the Western Civilization emphasis. IND
View current sections...
An introduction to the literature of encounters between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as EURS 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. (Same as EURS 435.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the role of animals (especially mammals), both wild and domesticated, in defining the nature of human beings and human culture through the disciplines of religious studies, philosophy, history, art and literature. Both western and non-western courses are examined. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the phenomenon of visions, their expression in various media, and theories of visionary experience from the humanities and social sciences, with a particular emphasis on critically evaluating the relationship between the visionary experience and its expression. (Same as REL 464). LEC
View current sections...
An examination of how illness and health have been conceptualized, expressed, and explored in Western literature and art, as well as a consideration of issues and health from the perspectives of philosophy and religious studies. (Same as REL 468). LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary analysis of the historical origins and present currents within American medicine. This is an integrated study of basic historical, political, economic and professional influences that underlie the character and practice of health care in our century. LEC
View current sections...
Examination of the symbols, images, scriptures, rites and teachings that define gender in various religious traditions. (Same as REL 477.) LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of a subject in fields or on topics not covered in regularly scheduled courses. May be repeated for a total of 6 hours. Does not replace or satisfy specific course requirements for the HWC major. May be counted as part of the total junior-senior credit hours required. LEC
View current sections...
A study of significant themes, topics, or problems in the humanities. May also relate an issue in the humanities to the social sciences or natural sciences. May be repeated for credit when the topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
An exploration of major social, political and economic developments post World War II including the rise of the European Union, the integration of Eastern and Western Europe, the growing role of Islam, attitudes towards the United States, and Europe's role in the world economy. Topics may vary based on current events. LEC
View current sections...
The objective of this course is to provide members of the university community with information that enables them to judge the humanistic, moral, and ethical implications of scientific and technological developments. Formal presentations by guest lecturers, followed by question-and-answer periods, will alternate with panel discussions, symposia, etc., prepared by faculty members drawn from the various departments, schools, and organizational units of K.U. LEC
View current sections...
‹ First  < 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 > 

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.