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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

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Introduction to German business practices, including basic information about German economic and corporate life. Especially designed for students intending to participate in an internship with a German company and those who wish to enhance their knowledge of basic business German. Taught in German. Not open to native speakers of German. Prerequisite: One 300-level German course. LEC
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The appreciation and understanding of selected masterpieces of German poetry, with attention to the basic poetic forms, techniques, and phonological features. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the classical period. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the nineteenth century. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the twentieth century. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A study of the development of German culture with emphasis on life, customs, geography, art, music, and literature, from its beginnings to 1810. Readings and discussions in German and English. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A study of the development of German culture with emphasis on life, customs, geography, art, music, and literature, from 1810 to the present. Readings and discussions in German and English. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A study of the development and distribution of the Germanic languages, with emphasis on the modern linguistic features of the major members of the language family. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works of the medieval and early modern periods. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works by a major author (e.g., Goethe, Heine, Fontane, Brecht, Kafka, Grass, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German of selected literary works on a particular topic or theme (e.g., nature, women, art and literature, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German in an area of specialized language or linguistic study (e.g., lexical fields, modern German dialects, etc.). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Readings and discussions in German on some aspect of German culture or folklore, including Landeskunde (study of contemporary Germany). May be repeated. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416, and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Practical exercises in the systematic study of idioms and synonyms, designed to foster a more discriminating and effective usage of German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Exercises in the translation of expository and stylistically sophisticated texts from various fields. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Recommended for students intending to teach German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Training in writing reports and seminar papers in German. Recommended for students intending to do graduate work in German. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student is required. Prerequisite: Two literature courses from GERM 400, GERM 408, and GERM 416 and two composition courses from GERM 340, GERM 344, and GERM 348, or equivalent. LEC
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A summer course designed principally for secondary school language teachers. Provides an orientation to proficiency-based models in foreign language instruction, national standards in the rating of foreign language proficiency, and curriculum development sessions which address issues of articulation in foreign language curricula. (Not applicable toward a major or graduate degree in German.) (Same as FREN 681 and SPAN 681.) LEC
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Introduction to methods of literary research and presentation of seminar papers. Exercises in the use of basic guides to the study of German language and literature, in the documentation of scholarly research, and in the writing of interpretive essays, based on reading and discussion of selected works from different periods of the departmental "Basic Reading List." LEC
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Differentiation of critical methods. Exercises in textual criticism. LEC
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Stylistic analysis of literary texts; writing in German. LEC
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A systematic study of German phonetics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Discussion of policies in the M.A. program, examinations, thesis proposals, writing of theses, grant proposals, conference presentations, publications of scholarship, and entrance into the academic job market. Required of all M.A. students in the first year in the program. Does not count toward completion of 30 hours of course work for the M.A. RSH
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A comprehensive introduction to the basic concepts of German philology and various aspects of historical linguistics, including the nature of language and linguistic change, discoveries of the pioneer philologists of the 19th century regarding the prehistory of German, and the beginnings of a national German language. LEC
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A descriptive study of the phonetics/phonology and grammar of contemporary standard German. Special emphasis on problems of teaching German to English-speaking students. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in German literature. May be repeated. Offered only in conjunction with GERM 616 when taught by a Max Kade Distinguished Visiting Professor. Graduate students will be assigned additional work. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in German language and linguistics. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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The elements of Middle High German as required for reading medieval texts in the original. Intensive reading and literary study of at least one text in full. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works of the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Reading and discussion of major literary works in the period; combined with lectures and background readings on literary, cultural, and political history. LEC
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Intensive study of a selected topic in German culture. May be repeated. LEC
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To be taken only in exceptional cases. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. RSH
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Introduction to selected aspects of second-language acquisition, foreign-language pedagogy, and contrastive grammar, with the major concentration on practical guidance in teaching elementary German, in test preparation and grading, and in the use of equipment. LEC
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Discussion of matters relating to the teaching of German in specific courses. Required of all GTAs in each semester of teaching, unless enrolled in GERM 800. Does not count toward completion of 30 hours of course work for the M.A. or 27 hours of course work for the Ph.D. IND
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Text-oriented study of the literature of 750-1500 with selected readings in the original and in translation. Prerequisite: GERM 721. LEC
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Reading and literary analysis of one of the following: Nibelungenlied, Erec and Iwein, Tristan, Parzival. Prerequisite: GERM 721. LEC
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Reading and literary analysis of one of the following: Minnesangs Fruehling, Walther von der Vogelweide. Prerequisite: GERM 721. LEC
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Topics to be announced. Emphasis on studies in etymology, semantics, vocabulary, medieval dialects, linguistic theories. Prerequisite: GERM 711. LEC
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Prerequisite: GERM 701. LEC
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In-depth study of the work of a major author in German literature. Prerequisite: GERM 701. LEC
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Introduction to theories and topics in German applied linguistics. SEM
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Introduction to modern German dialects, methods of dialect research and aspects of linguistic assimilation and loss as well as a survey of German-American dialects. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required. SEM
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May not be repeated. THE
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Discussion of policies in the Ph.D. program, research specializations, examinations, dissertation proposals, writing of dissertations, grant proposals, conference presentations, publication of scholarship, and entrance into the academic job market. Required of all Ph.D. students in the first year in the program. Does not count toward completion of 27 hours of course work for the Ph.D. LEC
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Reading of selected Gothic texts. Historical and descriptive study of Gothic phonology and grammar, with an introduction to comparative Germanic grammar. Prerequisite: GERM 711. LEC
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Introduction to the elements of its grammar and discussion of its role in the Germanic family of languages. Selected readings from the Heliand and discussion of the entire work. Prerequisite: GERM 711. LEC
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Reading and discussion of selected prose texts and poetic documents; phonological and grammatical features of the Old High German dialects. Prerequisite: GERM 711. LEC
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A survey of the earliest Germanic languages with an emphasis on the comparative phonology and grammar of Gothic, Old High German, and Old Saxon as well as the reading of selections of major texts in those three language. LEC
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To be taken only in exceptional cases. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. RSH
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An introduction to the study of Indigenous peoples. It surveys the concepts, methods, and content relevant to Applied Indigenous Studies, using case studies drawn from diverse cultures. The course illustrates that the social, political, religious, and economic aspects of American Indian life are interconnected and that tribal histories cannot be understood without an awareness of these fields. Students are introduced to controversies over how to research, write, and interpret American Indians, and will address the foundations of Indigenous Studies, and that is Indigenous concepts of decolonization, empowerment and Nation-building. The course explores how the lives of Indigenous people have been affected by colonization, while exploring the varying definitions of "colonialism", "colonizer" and the "colonized." LEC
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A survey of contemporary world indigenous literatures that includes those from North America, Australia, New Zealand, the South Pacific, the Arctic, and Latin America. Texts are in English (original or translation). Genres studied include the novel, poetry, and drama, supplemented by works from the oral tradition, the visual arts, and film. (Same as ENGL 305.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-Sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
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A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Not open to students who have completed GINS 331. (Same as REL 330.) LEC
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A survey of religious traditions among selected Native American peoples. Topics include religious freedom, ritual activity, cultural narrative ("myth"), kinship, healing practices, ecology, government relations, impact of colonization, impact of missionization, contact between cultures, and secularization. Open only to students in the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. Not open to students who have completed GINS 330. (Same as REL 331.) LEC
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This course concentrates on selected problems in the interdisciplinary field of Indigenous Nations Studies. Courses in this field utilize methods developed in various disciplines in order to examine issues related to the survival, self-sufficiency, mutual support, empowerment, and decolonization of Indigenous Peoples throughout the world. May be repeated for credit when the topic differs. Recommended for juniors or seniors, or for students who have completed GINS 101/INS 101. LEC
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Examines the roles of activist Indigenous women in politics, social work, academia, business, environmental and health issues. Compares and contrasts the ideology of the predominantly white feminist movement with the goals and concerns of the "Red Power" movement and emphasizes Indigenous socio-cultural values and concerns. Profiles prominent Indigenous female activists, tribal leaders and writers, in addition to topics of serious concern to Indigenous women: violence, racism, loss of culture and language, education, health care and other manifestations of continued colonization. LEC
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This course investigates the historic diets of Indigenous peoples, including cultivation of crops, hunting and fishing methods, food preparation and seed preservation. The class traces through history the colonial policies and ideologies that caused the cultures to alter their ways of eating, resulting in unprecedented modern health problems and offers traditional cultural strategies for health recovery. LEC
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An introduction to the social science methods of investigation and analysis that are used in Indigenous Nations Studies as a discipline. The nature of Indigenous Nations Studies data sources and methods of data collection, the logic of social scientific inquiry, and key methods of data analysis are emphasized. In addition, the social and educational implications of the results are examined. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of external economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law are used. (Same as GEOG 601.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills are emphasized. Guest lectures from GINS faculty members, librarian, and members of the Writing Center serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Trains students in the skills of grant writing, leadership, conflict resolution, public presentation, organization and program development as applicable to Indigenous peoples. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. LEC
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An interdisciplinary examination of the effects of historical and contemporary forms of colonialism and postcolonial strategies of resistance practiced by Indigenous peoples within and beyond the borders of the United States. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Explores the theories and methods of selected cultural, environmental, legal, political, and socio-economical issues confronting Indigenous societies throughout the world. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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With the decolonizing potential of Indigenous literary and cultural productions, this course seeks to both answer and explore such questions as: How can literary and cultural texts such as novels, poetry, music, and film from world Indigenous communities function as decolonizing tools? Can decolonizing methodologies be applied to such texts? How do such texts contribute to and strengthen Indigenous political, intellectual, cultural, visual and rhetorical sovereignty? Includes an overview of Indigenous literature, films and documentaries from North America, the Pacific, Australia, and New Zealand. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Explores the health status, beliefs, and behaviors of particular Indigenous cultures. Examines the role of internal and external influences on health, various mainstream and Indigenous models of health behavior, perceptions of illness and curing, health status, and healing practices. Focuses on the groups of the Maori of New Zealand, First Nations in Canada, Palestinian peoples in the Middle East, American Indians, and Indigenous Australians. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the impact of environmental justice and security in Indigenous communities throughout the world with a focus on tactics and strategies that incorporate Indigenous perspectives in responses and mitigation schemes. A survey of mining, dumping, and storage of toxic and radioactive waste activities as related to Indigenous peoples. Case study analyses of economic, military and mining interests contrasted with perspectives emerging from cultural traditions and beliefs of Indigenous peoples and communities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is an introduction to the social science methods of investigation and analysis that are used in Indigenous Nations Studies as a discipline. The nature of Indigenous Nations Studies data sources and methods of data collection, the logic of social scientific inquiry, and key methods of data analysis are emphasized. In addition, the social and educational implications of the results are examined. LEC
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A survey of the varied responses of global Indigenous peoples as a result of the imposition of externally-dominated economic and political systems. An overview of diverse, thematic issues such as land rights, economic development, resources and cultural patrimony, languages, knowledge systems, and women's rights from the perspectives of Indigenous societies around the world. Detailed studies of Indigenous peoples seeking recognition and protection under international law will be used. The course is offered at the 600 and 800 levels, with additional assignments at the 800 level. (Same as GEOG 801.) LEC
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An Indigenous focus of the foundation and impact of colonization, decolonization, empowerment and nation-building. LEC
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The goal of this course is two-fold: to introduce students to the academic discipline of Indigenous Nations Studies, its debates and contours, history, methods, and resources; and to develop the skills necessary to proceed successfully through the program. Unpacking key words and terms, critical thinking/reading/and writing skills, and research skills will be emphasized. Guest lectures will serve to complement and broaden assignments and discussions LEC
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Designed to fulfill program needs of the Indigenous Nations Studies master's program, this course may meet with appropriate professional or graduate courses. Can be repeated for credit when topic differs. LEC
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Students will analyze the qualities of American Indian leadership and will examine circumstances and backgrounds of Indian leaders as heroes and role models paying particular attention to how they responded as individuals, leaders, and as community members of their tribes. Besides surveying noted Indian leaders in treaty negotiations, allotment, removal, war, etc., the course will examine leaders in medicine, education, and recent American Indian history including attention to women leaders. Students will learn about the leaders' tribes and cultures in addition to understanding the ethnohistory of Indian-white relations. LEC
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An individual readings course with a qualified instructor on a topic in Indigenous Nations Studies. LEC
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Internships provide students the opportunity to obtain training and perform professional duties for academic credit at pre-approved indigenous-related agencies, organizations, and communities. Students are required to demonstrate a minimum of 60 contact hours for each one credit hour. To enroll, students must obtain the consent of a GINS faculty member and the Program's Curriculum Committee. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: permission from instructor. FLD
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This course examines gender and sexuality among indigenous communities in the world. Ethnographies about indigenous women are used to explore a variety of gender and sexual identities. Gendered and sexualized identities are analyzed within broader societal contexts such as the division of labor, kinship, marriage household, and the control of resources. Power relationships are examined between sub-altern women and the larger society, nation and globalizing world in which they play a part. LEC
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An examination of the roles and ideologies of prominent Indigenous female activists, tribal leaders and writers. LEC
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A preparation to train students in the skills of grant writing, leadership, conflict resolution, public presentation, organization and program development as applicable to Indigenous peoples. LEC
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An interdisciplinary examination of the effects of historical and contemporary forms of colonialism and postcolonial strategies of resistance practiced by Indigenous peoples within and beyond the borders of the United States. LEC
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This course explores the theories and methods of selected cultural, environmental, legal, political, and socio-economical issues confronting Indigenous societies throughout the world. LEC
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