All schools & programs >

College of Liberal Arts and Sciences

Visit their website » Print...

Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Liberal Arts & Sciences courses

Show courses in CLAS with a course number to
worth in .

There are 4,497 results.

A broad view of major works and authors in a particular period, genre, or mode. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Practical experience in the use of technical-writing or editing skills in supervised professional settings for which the student normally does not receive pay. A 1-3 hour internship requires 40-120 hours of documented on-site work in one semester (40 hours per credit). Credit hours are graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis, according to a written recommendation from the student's workplace manager, student work logs and self-evaluation, and an oral report. Prerequisite: Advanced Technical Writing I (English 562) and permission of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Directed reading and participation in small discussion groups, each formed to consider a specific and limited subject during the semester. Written work will be required, and will be judged on both content and form. The course is part of a departmental program leading to Honors in English. Prerequisite: Admission must be approved by the departmental director of undergraduate studies. LEC
View current sections...
Independent study, culminating in a substantial essay prepared under the direction of a member of the Department of English who is a specialist in the area of the student's interest. Prerequisite: Admission must be approved by the departmental director of undergraduate studies. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the literature of medieval England (in translation). Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A broad view of literary works written between 1485 and 1660. Surveys may be offered with focus on a particular genre (poetry, drama, or prose), historical period (16th- or 17th-century literature), or group of authors (women writers). May be repeated for credit as topic varies. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A close reading of Paradise Lost, Paradise Regained, Samson Agonistes, and the minor poems, with illustrative selections of prose. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Study of literary works from the Restoration and eighteenth century. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the Freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Study of literary works from the British Romantic period. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
Study of literary works from the British Romantic period. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
An advanced study of a topic, genre, or area of written and/or oral African literature. Emphasis is placed on the critical analysis of major works, as well as their cultural and historical contexts. The course also addresses central critical and theoretical debates in the field. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A study of a major topic of concern to English literature. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the major writings of literary criticism, in their historical context, from Plato and Aristotle to Samuel Johnson. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to modern criticism, in its historical context, from Wordsworth and Coleridge to the present. The emphasis will be on major critics and predominant schools. LEC
View current sections...
Study of a topic (such as mimesis, influence, deconstruction) that is important in critical theory. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
A study of the grammatical features of the earliest form of written English, with readings in Old English prose and poetry. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: An introductory course in Old English. LEC
View current sections...
Reading of selected works in Middle English (exclusive of the works of Chaucer). LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of either the Canterbury Tales or Troilus and Criseyde and the earlier poems. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of six hours. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of selected plays. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of texts written between 1485 and 1800. The course may be organized around a particular genre (poetry, prose, drama), historical period (e.g. Elizabethan literature), a major author (e.g. Milton), group of authors (e.g. women writers), or theme (e.g. literature and politics 1660-1800). Students will be expected to read and apply relevant criticism and theory as well as study primary texts. May be repeated for credit as topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of British literary works of the 1800s. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
View current sections...
Practice in the writing of fiction under the direction of a member of the department working in conjunction with one or more writers in residence. Membership is limited to students who submit, well in advance enrollment, manuscripts showing unusual ability. May be repeated for credit. LEC
View current sections...
Practice in the writing of poetry under the direction of a member of the department working in conjunction with one or more writers in residence. Membership is limited to students who submit, well in advance of enrollment, manuscripts showing unusual ability. May be repeated for credit. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive course in writing prose fiction and/or verse. Criticism (NEW) of manuscripts through group meetings and individual conferences with the instructor. Membership limited to students who submit manuscripts showing special ability in at least one of the creative writing forms. May be repeated for credit. LEC
View current sections...
A study of literary works belonging to a particular genre or to multiple genres (fiction, nonfiction, poetry, drama etc), either in a particular form (short story, essay, sonnet, etc.), concerned with a particular topic, or illustrative of a particular element of craft (voice, point of view, character development, etc. ). Intended primarily for creative- writing students with an interest in developing their skills at reading as writers. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of British literary works written during the 20th century. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of topics in modern Irish literature. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
View current sections...
Reading of selected works in modern and contemporary drama. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
View current sections...
This course focuses on or surveys individual writers in the tradition of life writing; or intensively examines topics such as "Autobiography," "Memoir and Diary," "Biography," "Slave Narrative," "Letters," "Personal Essays," or "Autobiographical Fictions." Special emphasis within a topic, such as period, gender, or ethnicity, are possible. May be repeated for credit up to a maximum of six hours. LEC
View current sections...
An intensive study of the literatures of Africa and/or African diaspora (people of African descent dispersed around the world). This study will focus on the major characteristics of a particular period, genre, mode, and/or theme in literatures such as African, Caribbean, Afro-Brazilian, African American, African Canadian, Black British. Critical theories pertinent to writers and their work will be covered. Topics may include studies in drama, poetry, or the novel; migration narratives; literature of a particular era, such as the Harlem Renaissance, Negritude, or the Black Arts Movement; representations of gender, etc. As topics vary by semester, the course may be repeated for credit. (Same as AAAS 774.) LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of North American literary works before 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
View current sections...
Intensive study of North American literary works after 1900. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. LEC
View current sections...
A colloquium for graduate students, sampling the range of poetries and poetics produced in the United States in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. LEC
View current sections...
This course surveys the field of composition studies, examining major issues and theories in the study of writing. The course may include theories from classical to contemporary rhetoric, composition theory from the twentieth century, and the most current debates in the study of writing. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of selected critical theories and of the applicability of those theories to the teaching of literature. LEC
View current sections...
Historical study of the phonology, morphology, syntax, vocabulary, and semantics of English; the relation between linguistic and cultural change. LEC
View current sections...
A study of contemporary English: phonology, morphology, syntax, and usage. The emphasis is structural, but "traditional" grammar is referred to for contrast, example, and clarification. LEC
View current sections...
Examination of a significant topic in literature or the English language. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
Acquaintance with resources and practice in techniques that are essential to other graduate courses. Major concerns include the writing and documentation of scholarly papers; basic reference and bibliographical aids; critical approaches to literature and literary historiography; and the place of language and rhetoric in English studies today. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of major concepts and issues in the study of writing, especially as applied to teaching composition. Practices in writing pedagogy are also discussed, and students' teaching of composition is observed and explored. Required of and enrollment limited to new teachers of English 101. May not be repeated for credit toward graduate degree. FLD
View current sections...
A course concerned primarily with the pedagogy of literature and writing about literature. Includes weekly group meetings, individual conferences, and class visitations. Required of and enrollment limited to new teachers of English 102. May not be repeated for credit toward graduate degree. Course graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. FLD
View current sections...
A course for graduate teaching assistants pursuing the M.F.A. or Ph.D. with emphasis in Creative Writing. Normally taken in the third year. Concerns primarily the pedagogy of creative writing: workshop techniques, approaches to conferencing, revision strategies, and the like. Includes weekly group meetings as well as class visitations and individual conferences. May not be repeated for credit towards graduate degree. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ENGL 801 and 802. FLD
View current sections...
Examination of selected topics in composition and rhetoric, such as literary studies, genre theory, dialogism, or writing across the curriculum. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. Prerequisite: ENGL 780 or equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
This course explores theories motivating writing center administration and practice. Students will investigate the multiple functions of writing centers, from writing labs associated with college composition instruction, to decentralized resources for writing faculty teaching writing across the disciplines, to elementary, secondary, and community support centers for writers, to online administrative perspective, design a research study and propose actions such as creating policy, developing curricula, designing materials, or conducting assessments. (Same as LA&S 700.) Prerequisite: LA&S 400, ENGL 400, or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
Practical experience under professional supervision in editing, theatrical production, and other activities relevant to the completion of an advanced degree in English. FLD
View current sections...
An independent reading course for students preparing to take the M.A. examination and not otherwise enrolled in the semester of the examination. Does not count in the thirty hours required for the M.A. degree. The grade in the course will be a S or U, as determined by performance on the examination. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. RSH
View current sections...
Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
View current sections...
Intensive study of one or more theoretical aspects of composition in English (e.g., rhetoric, text grammar, stylistics). Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Close study of the English language in a particular period. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Close study of one or more major critics, of a major critical school, or of a topic important in literary criticism. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Study may center on either Old or Middle English language and literature. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Close study of one or two major authors or of a group of related works. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
One or two authors are read closely, or a group of related works is studied. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Concentrated study of one or two major figures, or a group of significant writers, or an aspect of the literary scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Concentrated study of one or two authors, or a group of significant writers, or an aspect of the literary scene. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Concentrated study of one or two authors or of historical periods or important movements. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced study in a topic related to literature, language, and cultures of Africa and the African Diaspora, such as a concentrated study of one or two authors, a group of significant writers, an historical period or important movement, or an aspect of the literary or cultural scene of Black writing. May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
Advanced study in a topic related to literature, language, theory, or a special skill such as analytical bibliography or editing. Prerequisite: ENGL 800. LEC
View current sections...
An independent reading course for students preparing to take the Ph.D. comprehensive examination. May normally be taken in the semester or summer session immediately preceding the semester in which the comprehensive examination is taken. Does not count toward the residence requirement. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of the Director of Graduate Studies. RSH
View current sections...
Individual work in (a) language, (b) literature, (c) composition, or (d) the teaching of English, by properly qualified graduate students under the direction of appropriate members of the Graduate Faculty as assigned by the Graduate Director. Limited to 6 hours of credit toward the M.A. or Ph.D. degree; only on three-hour enrollment may substitute for a formal course in satisfying a field distribution requirement. Normally offered for only up to three credit hours in any one enrollment. Permission of the supervising faculty member and of the Graduate Director required for enrollment. RSH
View current sections...
Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. THE
View current sections...
This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the 100-level (Freshman/Sophomore level). course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
The course provides historical, cultural, and political overviews of Europe since 1945 with particular emphasis on the contribution of French and Italian culture and society. The course emphasizes Europe's contribution to Western intellectual thought, social movements, arts and literature, and global society. (Same as HWC 302.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of the changing nature of warfare and the struggle to bring about peace. Topics include pacifism, the "military revolution" that created the first professional armies; the development of diplomatic immunity, truces, and international law; the peace settlements of Westphalia, Utrecht, Vienna, Versailles, San Francisco; the creation of peace movements and peace prizes; the evolution of total war, civil war; and guerrilla warfare involving civilians in the twentieth century; the history of the League of Nations and United Nations; and the rise of intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations. (Same as HIST 329 and PCS 329.) LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed for the study of special topics in European Studies at the Junior/Senior level. course work must be arranged through the KU Office of Study Abroad and approved by a faculty adviser in European Studies. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
View current sections...
This course will be a team-taught interdisciplinary overview of issues related to business in Western Europe. Directed primarily at sophomores and juniors, the course will be open to both business and non-business majors. This course may be taken concurrently with language or area studies courses and is designed to reinforce the linkages between language, area studies, and international business. (Same as IBUS 305.) Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. LEC
View current sections...
An introduction to the literature of encounter between European and non-European civilizations, drawing on both Western and non-Western sources. The course may include European interactions with areas such as the Mediterranean Basin, Sub-saharan Africa, South and East Asia, and the Americas. World areas and historical periods chosen for study will vary from semester to semester according to the interest and field of the instructor. Not open to freshmen. (Same as HWC 430.) Prerequisite: HWC 114 or HWC 204 and HWC 115 or HWC 205. LEC
View current sections...
Investigation of Muslim migration into Europe and day-to-day interactions of Muslims with other European populations. This is an integrated study of historical, political, religious and economic influences that determine Muslim experience in contemporary European culture. (Same as HWC 435.) LEC
View current sections...
Provides an interdisciplinary approach to the study of modern European civilization. By discussing both classic and contemporary, controversial readings each week and writing several papers during the semester, students acquire an understanding of the development of modern European culture and society and Europe's contemporary problems. Topics for discussions and papers are drawn from the following subjects: the economic and political integration of European states; modernism and anti-modernism in European culture; imperialism, migration, and ethnic and racial division in European society; democracy versus dictatorship; American-European relations; mass culture, urban development, and the welfare state; and contrasts and comparisons between European Cultures--East and West, North and South. Seminar discussions are led by invited European Studies faculty as well as the instructor or instructors. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. LEC
View current sections...
European Studies majors will do research and write a substantial paper on a topic in the culture, economy, history, or politics of Europe. Topics will be approved by the European Studies Committee. Students will work with an adviser chosen from among the European Studies faculty and with the European Studies Coordinator. The majority of the students' work will be done independently with their advisers, but students will meet with the European Studies Coordinator several times as a class to report on their progress and present their final drafts. Required of all European Studies majors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500 and 15 hours toward the Co-Major. IND
View current sections...
Open to European Studies majors doing their senior thesis for Honors. Prerequisite: Completion of EURS 500, 15 hours toward the Co-Major, and approval of Honors thesis by European Studies Committee. Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EURS 501. IND
View current sections...
This intensive, interdisciplinary seminar focuses on current social, political, and economic changes in Europe. Topics include European integration and the European Union, the conflict between nationalism and European consciousness, NATO and U.S.-European relations, and international business in Europe. The seminar will include guest lectures from an international array of scholars, political officials, and business representatives, as well as site visits to their institutions and companies. The seminar takes place in Brussels, Belgium, and enrollment is restricted to students accepted in the KU Summer Institute for European Studies study abroad program. LEC
View current sections...
A multidisciplinary study of selected literary, scholarly, and creative works produced by those Europeans forced into exile, emphasizing their impact on culture and society both in Europe and in those countries in which the exiles resided. Examples: exile during the Nazi dictatorship in Germany (1933-1945), during Cold War crises (Berlin 1960, Prague 1968). LEC
View current sections...
An interdisciplinary overview of the Cold War period (1945-1985) focusing on Western European dimensions of the problem, based on the view that the Cold War structured political institutions, cultures, and societies in enduring ways that continue to be relevant today. LEC
View current sections...
This course allows students in the European Studies Co-Major and related disciplines to receive credit for research related to European Collections in one or more of the following institutions: Watson and Spencer Research Libraries, the Dole Institute, the Eisenhower and Truman Presidential Libraries, the U.S. Army Combined Arms Research and Foreign Military Studies Office at Fort Leavenworth, the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City, and the Winston Churchill Collection at the Westminster College Library in Fulton, Missouri. May be taken in place of EURS 501 by European Studies Honors Students if taken for three credit hours. Permission of instructor necessary. IND
View current sections...
Artists and intellectuals in their relation to state and society. This course is designed to introduce students (1) to the role European artists and intellectuals have often played in the arena of politics and (2) to the privileged place cultural production (arts, literature, media) occupies in the formation of various European identities and economies. LEC
View current sections...
Social, historical, and economic study of Southern European societies with emphasis on modern period. Relevant to the study of European integration and EU enlargement. Consideration of the distinctive southern Mediterranean societies from the perspective of their collective identity as a regional economic and geopolitical bloc. LEC
View current sections...
This course is designed to impart a general knowledge of life in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden with emphasis on social and cultural conditions, against a geographical and historical background, from the Viking Age to the present. Slides and other illustrated materials. (Same as SCAN 570.) LEC
View current sections...
A study of significant themes, movements, or problems in European history, literature, politics, society, or culture. May also relate European issues to issues in other world areas (Africa, North America, Asia, etc.) May be repeated for credit when topic varies. LEC
View current sections...
Study of topics in Irish literature and culture. Topics may focus on a particular genre, theme, historical period, or group of authors. May be repeated for credit as the topic changes. (Same as ENGL 530.) Prerequisite: Prior completion of the freshman-sophomore English requirement or its equivalent. LEC
View current sections...
A survey of the economies of the European Union, with a focus on the economic development of the member states since World War II, and an examination of the various economic issues confronting them today. (Same as ECON 536) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 144. LEC
View current sections...
A study of influential proposals for world peace from Erasmus' The Complaint of Peace (1516) to the 1995 Hague Appeal for World Peace. Selected writings by such authors as Erasmus, Hugo Grotius, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Immanuel Kant, Henry Thoreau, Henri Dunant, Berthe von Suttner, Woodrow Wilson, Mahatma Gandhi, and Martin Luther King, Jr., are considered. (Same as PCS 550.) Prerequisite: HWC 204 or HWC 205. LEC
View current sections...
Examines in literature, art, and film from about 1800 to the present, both sides of the ongoing debate surrounding the idea that all human persons possess inalienable rights because all persons possess intrinsic value as persons, value independent of race, gender, caste or class, wealth, age, sexual preference, etc. Anti- and pro-rights proponents are paired and studied with equal care. (Same as PCS 565.) LEC
View current sections...
Independent study and directed reading on special topics. Permission of the instructor who will supervise the student's work is required. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The 1 credit hour course represents a foreign language discussion section to be attached to a major 3-credit hour EURS course (example: EURS 500). Foreign language discussion sections are an integral part of the KULAC program envisaged to reinforce foreign language proficiency. LEC
View current sections...
The European Union, the union of 27 European countries, is a culmination of a long history of European unity. The European Union now encompasses population and economic strength rivalling that of the United States. This course examines selected topics in the history of European integration and the political, legal, economic, and social implications of the present European Union as well as its relations with the United States and other regions of the world. LEC
View current sections...
Nature is our oldest home and newest challenge. This course surveys the environmental history of the earth from the extinction of the dinosaurs to the present with a focus on the changing ecological role of humans. It analyzes cases of ecological stability, compares cultural attitudes toward nature, and asks why this ancient relationship seems so troubled. (Same as HIST 103.) LEC
View current sections...
This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory (EVRN 141) survey the foundations of environmental understanding and the process of scientific discovery from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics will include the history of environmental systems and life on earth, the discovery of biotic evolution, ecological change, and climate change. To be taken with EVRN 141. (Same as GEOG 140 and HIST 140.) LEC
View current sections...
This laboratory applies the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to earth systems and the development of environmental understanding using historical and present-day examples. To be taken with EVRN 140. (Same as GEOG 141 and HIST 141.) LAB
View current sections...
This interdisciplinary course and its laboratory (EVRN 143) survey the history of humanity's relationship with the natural world over the long term from perspectives that combine the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences. Key topics will include the evolution of Homo sapiens and cultural systems; the development of hunter, gatherer, fisher, agricultural, and pastoral lifeways; the ecology of colonialism and industrial civilization, and the emergence of ideological and ethical perspectives on the relationship between nature and culture. To be taken with EVRN 143. (Same as GEOG 142 and HIST 142.) LEC
View current sections...
This laboratory applies the principles and methodologies of the humanities, physical, life and social sciences to the humanity's engagement with the global environment using historical and present-day examples. To be taken with EVRN 142. (Same as GEOG 143 and HIST 143) LAB
View current sections...
This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. (Same as GEOG 148.) LEC
View current sections...
This course presents an overview of our understanding of environmental processes and issues. Topics include scientific principles, resource issues, pollution and global change, among others. This course gives students a rigorous understanding of interactions between humans and their environment and provides students with a scientific basis for making informed environmental decisions. An honors section of EVRN 148, designed for superior students. (Same as GEOG 149.) Prerequisite: Membership in the University Honors Program or approval of instructor required. LEC
View current sections...
 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 >  Last ›

The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.