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Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies Program

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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

View all approved principal course distribution courses »

Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

View all approved non-Western culture courses »

Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies courses

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A multidisciplinary introduction to the former communist states of Russia, the western Newly Independent States, Central Europe, and the Balkans. The course addresses the geography and history of the region, as well as the cultures of its peoples, as presented in literature, film, and music. Special attention is devoted to the current political, economic, and social situations, as they are reflected by the transition from communism and the rise of nationalism. LEC
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A multidisciplinary introduction to the former communist states of Russia, the western Newly Independent States, Central Europe, and the Balkans. The course addresses the geography and history of the region, as well as the cultures of its peoples, as presented in literature, film, and music. Special attention is devoted to the current political, economic, and social situations, as they are affected by the transition from communism and the rise of nationalism. Prerequisite: Open only to students in the University Honors Program, or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A broad, survey-type course that examines all the former Soviet republics-Ukraine, Belarus, Moldova, Lithuania, Latvia, Estonia, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan-with additional coverage of neighboring regions. The course addresses the history of the region, literature, culture, geography, religion, and the building of post-Soviet states and societies. LEC
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Examines the unique cultures and societies of the Eurasian region (Georgia, Azerbaijan, Armenia, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Turkmenistan, Tajikistan and to a lesser degree, Russia, Mongolia and Afghanistan). For the better part of the 20th Century, this distinct region of the world was hidden beneath the communist veneer of the Soviet Union. With the collapse of the USSR, the countries of this region are returning to their historic roots, and this course introduces students to the history, politics, economics, literature and general culture of these countries. Open only to students admitted to the University Honors Program or by permission of instructor. LEC
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Interdisciplinary examination of topics involving two or more of the cooperating disciplines in Russian and East European studies. LEC
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Lectures, readings, oral discussion, and written analyses of selected major works of Russian writing and other modes of creative expression and discourse that treat the subject of war and peace, such as imaginative literature, works of history, memoirs, cinema, music, and painting. Reading examples are The Song of Igor's Campaign, Alexander Pushkin's The Captain's Daughter and A History of Pugachev, Leo Tolstoy's War and Peace, Nadezhda Durova's The Notes of a Girl-Cavalryman, Boris Pasternak's Doctor Zhivago, and George Kennan's Russia Leaves the War. Not open to students who have taken REES 685. LEC
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Development of interdisciplinary research skills and familiarity with resources and issues in the study of Russian, East European, and Eurasian Studies. Preparation for REES 496. LEC
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Interdisciplinary original research conducted using at least one REES language and resulting in a research paper. Prerequisite: REES 492. LEC
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An intensive, multidisciplinary survey of Central Asia, focusing on the former Soviet republics-Kazakhstan, Krygyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan-with additional coverage of neighboring regions (the Caucasus and the Caspian basin, Afghanistan, and western China). The course addresses the history of the region (from the Silk Road to Soviet rule), geography, religion, and the building of post-Soviet states and societies. LEC
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An interdisciplinary course examining the development of Siberia from its beginnings to the present day. Topics to be covered are selected from the following list: topography and natural resources; conquest and exploitation by Russian and other European settlers; Siberia's role as a place of imprisonment and exile; the development of towns and transportation systems; Siberian historiography; Siberian Russian literature; and Siberia's place in Russia's economy and national defense. LEC
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An interdisciplinary course examining the terrain, peoples, and cultures of the vast expanse in northern Asia known as Siberia. Areas of inquiry include geology, archeology, ethnography, religions, folk culture, the arts, science and education, politics, and environmental problems. With an emphasis on the natural and social sciences, and exploration of the relationship between Siberia and its neighbors in all directions, including the United States (Alaska, "Russian America"), this course can be taken without duplication by students who have already taken REES 512 (or SLAV 512) Siberia Yesterday and Today. LEC
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Examines the central role the Russian military has played in its country's politics, society, and culture in the modern period. Treats Russia's victories and defeats in war, the course highlights the continuities in Russian strategic practices and illuminates the current and future strategic policies and military developments of the contemporary Russian state. LEC
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Examines the history of relations between the governments, emerging national elites, and populations of Russia, Ukraine, Poland, and other East European countries, and the different regional perceptions and stereotypes, including the new post-Soviet states and their European neighbors. LEC
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Examines the emergence and evolution of regional ethno-cultural and national identities in Eastern Europe. Discusses the theories and definitions of ethnicity, nationality, and nationalism, and offers a practical approach to understanding nationalism's and nationalist movements in Eastern Europe. LEC
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Students undertake substantial work in the translation of non-technical writing, (e.g. poems, short stories, novels, essays, works of history, scientific treatises), from any REES language into English, and examine the practical and theoretical problems encountered in translation from the source to the target language. Prerequisite: BCRS 508, PLSH 508, RUSS 508, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course is taught in Russian. Lectures, readings, oral discussion, and written analyses of selected major works of Russian writing and other modes of creative expression and discourse that treat the subject of war and peace, such as imaginative literature, works of history, memoirs, cinema, music, and painting. Reading examples are Slovo o polku Igoreve, Pushkin's Kapitanskaia dochka and Istoriia Pugacheva, Tolstoy's Voina i mir, Evgenii Tarle's Napoleon, Pasternak's Doktor Zhivago and Andrei Petukhov's Pamiat' o sluzhbe. Not open to students who have taken REES 485. Prerequisite: 3 years of Russian at the college level. LEC
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Examination in depth of the historical, social, intellectual, and artistic development of St. Petersburg as a major urban center. LEC
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This course examines Russian Orthodoxy as a religious system and the institution of the Russian Orthodox Church from its first appearance in Russia to the present. It focuses on beliefs and practices of the clergy and laity; institutional structures; the relationships between Church and State; interactions with non-Orthodox religious communities; responses to Soviet atheist policies; Orthodox influences on political theory, philosophy, literature, and the fine arts. (Same as REL 704.) LEC
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Topics in the development of social radicalism and of philosophical positivism and materialism from Radishchev through the Russian Marxists. A reading knowledge of Russian is desirable but not required. Prerequisite: REES 723 or PHIL 580. LEC
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Interdisciplinary examination of topics involving two or more of the cooperating disciplines in Russian and East European studies. LEC
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Enrollment to fulfill Masters continuous enrollment rule. Prerequisite: Completion of all degree requirements except submission of seminar paper or comprehensive examination. RSH
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Mastery of interdisciplinary research skills, and knowledge of resources and scholarship on the study of Russian, east European, and Eurasian Studies. LEC
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Research, write, and present a professional-quality paper, involving interdisciplinary original research, consultation with REES faculty, and substantial use of sources in at least one REES language. Prerequisite: REES 898. SEM
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