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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Political Science courses

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An introduction to basic American governmental institutions, political processes, and policy. LEC
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Open only to students in the College Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the comparative study of political systems emphasizing governmental structures, parties, electoral techniques, and recent trends in the field. The course also considers major differences between (1) representative and autocratic systems, and (2) developed and underdeveloped nations. LEC
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Open only to students in the College Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of the nation-state system including the role of nationalism, sovereignty, and power. Patterns of state action including neutralism, collective security, war, and cooperation through international organizations are stressed. Specific examples of contemporary international problems are also analyzed and discussed. LEC
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Open only to students in the College Honors Program or by consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is designed for the study of special topics in Political Science at the freshman/sophomore level. Course work must be arranged through the Office of KU Study Abroad. May be repeated for credit if content varies. LEC
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An examination of the perennial issues and major concepts in political philosophy. Ideas such as community, liberty, equality, justice, and democracy will be examined in order to understand the various meanings given to these concepts in political discourse and to understand the role to these ideas in various political theories. Prerequisite: Either POLS 110 or POLS 150 or POLS 170, or their honors equivalents. LEC
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Prerequisite: Either POLS 110, POLS 150, or POLS 170, or their honors equivalents and open only to students in the College Honors Program, or by consent of instructor. LEC
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An introduction to the social science methods of investigation and analysis that are used in political science as a discipline and, in many cases, in public and private sector analytical work as well. The nature of political science data sources and methods of data collection, the logic of social scientific inquiry, and key methods of data analysis are emphasized. Prerequisite: POLS 110 and POLS 150 and POLS 170 (or their Honors equivalents), or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of issues and problems concerning government and politics in American society. This course is intended primarily for non-majors, and does not meet the junior/senior level course field distribution requirement. LEC
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Offers an introduction to the policy-making process covering policy formulation, adoption, and implementation. Overview of major theories of the policy-making process, the actors involved in the process, and the constraints and enhancements offered by the broader political environment. The theoretical frameworks are applied to several substantive policy areas. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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Introduction to administration, public policy and policy makings is the study of government workers, the organizations in which they work, how they are financed, and how government engages citizens to help form and maintain community. In various ways, the class sessions explore the three important issues of public administration: discretion, authority, and accountability. (Same as PUAD 330.) Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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Introduction to administration, public policy and policy making, for honors students, is the study of government workers, the organizations in which they work, how they are financed, and how government engages citizens to help form and maintain community. In various ways, the class sessions explore the three important issues of public administration: discretion, authority, and accountability. (Same as PUAD 331.) Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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This course will survey selected current political issues around the globe. The focus of the course will be on understanding and analyzing the wide diversity of political phenomena that mark countries around the world. Topics may include such things as elections and electoral politics; political parties; government stability; democratization; ethnic, racial, caste, or religious conflict; protest and revolutionary movements; social movements (environmental, feminist, and others); and the politics of economic reform. This course is intended primarily for non-majors, and does not meet the junior/senior level course field distribution requirement. LEC
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A survey of selected issues in current international relations. Topics include global economic interdependence, regional conflicts and nationalism, United States military and economic policy in the post-Cold War era, the role of international organizations such as the United Nations and the European community, global environmental problems and the contemporary role of international law. This course is intended primarily for non-majors and does not meet the junior/senior level course field distribution requirement. LEC
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This offering provides course credit for fieldwork in politics and policy-making that takes place outside the department's Spring Semester internship programs in Washington, D.C. and Topeka. Consent of Instructor is required prior to enrollment. FLD
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Individual and supervised readings in selected areas of political science. Course is repeatable for different areas; however, only 3 hours of directed readings can be applied to the major. Prerequisite: Six hours of political science, 2.5 overall grade-point average, and prior consent of department. IND
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Intern seminar in Washington, D.C. Students meet weekly during Washington Semester program, in speaker/seminar format. Participation is expected, and a term paper is a requirement. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD
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Intern seminar at statehouse in Topeka. Students meet weekly during this program, in speaker/seminar format. Participation is expected, and a term paper is a requirement. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD
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Supervised internships in public and private agency offices in the Washington, D.C. area. This course is open only to students who are participating in the department's organized, supervised, semester-long Washington internship program. In order to be eligible for the program, students must have junior or senior standing, an overall grade-point average of 2.75, must have completed POLS 110 and have a 3.0 grade point average in all political science courses. Course will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required prior to enrollment. FLD
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Supervised internships in public and private agency offices in the Topeka area. This course is open only to students who are participating in the department's organized, supervised, semester-long Topeka internship program. In order to be eligible for the program, students must have junior or senior standing, an overall grade point average of 2.75, must have completed POLS 110 and have a 3.0 grade-point average in all political science courses. Course will be graded satisfactory/unsatisfactory. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor is required prior to enrollment. FLD
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Political science majors who in their senior year who wish to become candidates for graduation with honors in political science must enroll in and successfully complete six hours of honors thesis work. Consent of the department is required and candidate must have minimum grade point averages of 3.5 in political science courses and 3.25 in all courses, in both in-residence and combined work. IND
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An examination of the major theoretical questions concerning citizenship and government in modern society. Major ideologies and important contemporary philosophers are examined to determine how they address such issues as the meaning of the public interest, the just distribution of power and privilege, the proper role of government in society, and legitimate methods for making collective decisions. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of major concepts and theories in political philosophy from Plato to Marx. The emphasis is on understanding major classics in western political thought. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination and analysis of the portrayal of politics and political problems in literature. Classical and modern texts will be considered, including dramas, poems, and novels. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A historical survey of millenarian movements (the belief in imminent, total, ultimate, this-worldly, collective salvation), with particular attention to their psychological, sociological, and political dimensions. (Same as REL 504.) Prerequisite: POLS 301 or honors equivalent or for non-majors completion of Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Students will be exposed to a variety of topics related to the conduct of political science research. Emphasis will be on how one discerns what is known and what remains to be discovered about a research topic, the development of theories and the hypotheses about the unknown, and the collection of information for testing theories. Students will be expected to begin independent research on a topic that might eventually culminate in an honors thesis. This seminar is intended for political science majors who are in the honors or deans programs, who hold departmental scholarships, and/or who intend to write honors theses. Prerequisite: POLS 306. IND
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Covers judicial functions, organizations, personnel, and processes. Examines the goals of the law and the operations of the legal system in meeting these objectives. Focuses on norm enforcement, conflict resolution, and judicial policy-making. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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An overview of the political position of Latinas/os in the United States. The focus is on the three largest Latino groups in the U.S.: Mexican-Americans, Cuban-Americans, and Puerto Ricans; as well as an examination of other South American and Central American populations in the U.S. The main topics include identity formation, the political circumstances of Latinos, relationship to the electoral process, political behavior, and the policy process. LEC
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Survey of the development of the American political party system, stressing party organization, nominating systems, campaigns, elections, role of mass media, and party finances. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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This course examines the construction, administration, and interpretation of public opinion polls. The course will also examine the role of public opinion in the democratic process and the formation of public opinion. LEC
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This course will focus on contemporary political communication theory and illustrate how such theories are exemplified in modern political contexts: political arguments and developing consensus, constitutional issues and hearings, the rhetorical presidency, the dissemination of political information, and political uses of definition. (Same as COMS 607.) Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC
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This course investigates the ways in which rhetorical strategies (persuasive and linguistic usage) permeate the relationship between politics and politicians and the mass media. We will analyze media coverage of political debates, the presidential use of radio, television and press conferences, and the network evening news coverage of political events to see how political decisions are influenced by and influence the media. (Same as COMS 335.) Prerequisite: COMS 130 or COMS 150. LEC
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This course provides an overview of environmental justice, both as a social movement and as a public policy initiative. Environmental justice examines the distribution of environmental externalities across different socio-economic and racial groups. We will discuss several different public policy areas that have been impacted by the environmental justice movement: hazardous waste facility siting, urban redevelopment and Brownfields, transportation policy, and Native American sovereignty. We will also touch upon international environmental policy in an environmental justice context. Throughout the course we will evaluate empirical issues in studying environmental justice. (Same as EVRN 528.) Prerequisite: POLS 306 or a statistics class or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course compares environmental politics and policies across a number of countries, including those in North America, Western Europe, East Asia, and Latin America. (Same as EVRN 553.) LEC
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This course examines struggles for freedom in southern Africa and the consequences of political, economic, and social changes in the region. The end of colonial rule, the demise of white-settler domination, and the fall of the apartheid regime is discussed. As a major political event of the twentieth century, the liberation of southern Africa had both local and global consequences. The course analyzes transnational issues of liberation and resistance to consider broader regional and international perspectives. Course themes pay particular attention to gender and ethnicity and include a focus on democratization and contemporary meanings of liberation. Prior course work in African Studies is strongly recommended, but not required. (Same as AAAS 561 and HIST 561.) LEC
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This course exposes students to contemporary research on women and politics by surveying the sub-fields of political science. Topics include women's representation in the U.S., women and U.S. public policy, gender and legal theory, international women's movements, women and revolution, and women as political elites. We will examine the ways in which feminist theory and women's activism have challenged the narrow focus of the discipline as well as redefined women's place in society. (Same as WGSS 562.) Prerequisite: A 100-level POLS course or WGSS 201 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course studies fiscal, monetarist, and trade policies to assess the usefulness and problems posed by these policy instruments across countries. This includes examining exchange rates, interest rates, budget deficit, trade deficit, and debt, to understand their composition and relevance to domestic economy, employment, investment, development, and international trade, the problems they pose, and how these may be overcome. We then examine when, how, and why government enacts these instruments across countries and regions. Prerequisite: POLS 150 or POLS 151. LEC
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An examination of the diverse forms of election rules and their consequences for political parties, politicians, and voters. The course will survey election rules in theory and practice; the design and re-design of election rules in new and established democracies; and how elections affect party strategies or governance and representation, and the types of party systems that emerge. The course will also incorporate intensive studies of election campaigns occurring during the semester that the course meets. Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC
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This course focuses on three periods of major political changes in Asia since 1945; independence from colonization; adoption of governance; and steps toward democratization. The focus on political change is to help students see that a) many countries initiate political reforms domestically; b) the ability to implement changes is correlated to ability to win support; c) the constitutional process may favor some groups over others; d) the ability to mediate political stability depends on (a), (b), and (c). Prerequisite: POLS 150 or equivalent. LEC
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Most developed countries provide for the basic needs of their citizens. Many provide health care, free education, and even retirement funding in exchange for taxes. The U.S. is an exception. The course presents taxation systems in most developed countries, then explores the dimensions of social welfare, and the differential roles of citizens in each country. The final section of the course outlines legislative and legal possibilities for U.S. citizens. Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC
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A detailed introduction to feminist thought post-1960. Examines feminism in relation to the categories of political theory: liberal feminism, socialist feminism, radical feminism, and postmodern feminism. Within these categories and separately, we will also consider feminism as it is influenced by women traditionally excluded from mainstream feminist thought, namely U.S. woman of color and women of post-colonial societies. (Same as WGSS 600.) Prerequisite: WGSS 201 or a 100-level POLS course or permission of instructor. LEC
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A systematic survey of the major political ideologies of the 19th and 20th centuries such as anarchism, socialism, liberalism, fascism, communism, and participatory democracy. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of political movements and thinkers from the Puritan period to the present that have influenced the development of contemporary political ideas. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Detailed study of the typical and perennial dilemmas that arise in theories of democratic governance with an emphasis on contemporary analytical investigations of democratic systems. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the relationship between religious faith and politics in Western political thought and theory. The approach will be both historical and philosophical, beginning with Moses on the one hand, and the Greeks on the other. Texts will include biblical, Greek philosophical, Jewish and Christian philosophical and theological writings. (Same as REL 604.) Prerequisite: POLS 301, or for non-majors completion of Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Possible authors for examination may include Homer, Hesiod, Plato, Aristotle, Cicero, and Augustine, among others. Central topics will include the problems of truth and knowledge, justice, power, human rule, and the relationship of the individual to the community. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of the instructor. LEC
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An analysis of works by various authors, with the intention of exploring the political ideas that emerge in conjunction with the appearance of modern science, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, and Romanticism. Topics will include the modern conceptions of the nature of being, truth, justice, and the relationship of the individual to the community. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the political economic approach to individual and collective choice behavior called "rational choice." The course focuses on models of voting systems and other political institutions as seen from a game theoretic perspective. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science and completion of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences mathematics requirement for the B.A. degree. LEC
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A study of selected theorists in relation to a topic in political theory. Sample topics include: revolution; authority and community; elements of political power; political elites: ideology, human nature in politics, political conflict, etc. Theorists will range from ancient to contemporary. Course is repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: POLS 301, or (for non-majors) completion of the Western Civilization requirement, or consent of instructor. LEC
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The Supreme Court viewed as a political branch of our government. Special emphasis on the Court's role in determining powers of government and their relationships. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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The constitutional limits on governmental powers are studied with special emphasis on constitutional guarantees of individuals freedom. Prerequisite: POLS 110. POLS 610 is recommended. LEC
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An examination of psychological perspectives on political phenomena. Topics include political personality, foreign policy decision making, international conflict and cooperation, voting behavior, and political participation and socialization. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 110 and POLS 170. LEC
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A systematic comparative analysis of structures, functions, and policies of state political systems. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A survey of the social, cultural, economic, and structural differences among cities and an investigation into how these factors affect urban politics and policies. Specific topics include leadership, governmental reform, citizen participation, inter-ethnic conflict, and economic development. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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This course examines the behavior of candidates, campaigns, and voters in the electoral process. Topics will include the role of media, the impact of money, the operations of political campaigns and the effect of campaign laws. LEC
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Study of internal group organization and the politics of interests within the U.S. policy-making process. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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Descriptive and comparative analysis of legislative institutions and processes in the United States, covering Congress and state legislatures. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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The office of the President of the United States, its place in the constitutional and political system. Emphasis is given to modern experience and current problems. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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A study of selected contemporary problems of policy or politics in the United States. Course is repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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Analysis and evaluation of the structures and processes involved in the formulation of public policy at all levels of government. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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An introduction to the study and analysis of public policy with emphasis on the concepts and techniques of policy thinking. The methods of policy description, explanation, evaluation, and choice will be applied to a variety of policy topics, e.g. health care, defense, environmental protection, education, etc. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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An examination of the formulation and execution of government policies in the economy and the business sector; the impact of the economy and business on government policies and the impact of government policies on the economy and business. Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An examination of the formulation and execution of key social policies in the United States, such as welfare policy, crime and drug control policy, disability rights policy, education policy, and social regulatory policy concerning controversial social issues such as abortion and gun control. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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Analysis of environmental politics and the formulation and implementation of environmental policy. Examines the history and development of environmental politics as well as current trends. Themes include interest groups, business interests, political institutions, and specific environmental policy issues. (Same as EVRN 620.) LEC
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Examines left- and right-wing extremist political groups in America and how the government has developed policies and respond to these groups. Special attention will be given to the process of policy adoption and implementation and how the government might respond to extremist groups in the future. Issues and themes will include groups such as the left-wing terrorists of the 1960s and 1970s, right-wing anticommunist groups of the 1950s and 1960s, international terrorists acting in the U.S., hate crime, ecoterrorism, citizen militia groups, and pro- and anti-abortion extremist groups. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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This course introduces the theory and methods used in survey research. The topics include types of surveys, type of sampling methods, questionnaire and codebook construction and analysis. Prerequisite: POLS 306. LEC
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This course focuses on the problems encountered while implementing surveys in specific populations (in the United States and Europe) and in developing countries. The course identifies problem areas such as in sampling and questionnaire design; and addresses how researchers overcome these problems. Prerequisite: POLS 306 and POLS 626. LEC
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This course examines the social, institutional and political context of public health policy in the United States. We will examine factors that shape the nation's public health, explore the role of government in reducing risk and promoting well being, and analyze the major institutions responsible for monitoring, protecting and promoting general public health. Themes include the social determinants of health, health disparities, emerging infectious diseases, food safety, transportation, and environmental health. (Same as EVRN 628.) Prerequisite: POLS 110 and POLS 306 are recommended. LEC
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Examination of the U.S. political system and policy formulation and administration through intensive analysis of selected current public policy problems. Sample topics include the environment, education, and economic well-being. Course is repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: POLS 110. LEC
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This seminar explores the nature of identity and how identity is relevant to politics and policy with a focus on political attitudes and behavior, institutions, and public policy. Topics include individual and group identity, identities such as gender, racial, sexual orientation, and partisan, and the enduring importance of identity for understanding politics as well as the policy process. The approach is multidisciplinary but political science perspectives are relied on more heavily. (Same as WGSS 630.) Prerequisite: POLS 110 and POLS 306 are recommended. LEC
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Examination of U.S. governmental agencies with special attention to their development and role in the American political system. Prerequisite: POLS 330. LEC
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Reproductive policy has historically been a highly politicized policy arena, which has elicited attention from the political community as well as the public. This course moves beyond the popular rhetoric associated with reproductive issues, by critically investigating the history, development, implementation and the relative success of various reproductive policies in the United States. These policies are compared to, and assessed against, policies governing similar topics in various countries. (Same as WGSS 640.) Prerequisite: POLS 110 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Examines the ethical and philosophical choices that inform public policy in democratic societies. The guiding idea of the course is that public policies reflect underlying decisions about the nature of state authority and the just use of that authority. The theoretical focus is on modern European and American liberal democratic thought; the empirical focus is global. Among the policy issues examined in the course are public education, immigration, gender equality, same-sex marriage, and drugs. Prerequisite: POLS 150 or POLS 301. LEC
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This course investigates political events and decisions that are considered illegal or illegitimate. Cases from the U.S. and around the world are considered. Issues discussed include the misuse of governmental power and funds, electoral fraud, and bribery. Conditions under which problems arise and reforms that address them are considered. Prerequisite: POLS 110 and POLS 150. LEC
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Examines the international relations, political institutions, and social politics of these two ethonational communities in relation to each other. Specific topics include the historical evolution of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, prospects for conflict resolution, electoral systems and political parties in the two nations, state-society relations, social movements, and roles of gender and religion. Prerequisite: Nine hours of Political Science, including POLS 150/POLS 151 or POLS 170/POLS 171, or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course examines the ways in which Latin American women have engaged in politics in the past two decades. Cases will draw from a variety of countries in Latin America. Students are expected to develop insights, through comparative analysis, into why women "do politics" in certain ways, the role of the State in women's politics, the (dis)advantages of various political strategies, and the ways in which political, economic, and social changes over time have affected women's political opportunities and interests. (Same as WGSS 651.) Prerequisite: Six hours of course work in Political Science and/or Women's Studies and/or Latin American Studies. LEC
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The study of the politics and government of Europe. Major countries are covered in depth, while smaller democracies are grouped according to political concepts. Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC
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This course explores ways in which militarization and warfare are gendered processes. We ask, what does war tell us about gender, and what does gender tell us about war? Though the majority of fighters are men, women are essential to war efforts. They also represent a high proportion of the casualties of war. Yet women are rarely examined in relation to war; thus we work to uncover women's experiences of war. We also look to women's contributions to the peace movement in terms of both theory and practice, asking: Is peace a feminist issue? Should feminists support women's access to combat positions or oppose the military? What if women ruled the world--would that end wars? Does militarized masculinity harm men more than benefit them? How do states mobilize citizens to war and how is the process gendered? (Same as WGSS 653.) Prerequisite: One of the following: POLS 150, POLS 151, POLS 170, POLS 171, WGSS 201, WGSS 202. LEC
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The collapse of the Soviet system and the problems of transforming a central planned authoritarian state into a free market democracy. The roles of ethnic and national tensions, economic decay, and cultural factors. Prerequisite: Eight hours in the social sciences and/or history, including POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course analyzes Communist political theory in its application to the countries of East-Central Europe with consideration of their traditional backgrounds and their patterns of political, social, and economic developments. It constructs a theoretical model of the communist state and discusses its variations by description and comparison of the governments and political processes of Albania, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, German Democratic Republic, Hungary, Poland, Rumania, and Yugoslavia. Prerequisite: POLS 150 and three hours in the social sciences or East European history, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A comparative examination of the contemporary political institutions, processes and ideas of China, Japan, and Korea. (Same as EALC 656.) Prerequisite: POLS 150 or a course in East Asian studies. LEC
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An evaluation of the traditional and contemporary political institutions, behavior and ideas of the countries of Southeast Asia. Prerequisite: POLS 150 or a course in Asian history or Southeast Asian history. LEC
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This course examines how political science can be used to explain the political dynamics of Latin America. The course will be devoted to understanding different theories about politics -- many of which have been devised by political scientists whose primary focus of study is not Latin America -- and examining their uses and limitations in understanding Latin America. Among the themes we will be examining are the relationships between economic growth, political culture, and democracy, the role of the military in politics, the political impact of new social movements (such as the women's movement and religious movements), theories of revolution, and understanding the prevalence of political corruption in the region. Along the way, we will analyze how political scientists attempt to develop hypotheses, gather data, and test theories. Prerequisite: POLS 150 or a social science course in Latin American topics. LEC
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Study of the institutions, processes, and special problems of selected Latin American countries. Prerequisite: POLS 150 or a course concerning Latin America in the social sciences or history. LEC
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A focus on topics pertinent to all of the underdeveloped areas such as the role of the military, styles of political leadership, land tenure systems, the role of the middle sectors, the nature of bureaucracy, the activity of the students, and foreign policy attitudes. Prerequisite: One of the following: POLS 652, POLS 653, POLS 654, POLS 655, POLS 656, POLS 657, POLS 658, POLS 659. LEC
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Survey of domestic and international political developments in the Middle East. Topics include: emergence of the modern nation-state, the role of Islam, leadership patterns, competing political ideologies, prospects for democratization, foreign policy relations, and regional conflicts. Prerequisite: Nine hours in political science, including POLS 150 and POLS 170 or their honors equivalents, or permission of instructor. LEC
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An exploration of what happens when protesters challenge a state. The course focuses on the interactions and outcomes of dissident and state conflict. Topics include the relation between coercion and protest, strategy, violence, terrorism as adaption, civil war and regime transition. Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC
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Honors Version of POLS 661. Survey of domestic and international political developments in the Arab countries, Iran, Turkey, and Israel. Topics include state-society relations (e.g., forms of political organization, electoral politics, opposition movements, human rights, political Islam, gender), regional and international foreign relations, and the Arab-Israeli conflict. Prerequisite: Nine hours of Political Science, including POLS 150/151 and POLS 170/171, and membership in the University Honors Program; or by permission of instructor. LEC
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A survey of politics in Africa, focused on the countries of sub-Saharan or Black Africa. The course includes a historical discussion of precolonial Africa, colonization and the creation of contemporary states, and the politics of independence, before examining contemporary political systems and the forces influencing patterns of politics on the continent. (Same as AAAS 600.) Prerequisite: POLS 150 or AAAS 105 or AAAS 305 or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course provides basic understanding of fiscal, monetarist, and trade politics; how governments in East Asia use them to pursue growth; the extent to which these governments follow or controvert economics to pursue growth; and how the performances of economies in East Asia relate to the U.S. and global economies. (Same as EALC 666.) Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC
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This course gives students a basic understanding of Islam and Islamic movements, explores the economic, social, political, and cultural context in which these movements take place, and examines the impact of Islam on politics in select countries. Issues such as compatibility of political Islam and democratic politics, political economy in Muslim societies, fundamentalism in Islam, gender relations, identity politics and questions on clash of civilizations are explored. (Same as SOC 640.) Prerequisite: A principal course in sociology, POLS 150, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Examines the epochal changes that have occurred in China from Deng Xiaoping's rise to power in 1978 to the present. Includes a focus on the historical background of the revolutionary period before examining the political and economic changes that spawned the 1989 "prodemocracy" movement at Tiananmen. The course includes an analysis of the events of the 1990s focusing on U.S.-China political and economic relations and the destabilizing effects of inflation, infrastructural reform, political and economic decentralization, and leadership succession. A previous course on China is helpful, but not mandatory. (Same as EALC 585.) LEC
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A study of selected contemporary problems of policy or politics affecting several countries. Course is repeatable for different topics. Prerequisite: POLS 150. LEC
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An evaluation of the formulation of United States foreign policy in the post-World War II period. Economic, military, and diplomatic dimensions of policy; internal and external influences on policy; theories of foreign policy decision-making. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 170. LEC
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An examination of the gains possible from international cooperation and the barriers to achieving cooperation. Theoretical perspectives on international cooperation will be explored along with cases such as trade, the environment, arms control, and the European community. Prerequisite: POLS 170 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Structural theories of the international political economy provide the framework for a consideration of the nature of hegemony, the management problem of multinational corporations, the role of international regimes and organizations, development, and dependency. Prerequisite: Nine hours of political science, including POLS 170. LEC
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International organizations are examined with special emphasis devoted to the United Nations. A central theme of the course rests upon the question of whether strengthened international organization offers the only alternative to further world wars. Prerequisite: POLS 170 and three additional hours of political science. LEC
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This course reviews how philosophical perspectives elucidate the role ethics plays in foreign policy. It covers human rights doctrines, issues of economic and political justice, just war theory (jus ad bellum) and just conduct of war (jus en bello) and humanitarian intervention. Prerequisite: POLS 170 or POLS 171. LEC
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