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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All History courses

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This course will deal with the last fifty years of South African history during which apartheid came to be formulated, supported, and perpetuated, and the forces that were responsible for its disintegration by 1990. Reference will also be made to the transformation process since April 1994. (Same as AAAS 590.) LEC
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A study of the political, social, and economic development of West Africa until the colonial era. Major focus will be on the role of state formation, trade, ecology, and urbanization in the formation of centralized politics from the 11th to the 16th centuries and the impact of the process of Islamization and Muslim revolution on political and socioeconomic change in selected West African societies in the 19th century. LEC
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This course explores the emergence of oral history as a methodology and focuses on the guidelines and ways to effectively use oral history in historical, journalistic, and social science research. The skills of collecting and sorting information gathered through eyewitness accounts, oral traditions, genealogies, investigative reporting procedures, and questionnaires are developed. The nature of the interview in relation to personal and public documents, ordinary conversation, and other related data sources will be considered in this course. LEC
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This course offers an examination of religious thought and practice during the transition from a pre-industrial, unitary order to a modern urban, industrial, and secular society. It will stress the close study of a range of selected texts, including works by such authors and works as Paley, Horsley, Wilberforce, Thomas Arnold, Newman Maurice, essays and reviews, Jowett, Lux Mundi, Gore, and Temple. It will attend to continental European influences on British thought and set theological debate in the wider context of the intellectual history of the period. LEC
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This course surveys the cultural and political history of Tibet from the eighth to the twentieth century. Through readings, lectures, and discussions, students gain familiarity with the dominant features of Tibetan civilization. Topics include the relationship between Tibet and the civilizations of India and China, Tibetan Buddhism, and the tensions between the struggle for Tibetan independence versus claims of Chinese sovereignty. The course also considers the Tibetan diaspora and the reception of knowledge about Tibetan civilization in the West. LEC
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This course considers contemporary China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong in comparative perspective. It begins in the early twentieth century so as to set up a comparison between Nationalist, Communist and Colonial China. It focuses on the evolution from the 1940s to the present studying the political, economic and social systems of the three regions that constitute what we now call 'Greater China' and considers, in particular, important points of difference and similarity between them. LEC
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Course examines the history of Japan from the end of the ancient period (c. 1200 AD) through the medieval era (approximately 1573). Issues covered include the formation and destruction of the Kamakura and Muromachi warrior governments, medieval religious life and culture. Writing assignments provide students with opportunities to gain familiarity with historical methods for analysis and to strengthen their written expression. Not open to students who have taken HIST/EALC 586. LEC
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An exploration of changing attitudes in the United States toward children and youth, their subjective experience, their impact on adults, and the conditions that shaped their development. LEC
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The relationship between the family, in its political, economic and social dimensions, and the larger politico-economic context will be examined from a historical and comparative perspective. Points of special attention will include: a) the decline of the household as unit and focus of production, and the effect of this change upon the position of women and b) the family as a point of organization of political and economic power, systems of inheritance, and the family in the polis. Illustrative materials will be drawn from Europe, Africa, Japan, Latin America, and the United States, ranging from ancient to modern times. LEC
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This survey course traces the changing conceptions of human sexuality from early civilizations to the present. It will include, but not be limited to, such topics as attitudes and beliefs, laws, sciences and medicine, cultural differences, and the impact of economic change on sexual definition and experience. LEC
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This survey course will outline the history of women's involvement in reform movements in the United States from 1600 to the present. It will include, but not be limited to, such topics as labor movements, utopian communities, religious revivals, moral reform, women's rights, civil rights. LEC
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Examines colonial American history from the age of Columbus to the mid-1760s. The course seeks to place colonial American history into the larger historical context, particularly the expansion of the British Empire in the early modern period. Emphasis in the course will be on migration, social and economic conditions, and inter-racial relations. LEC
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This course will focus on the history of American Indians, especially those of the eastern woodlands, from precontact times to the 1830's. Particular emphasis will be on the response of Indians to demographic catastrophe, the development of trade between Indians and colonists, and Indian responses to European colonization in British America and New France. The role of Indians in the American Revolution and the changes caused by Removal will also be treated. LEC
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This course offers a comprehensive examination of federal legislation and court decisions in the United States that have affected American Indians. The history of law and policy will be traced from the colonial period, but the major emphasis will be on the struggle of American Indians to preserve sovereignty in the 19th and 20th centuries. LEC
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This course focuses on the growing importance of the issues of slavery and freedom in the United States between 1815-1848. Recently, scholars have demonstrated that the period was one of disorienting, dramatic, and unprecedented change as politics, economics, racial and gender roles, and key institutions were permanently transformed. The course will examine these changes and how they, in turn, remade the values and identities of all Americans. LEC
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The history of the United States in the First Half of the Twentieth Century. LEC
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A history of the United States from its entry into World War II to the present. A study of such selected topics as women's history and feminism, race relations and the Afro-American civil rights movement, power, poverty, the military-industrial complex, McCarthyism, and presidential administrations. LEC
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The people of the United States experienced significant social political, and cultural change during the 1960's. This course studies the history of these changes, focusing on the American people, the institutions that shaped their lives, and the social and political movements, for and against change, that surfaced during this decade. Specific topics include: the struggle for racial equality, the Kennedy, Johnson, and Nixon administrations; the Vietnam War, the antiwar movement, New Left, and counterculture; feminism's rebirth; the white backlash; and the resurgence of political and cultural conservatism. Course requirements include readings, discussion, and original historical research and writing. LEC
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A survey of Western history with emphasis on such topics as Native Americans and Indian-white relations, environment and resource use, exploration and discovery, expansionism and Manifest Destiny, economic development, urban, rural, and alternative communities, ethnic and racial experience, women and violence. Consideration will also be given to topics such as fur trade, mining, the cattle business, and agriculture. LEC
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A study of Indians in the United States from colonial times to the present. Consideration will be given to the political, social, and cultural history of selected Indian tribes and to Indian-white relations with particular attention to the Indian point of view. Other topics will include a comparative study of Indian policy of nations colonizing in America, cultural intermingling and cultural conflict, and current Indian problems. Slides, films, and guest speakers (including American Indians) will be used in the course. LEC
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A survey of the history of culture and society from prehistory to the present. Topics include Native American life, Euro-American resettlement, Bleeding Kansas and the Civil War, agricultural settlement, urbanization and industrialization, depression and recovery, and modern Kansas in transition. LEC
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A study of the post-frontier era and the struggle to create a regional identity, drawn from legends of the heroic past, varieties of racial and ethnic experience, political culture, and the possibilities of the land. LEC
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A history of the Plains Indians from the sixteenth century to the present. Consideration will be given to tribal culture and society, to the impact of the fur trade and international rivalries on tribes, and to Indian-white relations. LEC
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An examination of the process by which people in the United States have acquired their identities, learned the way of their society so they could function within it, and have transmitted their culture from generation to generation. LEC
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An introductory study of the development of the American economy from colonial times to the present. Investigates long-term trends in output, population, and output per capita, as well as short period fluctuations, and the variables and institutions that determined these fluctuations and trends. (Same as ECON 530.) Prerequisite: ECON 104 or ECON 142 and ECON 144. LEC
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The origins of American diplomacy from the wars of the 18th century and the Revolution to 1901. The foreign relations of the American government and the reactions of the American people to international problems. LEC
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An examination of the history of United States foreign relations over the course of the twentieth century. Treats America's emergence as a world power before World War I, imperialism and interventionism, involvement in World War I and World War II, internationalism, the Cold War and America's anti-communist crusade, third world nationalism, responses to a global economy, and the obligations of a military superpower in a chaotic world. LEC
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A history of Afro-America from the end of the Civil War to the present. Consideration will be given to such topics as America's capitulation to racism, blacks in agriculture, blacks and the labor movement, Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois, civil rights protest, migration and urbanization, Marcus Garvey and black nationalism, the Harlem Renaissance, blacks during the New Deal, blacks in recent politics, the modern civil rights movement, ghetto uprisings, and the changing relationships among race, caste, and class. LEC
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This course investigates the origins of modern European science. Various topics in the physical and biological sciences will be treated, including the works of Galileo, Harvey, Newton, Descartes, Boyle, Malpighi, et al. Scientific societies and technological developments will also be treated as will the relationship of science, society, religion, and other intellectual currents. Recommended: A survey in the history of science (HIST 284) or equivalent. LEC
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A survey of the development of agriculture from prehistory through the present. The major themes of the course will be how various methods of farming have spread around the world, how new techniques have transformed agriculture, and how peasants and farmers have interacted with cities and governments. LEC
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The development of modern biology, from about 1600 to the present; topics discussed include natural history, anatomy and physiology, cell theory, evolutionary biology, genetics, bacteriology, scientific institutions, technological developments, transplants, bionics, cloning, genetic engineering, vaccination, iatrogenic disease, and fluoridation. LEC
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An intensive examination of the history and current status of entrepreneurship in China, Japan, and other nations in East Asia. This course investigates the role of entrepreneurs in Asian economic development from the nineteenth century to the present, as well as the relation between entrepreneurship and Asian cultural traditions. The opportunities and challenges of entrepreneurship in East Asia today are also considered. (Same as EALC 520.) LEC
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This course examines witches, witchcraft, and magic in Europe in the late medieval and early modern period (approximately 1200-1700 C.E.). Particular emphasis will be on the variety of historical and anthropological approaches that have been used to study the subject and their meaning in the context of gender politics and gender theory. (Same as WGSS 646.) LEC
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This discussion course will cover the development of feminist theories from the late Middle Ages to the present. Reading will include Pisan, Wollstonecraft, Mill, Freud, Woolf, Beauvoir, Friedan, Daly, Kristeva, and others. (Same as WGSS 549.) LEC
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A survey of the history of United States business, with emphasis upon the post-Civil War period, that explores the changes to American business brought about by modernizing processes. Topics will include structural and institutional changes, technological and marketing innovations, and relations with workers, with government at its various levels, and with the public. LEC
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A historical study of the colonial origins, revolutionary development, creation of, struggle over and preservation of the American constitutional system from 1763 to 1887. LEC
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A historical study of the evolution of thought and practice of the constitutional system from the conflict over government regulation of business, through the expansion of executive and legislative power, to the evolution of protections of Bill of Rights guarantees by the Supreme Court and the reaction against that evolution. LEC
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These interdisciplinary, team-taught courses survey the artistic, intellectual, and historical development of the great cities of the world. London, Paris, and Rome have been offered in recent semesters, and other cities will be studied in the future. LEC
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A survey of the history of Palestine from biblical origins to the Muslim conquest, with emphasis on such topics as social and religious institutions, cultural and communal diversity, and relations between foreign powers and local authorities. The course further explores the roots of the present conflictual situation in this part of the Middle East. LEC
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A survey of the economic, social, political, and cultural history of the United States from its entry into World War II to the present. Students with credit in HIST 614 or HIST 616 should not enroll in HIST 666. LEC
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This course considers various theories of diaspora (including whether the Jewish experience should be considered a model for diaspora culture), as well as several of the most prominent "new diasporic" formation in the modern period, such as the Black Atlantic, South and East Asian diasporas, and the Romani (or "Gypsies"). Our study of these diasporas helps us to rethink relations among politics, territory and identity in our time. We consider the way rhetorics of collective memory and ethnohistory contribute to the maintenance of group identities outside the homeland. Our focus on diasporas also helps us to gain a clearer sense of the historical origins, and the possible futures of nation-states as the basic building blocks of human polity. LEC
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A seminar designed to introduce students to the theory and practice of historical inquiry. A research paper will be required. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of upper-class courses in history and completion of HIST 301 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Topics will include: The nature of historical knowledge; the problems of historical inquiry; a critique of philosophies of history; and a study of history and related disciplines. (Same as PHIL 696.) Prerequisite: A distribution course in philosophy. LEC
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A study of the increasing interaction among world societies since 1500 and an investigation of the long-term developments behind current world problems. Major topics include western expansion since 1500, the spread of state sovereignty, the formation of a world economy, and spread of international institutions. The current world problems investigated will vary, but may include issues such as environmental crises, human rights, migration, free trade and the spread of consumer culture, ethnicity and nationalism, and international intervention within states. (Same as INTL 705.) LEC
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An introduction to Medieval Latin for students pursuing medieval studies. The material covered will include selections from various literary works, the Vulgate, law codes, legal documents, and other sources from the period 300-1500. May not be retaken for credit. Prerequisite: Four semesters of college Latin or the equivalent, and/or consent of instructor of Ancient-Medieval graduate adviser. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of the kinds of museums, their various missions, and their characteristics and potentials as research, education, and public service institutions responsible for collections of natural and cultural objects. (Same as AMS 720, BIOL 788, GEOL 782, and MUSE 702.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Consideration of the goals of an institution's public education services, developing programs, identifying potential audiences, developing audiences, and funding. Workshops and demonstrations are designed for students to gain practical experience working with various programs and developing model programs. (Same as AMS 797, BIOL 784, GEOL 784, and MUSE 705.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will acquaint the future museum professional with problems in conserving all types of collections. Philosophical and ethical approaches will be discussed, as well as the changing practices regarding conservation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on detection and identification of causes of deterioration in objects made of organic and inorganic materials, and how these problems can be remedied. Storage and care of objects will also be considered. (Same as AMS 714, BIOL 700, GEOL 780, and MUSE 706.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will consider the role of exhibits as an integrated part of museum collection management, research, and public service. Lecture and discussion will focus on issues involved in planning and producing museum exhibits. Laboratory exercises will provide first hand experience with basic preparation techniques. Emphasis will be placed on the management of an exhibit program in both large and small museums in the major disciplines. (Same as AMS 700, BIOL 787, GEOL 781, and MUSE 703.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museum collections, their associated data, and their use in scholarly research; cataloging, storage, fumigation, automated information management and related topics will be presented for museums of art, history, natural history and anthropology. (Same as AMS 730, BIOL 798, GEOL 785, and MUSE 704.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Study of the principles and practices applicable to the preservation, care, and administration of archives and manuscripts. Practical experience will be an integral part of this course. (Same as MUSE 707.) LEC
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Lecture, discussion, and laboratory exercises on the nature of museums as organizations; accounting, budget cycles, personnel management, and related topics will be presented using, as appropriate, case studies and a simulated museum organization model. (Same as AMS 731, BIOL 785, GEOL 783, and MUSE 701.) Prerequisite: Museum Studies student, Indigenous Nations Studies student, or consent of instructor. LEC
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Reading and discussion of selected historical topics, designed specifically for K-12 educators. Pedagogical methods and resources for the study of history will be addressed. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. LEC
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An advanced survey of the history, culture, and contemporary affairs of , China, Japan and Korea, specifically designed for K-12 educators who wish to incorporate East Asian topics into their classroom teaching. Pedagogical methods and resources for the study of East Asia will be emphasized. Topics covered will address relevant benchmarks in the state curricular standards in social studies, themes from the Advanced Placement world history examination, and the national standards in world history. (Same as EALC 747.) Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. LEC
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The aim of the course is to provide students with the linguistic tools needed for archival research in East Asian history by assisting them in gaining experience reading primary and secondary language materials in Japanese and/or Chinese including texts in classical forms of these languages. After studying the rules of classical grammar and the particulars of historical materials as needed, students will read primary documents in conjunction with secondary readings in Japanese and/or Chinese. Fundamental aspects of paleography may also be introduced in this course depending on student need. Prerequisite: Capability of reading Japanese or Chinese and permission of the instructor. LEC
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Provides directed, practical experience in the collection, care, use, and/or management of historical materials. (Same as AMS 799, ANTH 799, BIOL 799, GEOL 723, and MUSE 799.) Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. FLD
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Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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Reading and discussion of selected topics. LEC
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Research Seminar on selected topics. SEM
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Analysis of what historians do and how the profession of history has developed in terms of training, concepts, and practices in both research and teaching. Consideration also of the major controversies that have developed over historical method and historical interpretation, giving greatest emphasis to American and European historiography by providing a relationship to the leading concepts of world history. LEC
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The core course for each thematic major field in the graduate program in History. The course, offered in a colloquium style format, will serve as an introduction to the principal standard literature in the field, and will consider the full range of methodologies or approaches appropriate to the field. LEC
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This course will help train future professional historians to teach. It will focus on a variety of pedagogical topics for future college history faculty, including: developing students critical and analytical thinking; teaching research skills; promoting student involvement/participation; determining course goals; use of multi-media technology. In addition to attending class meetings of History 807, students will attend as observers throughout the semester one 500/600-level course in an area relevant to their future teaching and complete the readings assigned to the class. They will produce a course portfolio for an undergraduate course, including: a syllabus designed by the student; a set of assignments that will be part of that course, such as examinations and papers; sample lesson plans; an annotated bibliography of materials relevant to the subject-matter of the course. LEC
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A readings-oriented course which explores themes in two or more geographic and/or chronological fields of history. The benefits and disadvantages of comparative methodologies will be analyzed. Topics will vary each term but may include the examination of such subjects as the history of urbanization, labor, colonialism, immigration, the family, political thought, or industrialization. Prerequisite: Varies with area of subtopic. LEC
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This seminar is oriented toward those advanced graduate students who wish to improve their editing skills. Students who enroll may edit their own writing, the writing of other class members, or "old texts." Editing will be practiced as though the product were to be published. Students who already have publishing commitments are especially encouraged to enroll. The format of class meetings will be flexible and every effort will be made to center class work around the individual needs of those who enroll. LEC
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This course examines the history and theory of popular culture in 19th and 20th century Latin America from a cross-disciplinary perspective. Some of the topics covered could include: the historical development of urban popular culture from broadsides and newspapers to radio and telenovelas; the politics of music from the tango to the new song movement; folk art vs. High art in the definition of national identity; cultural imperialism; sports and public rituals as spectacles for the working class; relationship between mass culture and the novel; gender roles and social order as revealed in forms of popular culture; and the politics of the New Latin American Cinema. Discussions will be in English. No prerequisites. LEC
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The principal purpose of the colloquium is to understand the evolution of government in the Iberian Peninsula and Latin America, with a special focus on efforts to promote democracy and regular, meaningful elections in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Colloquium students read basic literature on the Iberian background, the colonial experience, caudillismo, and militarism as well as on democratic theory, political ideology, political participation, and the development of electoral systems. LEC
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Explores the growth of the city and urban culture from the Spanish conquest to the present. Focus on such topics as crime, public health, leisure activities, artisans, unionization, residential patterns and transportation. LEC
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Explores the historiography and major themes and problems of the history of colonial Latin America. Ordinarily this will involve reading and discussion of historiographical articles, major works in the field and works involving new approaches and perspectives. A long historiographical paper will be required. LEC
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Major problems in class conflict resulting from industrialization of peripheral economies. Focus on such topics as labor movements, worker-inspired revolutions, women in the workforce, the ideology of work, labor migration, occupational culture and worker's relationship to the state. LEC
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This seminar examines the history of Latin American attitudes and policies toward other parts of the world as well as among the Latin American nations themselves. Examples of topics of interest are anti-imperialism, Pan-Americanism, foreign cultural influences, non-intervention, international cooperation and conflict, dependency, transnational corporations, regional integration, international law and doctrine and national security. LEC
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Research seminar which examines major topics in the recent history of the Andean and Southern Cone countries. Topics such as the history of poverty, the dirty wars and the rise of military regimes, the social collapse of Colombia, Argentina and Peru, and the persistence of traditional cultures in the face of capitalist transformations will be thoroughly explored. LEC
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Explores the historiography, methods and themes of Latin American social history from the conquest to the present. Sessions will focus on specific groups including the history of indigenous groups, peasants, slaves, women, families, workers, and the poor. A long historiographical paper will be required. LEC
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This course examines the varied elite and popular responses to the creation of a capitalist economy (agrarian and industrial) in Britain between 1750 and 1890. LEC
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This course examines the main developments in the political, social, and cultural history of Britain since 1890. The aim is to trace the relationship between political movements and socio-cultural attitudes and institutions. LEC
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This course will engage with recent scholarship on the Renaissance and Reformation, the Civil War and the English Republic. LEC
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The course will deal selectively with themes in the political and cultural interaction of the peoples of the British Isles with peoples overseas, the expansion and contraction of empire, and the rationales for these processes. LEC
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This course provides an introduction to the rich tradition of British writings on politics through a close reading of a number of classic texts, interpreted in their historical settings. LEC
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This course will deal analytically and synoptically with religion in Britain from the reformation to the present with special reference to the Church of England, and will focus on the themes of ecclesiology, ecclesiastical polity, and political theology. LEC
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The colloquium covers the period beginning with the decline and partitions with Poland and ends with the outbreak of World War I. The major areas of study are the development of modern national consciousness among Poles, Czechs, Slovaks, Magyars, and Ukrainians, and the status of the Jews in these areas; economic, social, and educational development; and the rise of modern political parties. Prerequisite: HIST 557. LEC
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The course considers the challenges of modernity in Eastern Europe, with a focus on the lands of the former Habsburg Empire. The course is designed to introduce students to major issues in modern Eastern European history and historiography, with an emphasis on recent scholarship. Topics include: nationalism, identity formation, anti-Semitism, modernization and urbanization, World War I, interwar nation-states, World War II, Communist takeovers, everyday life under Communism, dissidence, Solidarity, the collapse of Communism, and post-socialist transitions. LEC
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A group readings course that begins with Russia in the medieval period and continues through the end of the twentieth century. Topics may vary each term, but may include such subjects as political, social, religious, gender, or intellectual history. The course will focus around significant interpretive issues and the historiography that address them. Basic familiarity with the chronology and the main problems of Russian history is assumed. LEC
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The focus will be on reading and discussion of historical literature on the end of Imperial Russia, the Russian revolutions, and the Soviet Union and its aftermath. LEC
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This graduate seminar will focus on interactions between the so-called Old and New Worlds in the three centuries following Columbus' voyages. The course will pay particular attention to the changes in the lives of Europeans, Africans, and the peoples of the Americas as a result of the emergence of transatlantic economies, empires, and cultural systems. LEC
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This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in the history of Europe between the Renaissance and the French Revolution. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The first in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
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This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in early modern European history. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The second in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
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From the French Revolution into the contemporary era. The third in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
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This course will concentrate upon a number of selected topics in modern European history. Emphasis will be placed upon certain problems within this period and the recent historiography that deals with them. The fourth in a sequence of colloquia in Modern European History. Required for European history graduate students and students majoring in other fields whose secondary fields correspond to this time frame. LEC
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Intensive survey of significant works in the field from colonial times to the present, with attention to bibliography, research methods and needs, and leading issues in interpretation. LEC
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Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of Colonial and Revolutionary America, including appropriate attention to new approaches and techniques in research. The first course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. Required of all U.S. history graduate students. LEC
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Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of the United States in the 19th century. The third course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. LEC
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Study of the leading interpretations of major issues in the history of the United States in the 20th century. The third course in the sequence of colloquia in United States history. LEC
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This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of manhood, womanhood, and gender systems. (Same as AMS 835 and WGSS 835.) LEC
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This colloquium will cover theoretical and topical readings on the history of women in the United States from the pre-contact period to the present. It is designed to familiarize students with the most important and current historiography in the field. (Same as AMS 836 and WGSS 836.) LEC
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This colloquium will approach the history of women from a comparative perspective through theoretical and topical readings on women in at least two different cultures. (Same as AMS 837 and WGSS 837.) LEC
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This course provides an overview of theories and methods used in material culture studies and their application to historical research, writing, and presentation. Topics may vary from semester to semester, but could include vernacular architecture, museum studies, anthropology, cultural geography, historical archeology, and perceptual theory. The course will consist of intensive reading, discussion, and written work. While it is not limited to a particular geographical or chronological area, or discipline, given the state of the field most topics will be drawn from U.S. history. LEC
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An inquiry into the source material upon a specific subject. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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Design and completion of an independent project, culminating in the production of a professional-quality paper based on original, primary source research. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. LEC
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A research seminar oriented around cross-regional, comparative, and transnational aspects of history, culminating in production of a professional-quality paper based in original, primary source research. SEM
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A research seminar in specialized aspects of Roman history. May be repeated for credit. LEC
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A seminar involving the study of the importance and influence of the noble families of Rome on Roman history (200-27 B.C.) with special emphasis on the literary and numismatic evidence. Reading knowledge of Latin will be essential for this course. LEC
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