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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Education courses

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In this course, students will explore a variety of research-based instructional theories, models, and strategies for teaching and learning of mathematics and science. They will apply and evaluate the usage of one instructional strategy in an action research project in their classrooms. Prerequisite: C&T 709. LEC
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This course will explore current research on issues important to middle and high school science teachers so they can use research to support and improve their classroom practice. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in middle level or high school science or permission of instructor. LEC
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The primary purpose of this course is to examine assessment and evaluation in science and mathematics, including assessment of students, teachers, schools, and educational programs. The course will examine technical characteristics of various assessment methods including both traditional and alternative methods. In additional and alternative methods. In addition, the course will analyze and discuss various controversial issues in assessment such as authentic assessment, and large scale assessment, and large scale assessments, assessment for accountability, and equity issues. LEC
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A survey of the concepts and processes that provide the focus of modern science and mathematics curricula will be central to the course. Students develop a standards-based framework for a school science or mathematics program. The course includes an analysis of national and state recommendations for the reform of science and mathematics education in the context of our state and local educational systems, which is applied by evaluating exemplary instructional materials and activities appropriate for classroom use. Prerequisite: C&T 709. LEC
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Intensive supervised experience working with improvement of science curriculum and/or instruction in an educational setting. Credit in any one semester may range from one to three hours; and total credit may not exceed three hours. Prerequisite: Two graduate courses in science education and prior consent of practicum supervisor. FLD
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Intensive supervised experience working with improvement of mathematics curriculum and/or instruction in an educational setting. Credit in any one semester may range from one to three hours; and total credit may not exceed three hours. Prerequisite: Two graduate courses in mathematics education and prior consent of practicum supervisor. FLD
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This course will explore current research on issues important to middle and high school mathematics teachers so they can use research to support and improve their classroom practice. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in middle level or high school mathematics or permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of issues in a particular area of mathematics or science education. The course may be repeated for different topics. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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An examination of current topics and issues from social science perspectives. Special emphasis is given to effective integration of one of the social sciences, such as anthropology, geography, political science, science technology and society, and these topics affect issues of curriculum at both elementary and secondary levels. Students will need to confer with the instructor of record to determine which topic will be the current focus of the course. LEC
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The purpose of the course is to offer preservice and practicing K-12 social studies educators the following: (1) an overview of theoretical bases for social studies education and of the social studies and discipline specific curriculum standards; (2) a review of the major curricular and extracurricular K-12 social studies programs; (3) strategies for the design, implementation, and evaluation of social studies programs; and (4) experience with the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of a social studies program. LEC
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A study of trends and issues relating to, and needed changes in the content, organization, emphasis, resources and equipment, methods, devices and evaluation in the social studies. Consideration of related problems such as achieving meaning and understanding, providing for individual differences, providing motivation, the cooperative assignment and socialized recitation. Students will be permitted to concentrate on those problems of particular interest to them. Prerequisite: Nine hours of Education including educational psychology. LEC
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Extension and application of economic concepts and theories through integration into the scope and sequence of the school curriculum. The process will include the development and field testing of a project that utilizes appropriate concepts, materials, community resources and techniques for integrating economics into the total curriculum. Prerequisite: C&T 763. LEC
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An examination of current international topics and issues from an economic education perspective. Special emphasis is given to effective integration of global topics and issues into the curriculum at both elementary and secondary levels. Students survey and analyze economic education resource materials and develop international lessons for use in their own classrooms. This course is offered during summer term, locally, and as a study abroad option. This course has been offered two times previously as T&L 798-summer 1993 at the Regents Center and in Great Britain. LEC
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The purpose of the course is to explore readings on effective practice and current research on issues important to social studies teachers. Knowledge gained from the exploration of readings will be used to develop a plan and implementation procedures for improving classroom practice. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in social studies education or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Prerequisite: Consent of adviser and instructor. RSH
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The course, taught as a capstone seminar, will provide a review of current trends and issues in theories, practices, and events within curricular and instructional efforts in American education. Topics studied may include constructivism, connectivism in the digital age, contemporary theories and theorists such as Vygotsky, online instruction and the Internet's potential and growth, the new Cult of Efficiency, stigmatization and standardized testing, and charter schools. Student composition of each class will influence the final syllabus, which may include other topics reflective of student interests and goals. The class is designed for those in the final course phase of their doctoral studies. Students in their first or second semester of their programs will not be encouraged to enroll in the class. LEC
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A review of recent research on the conceptualization, measurement, and improvement of teaching effectiveness. Particular attention is given to the history of efforts to improve teaching, to the reasons why such efforts have often been unsuccessful, and to the recent contributions of the "micro-criteria" approach to the problem. LEC
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An intensive study of the theoretical and research bases for curriculum supervision and improvement. Topics include models and practices in supervision and staff development, skills and instruments used in curriculum assessment, coordination of both human and material resources, and the dynamics of change strategies. LEC
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This course addresses philosophical questions pertaining to curriculum and teaching across a range of educational contexts. These questions center on epistemology, ethics, and the assumptions underlying alternative approaches to research in education. Students completing this course should be able to engage in philosophical inquiry and apply relevant philosophical literature and principles to the examination of curriculum and teaching. LEC
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A study of the development, issues, and programs for the preparation of teachers. Open to all regular graduate students. LEC
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Supports novice researchers in extending their understanding of the theoretical frameworks underlying qualitative research, qualitative methodologies, the research process and its relationship with curriculum inquiry. During the course we will discuss various forms of qualitative research methods, approaches to research, and perspectives in methodology relate to curriculum inquiry. We will explore the intertwining of data generation, analysis, and writing. In addition, we will focus on refining data generation techniques, strategies for data analysis, data interpretation, and various forms of reporting/writing. Prior course work: Introduction to a graduate level qualitative research course or permission from the instructor. Prerequisite: Introduction to a graduate level qualitative research course or permission from the instructor. LEC
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This course examines the theories and practices of several educational orientations that comprise "critical pedagogy." Students examine the historical roots and evolution of this broad orientation toward education. Recurring themes in the class are relations between knowledge and curriculum, the school and society, and teachers and students. Students completing the course should be able to analyze educational phenomena through a critical theoretical lens. Open to all doctoral students and advanced masters students with instructor permission. LEC
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This course will focus on both the conduct and findings of research related to English/Language Arts Education. Its purpose will be to foster discussion among students concerning paradigms that have shaped the field of English/Language Arts as well as encourage critique of the ways in which these paradigms are enacted in research. In this course, each student will develop a reading list on a topic of interest related to research in English/Language Arts Education and/or pursue the writing of an individual research proposal. Prerequisite: Admission to master's or doctoral program in C&T, emphasis in English/Language Arts Education. LEC
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The course will focus on (1) a review of the practical and theoretical problems of developing, in institutions of higher education, programs for the diagnosis and/or evaluation of classroom instruction, including use of videotape feedback for diagnosis, and the development of surveys for evaluation for diagnosis of teaching, and (2) the importance of careful administrative and review procedures as the evaluation of teaching becomes more formal and consequential. Three hours of credit will be awarded to those enrolled in the laboratory section of the course. LEC
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This course introduces students to the processes of planning, conducting, and evaluating mathematics and science research and evaluation in education. This course emphasizes the methods and techniques used in both quantitative mathematics and science research and evaluation methodologies. Prerequisite: A PRE course in statistics. LEC
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The purpose of this graduate level course is to stimulate and communicate systematic research and thinking in Social Studies Education. Its purpose is to foster the creation and exchange of ideas and research findings that will expand knowledge about purposes, conditions, and effects of schooling and education about society and social relations. LEC
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A survey of research in elementary, secondary, and higher education economic education. After initial, mutual readings, and discussions, class members will determine a list of broad research questions around which we will focus our readings. Each student is responsible for developing a reading list on one of the topics and reporting on selected readings. Class meetings will focus on summarizing and critiquing published research. Purpose of this course is to prepare doctoral students for comprehensive examinations and dissertation research. LEC
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for post-master's level students. LEC
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Supervised and directed experiences in selected educational settings. The adviser will schedule regular observations of the field experience and conferences with the student. Written summaries and evaluations of the field experiences will be prepared independently by the student, a representative of the cooperating agencies, and the adviser. Open only to advanced students. Field experience credit in any one semester may not exceed five hours, and total credit may not exceed eight hours. FLD
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To meet the college teaching experience requirement for doctoral programs, a student shall engage in a semester-long, planned, instructional activity that shall include college classroom teaching under supervision. Planning shall be done with the adviser and/or the member of the faculty who will supervise the experience. The activity shall be done under the supervision of a member of the University of Kansas faculty or by an individual or individuals designated by the candidate's committee. FLD
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Prerequisite: Prior graduate course work in the area of study and consent of instructor. RSH
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Intermediate vocabulary (700 words) for basic school routines and subjects will be taught using curricular materials to practice SEE 2 vocabulary and affix markers. Two college sign classes of any kind. LEC
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An intermediate level, educationally oriented vocabulary (450 words) taught in PSE/ASL. Comparison of literally and conceptually signed sentences. Prerequisite: Any sign course, admittance into Deaf Education Masters Program. LEC
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Focus on the family as the primary teachers of deaf and hard-of-hearing infants and toddlers. The purpose of the class is twofold: to develop an understanding of the effect of deafness and to develop skills to deal with its intervention. Future teachers, early-childhood specialists, and related service providers will participate in discussion, simulations, and applied exercises in acquiring course competencies. Prerequisite: Sign class of any type. LEC
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This course is designed to increase the students' awareness of learning in the classroom and to familiarize them with the role of the school and the community. Institutions and resources that support children and families will be addressed through large and small group sessions and field experiences. Emphasis is given to the diverse nature of schools, communities, and their populations. In addition, the course will acclimate students with the School of Education programs, admissions procedures, and curriculum offerings. Successful completion of this course does not guarantee eventual admission of the School of Education's Teacher Education Program. Prerequisite: Successful completion of C&T 100. LEC
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The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to elementary and middle school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC
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The focus of this course is on developing integration strategies and acquiring computer skills for using instructional technology and educational software, digital media, and information technologies appropriate to middle school and high school teaching environments. Students will gain expertise in (a) the selection of appropriate instructional technologies and digital media for use in the classroom; (b) production of technology-based instructional materials; and (c) the evaluation and validation of a variety of electronic information sources. Prerequisite: Admission to the Teacher Education Program. LEC
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A historical approach to the major social and philosophical foundations of American education, with an emphasis on the relation of educational theory to classroom practice. LEC
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Supervised field experience in an on-site educational setting that provides the student an opportunity to study and participate in the professional activities of a designated educational setting with emphasis on the planning, implementation, and evaluation of such activities. Regular conferences with faculty to evaluate student progress will be scheduled. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-certificate baccalaureate program. LEC
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Supervised field experience in an on-site educational setting with increasing emphasis placed on an integration of formal learning and in site experience. Regular conferences with faculty will be scheduled. Prerequisite: Admission to the non-certificate baccalaureate program. FLD
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Only one enrollment permitted each semester. A maximum of four hours will apply toward the bachelor's degree. Prerequisite: Recommendation of adviser and consent of instructor. IND
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A study of the changing role and character of childhood and youth as stages of life in the context of American educational and cultural history. LEC
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education students, primarily for undergraduates. LEC
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This special course of study in residential staff skill enhancement and administration is an exploration of concepts and skills necessary for becoming an effective paraprofessional staff member in a residential living unit. Each class session will include presentations and experiential learning on topics to develop or improve interpersonal skills and skill in dealing with special concerns. The course is required or recommended for all residence and scholarship hall staff and open to upperclass or graduate students interested in student personnel work. LEC
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This course introduces the concepts and skills involved in understanding and analyzing research in education and related areas. The course provides an overview of basic, general knowledge of various research methodologies. Students should expect to study much of this material in greater depth through additional course work before being prepared to conduct independent research. However, this course should enhance their ability to locate, read, comprehend, and critically analyze research artilces and reports. Topics in the course include quantitative and qualitative methods and designs, historical and descriptive research, and program evaluation. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate standing in the School of Education. LEC
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This course provides the prospective teacher with an overview of the following topics: 1) The role of various levels of government in controlling schools, 2) the composition and functioning of school boards, 3) the way schools are funded, 4) the laws affecting school operations and teachers' jobs, 5) the ethical responsibilities of teachers, 6) the role of teacher unions and associations, and 7) the terms of teachers' employment. LEC
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This class provides students with an understanding multicultural education as an instructional concept, educational reform movement, and systemic process meant to ensure educational equity for all people, especially those who have been inadequately served and/or historically discriminated against because of their racial/ethnic or linguistic backgrounds, gender or sexual orientation, socio-economic status, and special needs. Students will examine different theoretical approaches that inform the practice of multicultural education and explore the contribution of various social sciences to the field. LEC
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This course will provide an introduction to the sociology of education. This course is designed to fulfill the doctoral core requirement for social, historical and philosophical foundations of education. Specific topics will include: conflict over the purposes of education; how those purposes are-or are not-translated into actual classroom life; how educational systems have developed historically, how status, and more specifically race, class and gender relations, affect student experiences; and contemporary policy and reform movements. LEC
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An introduction to the role, responsibilities, expectations and major duties of elementary, middle, and high school building administrators. Students are presented typical problems faced by school administrators through simulations and role playing and are expected, through reflection and discussion, to develop viable solutions. LEC
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A description and analysis of national, state, and local strategies for the financial support of education, utilizing social, economic, legal, and political frameworks. Particular attention to the principles of revenue acquisition and distribution at the local and state level for public school operations, with analysis of how these principles apply to Kansas. Designed for the wide variety of educational practitioners regardless of organizational and degree levels. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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A study of legal principles and issues affecting educational policy making and practice with emphasis on student and teacher rights, equity, and the administration of schools. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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An overview of the theory and practice of personnel administration. The course focuses on the processes of recruitment, selection, training and development, evaluation, compensation, equal employment opportunity, and labor relations. LEC
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An introduction to various methods of problem identification; strategies of information gathering; schemes for the analysis of qualitative and quantitative data; models of problem resolution and decision making; and communication methods appropriate for differing audiences. Students will build basic computer, library, decision and communication skills useful in future administrative practice and subsequent course work. LEC
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An overview of the theory and practice of the management, recruitment, selection, compensation, placement, and development of personnel in the school setting. LEC
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An examination of the major ideas that have shaped practice in the schools. Emphasis is placed on assisting the student with the development of a coherent and consistent personal philosophy of education upon which administrative practice can be based. LEC
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A study of the roles and goals of education in the United States, the interrelationships among schools and students, teachers, administrators, and parents, and the culture of schools. LEC
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This course focuses on strategies for integrating educational technology in K-12 schools, universities, government or industry. Topics include applying technology in: a) understanding basic technology operations b) planning and designing learning experiences, c) curriculum development, d) assessment and evaluation e) productivity and professional practices, and considering f) social, ethical, legal, and human issues. Students produce a comprehensive electronic portfolio that describes the theoretical perspectives that guide their technology integrations strategies and evidence that demonstrates their competencies. LEC
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This course examines education in urban communities through the foundational disciplines of history, philosophy, and the social sciences. Particular attention is given to ways in which the changing social and political contexts of American cities affect the educational process. LEC
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A comprehensive study of influential persons and movements in the development of educational thought, Eastern and Western, from ancient times to the present. Emphasis on those ideas and historical roots which are relevant to contemporary issues in teaching and school administration. LEC
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An analytic inquiry into basic philosophical positions and issues relevant to education. The difference between ELPS 770 and ELPS 771 is that the latter is topically arranged and does not necessarily follow a historical sequence; it normally proceeds by problems and schools of thought. LEC
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A study of significant philosophical problems encountered when comparing educational systems. Special emphasis on the implications of axiological analysis for educational theory and practice in different areas of the world. Relationships among the social sciences, philosophy, and the international or cross-cultural venture in education. The importance of systematic value-theory in comparative research and international education. LEC
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Analysis of the role of social science in comparative education as perceived by different philosophies or schools of thought, such as Marxism, phenomenology, empiricism, pragmatism, and linguistic analysis. LEC
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An in-depth study of prominent European thinkers who have contributed to educational theory and practice (e.g., Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Herbert, Froebel, Montessori, Nietzsche, Freud, Piaget, Ortegay Gassit, etc.). Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC
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A study of the relation between education and culture in America from colonial times to the present. American schools are considered in the wider context of cultural and social change. LEC
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An exploration of changing attitudes toward children and youth, their subjective experience, their impact on adults, and the conditions that shaped their development. Special attention will be given to the relationship between the changing nature of childhood as a social and cultural category and the development of the education profession. LEC
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Select explorations into such provocative and problematic trends in current educational theory as Marxism, behaviorism, phenomenology, existentialism, analytic philosophy, hedonism, nonverbal education, etc. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC
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This course will provide an introduction to the methodology of historical research in education. This course is designed to fulfill the doctoral core requirement for research methods in education for students interested in doing this type of research. Specific topics will include: the historiography of education; working with primary and secondary documents; oral history as method and documentation, quantitative approaches to history; constructing historical narratives; the question of interpretation. LEC
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This course is designed for beginning master's degree students and for doctoral students who have had no previous administrative experience in college or university settings. Students will be introduced to the function and responsibilities of major administrative divisions of a college or university and to the major tasks of administration: planning, programming, budgeting, staffing, managing. An emphasis will be placed on current issues facing higher education and students will be introduced to the major journals of the field. As part of the course requirements, students will spend some time familiarizing themselves with one or more administrative offices on a college campus. Prerequisite: Admission to study in higher education at the graduate level. LEC
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This course is designed to include the study of the history and development of student personnel services in higher education, the role and function of the student affairs administrator, contemporary issues and problems, and an understanding of the organization and role of student affairs administration within higher education settings. Prerequisite: Admission to the higher education program or permission of instructor. LEC
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A special course of study to meet current needs of education professionals -- primarily for graduate students. LEC
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Media surrounds today's learning environments. How can you effectively engage learners with multimedia, meaningful interactions, and motivational strategies? This course will take a hands-on practical approach to creating interactive educational multimedia products including, but not limited to, digital images, movies, podcast, Web publishing and educational games. Also, students will learn about the underlying learning theories of educational media development. LEC
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This course explores the design and use of new educational technologies to support constructivist learning. Throughout the course, students will (1) get hands-on experiences with emerging educational technologies, (2) examine how the underlying learning theories are reified into concrete learning environments, and (3) analyze how the affordances of new technologies (e.g., modeling and visualization) can facilitate the constructivist learning processes. This course is suitable for students who wish to develop greater knowledge about the ways emerging computer technologies can empower constructivist learning. Prerequisite: C&T 770. LEC
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This course introduces instructional design theory and production techniques for developing educational technology resources and systems. Students apply their understandings of design and education theories as they work in teams to develop real-world applications of educational technology for specific clients. LEC
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Supervised practice in a media center in selection, classifying, designing, producing, and/or managing instructional materials. Prerequisite: C&T 770 and C&T 871. FLD
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A study of the principles and processes of developing functional educational facilities. Special emphasis placed on the educational planning that precedes and provides the basis for architectural planning. Among topics considered are plant utilization analysis, enrollment projections, site and equipment needs, fiscal and legal constraints, environmental factors, and the development of educational specifications. Designed for both building and central office level administrators. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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A study of the organization and functions of student-teaching programs. Emphasis on the development of effective interpersonal relationships among school administrators, cooperating teachers, university supervisors, and student teachers. Designed for both administrative and instructional personnel. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study. LEC
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An examination of the sources and uses of fiscal resources in education including underlying concepts from economic theory, the impact of values on fiscal policy, state funding formulas, and school budgeting and accounting practices. LEC
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An examination of current trends in personnel evaluation with a focus on clinical supervision and adult development. Students will participate in simulation exercises to develop skills in classroom observation, conferencing techniques, evaluation of teaching artifacts, and the construction of staff development plans. LEC
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A study of children and youth with particular emphasis on demographic characteristics of the population served by schools and implications of those characteristics for schools and schooling. LEC
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Teacher Evaluation is based on clinical, empirical and theoretical information related to effective teacher evaluation behavior from the administrative perspective. It is intended to provide exposure to competencies essential to effective evaluation of teaching performance. Evaluation knowledge, skill and performance are acquired and developed through reading, discussion, active teaching of content related to teacher evaluation and practicing observation, recording and conferencing skills. A variety of approaches is considered, but behaviorally-anchored measurement of teaching behavior is emphasized. Opportunities and needs for improvement are identified with the assistance of video-taped diagnosis of conferencing behavior. Prerequisite: Two of the following: ELPS 750, ELPS 752, ELPS 753, or C&T 840. LEC
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This course focuses on laws that apply to special education. The American legal system, particularly in respect to special education, the constitutional and statutory provisions of federal and state law and the judicial decisions interpreting those laws are reviewed. The course relates equal protection, procedural due process, and substantive due process doctrines to school practices affecting disabled children and examines the sex principles of P.L. 94-142 and similar principles in state legislation. This course is not the equivalent of or a substitute for ELPS 752. (Same as SPED 851.) Prerequisite: SPED 750 or permission of instructor. LEC
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To train students to analyze public policy that affects disabled citizens, various models of analysis are brought to bear on federal policy (education, transportation, housing, institutionalization, protection and advocacy, medical assistance, employment, vocational rehabilitation and others). Not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as SPED 852.) Prerequisite: SPED 851 or SPED 750 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course addresses the issues that professionals (educators, physicians, allied health providers, attorneys and others) and families of disabled people face in the context of public values and attitudes and rules of law. The issues include, without limitation, education, treatment and non-treatment. Not valid for core requirement in history and/or philosophy of education. (Same as SPED 853.) Prerequisite: SPED 750, SPED 851, SPED 852 or permission of instructor. LEC
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An exploration of select areas in philosophy, such as emphasis on value-theory or epistemology or metaphysics, and their implications for educational theory. Normally a limited number of authors will also be selected for monographic treatment. Prerequisite: ELPS 770 or ELPS 771 is recommended. LEC
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An introduction to the foundations of and techniques associated with qualitative research methods. Students will practice interview and participant observation skills and will analyze and interpret data. Additional topics include crafting qualitative research questions, ethics of fieldwork, and establishing trustworthiness of data. Common traditions of qualitative methods employed in education and other related fields will be introduced. LEC
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A survey of the history and development of the community/junior college. Particular emphasis will be given to the student, the faculty, the curricula, administration, and finance. The course is intended to provide a general understanding of the operation and concerns of today's community/junior college for the current or potential community/junior college staff member. LEC
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The purpose of this seminar is to explore leadership in education, particularly higher education, from a variety of perspectives. Readings come from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, such as sociology, organizational behavior, and psychology. We consider various aspects of leadership and analyze the leader from a symbolic perspective, as a manager of meaning and critical change agent. We then challenge ourselves to deconstruct our leadership realities with the help of several critical perspectives as we prepare to examine who the leaders are as well as who they will, and need to, be in the educational organizations of tomorrow. LEC
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The purpose of the course is to acquaint students in higher education, and students from other areas who intend to work in the post-secondary setting, with the history, philosophy and development of higher education in the United States. The course focuses on three periods: 1) the founding of Harvard to 1965; 2) dissent, disruption, and change, 1965-1979; and 3) the future and crucial issues, the 1980's. European higher education and its early influence on higher education in the United States is also examined. LEC
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The characteristics of college students; impact of college on student behavior, changing attitudes, values, beliefs, and the implications of recent research on traditional and new students for instructional and administrative practices. LEC
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Examination of the American college student from societal, development, research, and institutional perspectives and to review the policy implications of these findings for college and university administrators and faculty. Topics include research and theory concerning the college student experience, the diverse nature of the student body and its implications for institutional policy and practice, and formulation of individual philosophies and priorities applicable to working with college students. LEC
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Nature, objectives, and basic procedures of assessment and program evaluation as applied to the various aspects of higher education settings. In addition to basic procedures for evaluating programs, topics covered include accreditation, program review, benchmarking, student outcomes assessment, and evaluation of teaching in colleges and universities. Prerequisite: ELPS 715 or equivalent. LEC
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This course is required as a final course for all master's students in higher education. It is designed to prepare students for professional life after graduation. Using a case study approach, students will examine the reality of practice in a variety of higher educational settings including relevant political and ethical factors. Prerequisite: Higher education students in last semester of master's course work. LEC
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Supervised and directed experiences to enhance the necessary leadership skills of a building/district leaders. Activities will include building/district level resource assessment, data analysis, professional development of teachers/principals (and district level professionals), and cooperative planning with teachers and administrators around responsibilities of curriculum, instruction, resource management and student achievement. Prerequisite: Completion (at the University of Kansas) of all certification program (MS/EdD) requirements for the Building/District Leadership Licenses. FLD
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The on site development of the skills necessary to effectively function as a school building leader. Activities will be tailored to the needs of individual students in consultation with a university adviser and a field adviser. FLD
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The University of Kansas prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, religion, sex, national origin, age, ancestry, disability, status as a veteran, sexual orientation, marital status, parental status, gender identity, gender expression and genetic information in the University’s programs and activities. The following person has been designated to handle inquiries regarding the non-discrimination policies: Director of the Office of Institutional Opportunity and Access, IOA@ku.edu, 1246 W. Campus Road, Room 153A, Lawrence, KS, 66045, (785)864-6414, 711 TTY.