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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Architecture, Design & Planning courses

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Introductory exploration of the process, skills and concepts necessary for successful concept art character design and effective blending of matte painting and film. Drawing will be of primary concern for this course, yet exploring digital means of character development will also be introduced. Prerequisite: ILLU 315. Corequisite: ILLU 415. LAB
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Exploration of thematic illustration through the development of a series of images based on a topic or story. Aspects of continuity, consistency, storytelling, pacing, editing, packaging and a holistic method of developing illustration are addressed. Prerequisite: ILLU 415 and ILLU 425. Corequisite: ILLU 445. LAB
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Continuation in exploration of the process, skills and concepts for successful concept art character design, along with continued development of digital characters and 3D modeling. Prerequisite: ILLU 415 and ILLU 425. Corequisite: ILLU 435. LAB
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Concentrated study in developing skills and techniques with digital media and materials employed in producing basic contemporary animation. (ILLU 415) Development of concept, script, storyboard, and use of audio, music and sound effects are part of this animation experience. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: ILLU 515 and ILLU 445 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Preparation of comprehensive portfolio and consideration of professional requirements encountered by illustrators in the visual communications industry. Participation in the Visual Communications Senior Show is required. Prerequisite: ILLU 435. Corequisite: ILLU 535. LEC
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Visual communication projects with particular development of each student's strengths and interests in illustration. Completed projects constitute a core for a student's portfolio. Contemporary business practices and legal issues will be addressed. Prerequisite: ILLU 525. LAB
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Individual research. RSH
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This course will focus on drawing as a tool of communication through a variety of exercises that explore observation and perception, form and proportion, dimensional illusion and expressive characteristics using a variety of materials and media. This course will also use two- and three-dimensional modeling software necessary for all Industrial Designers. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Design Department. LEC
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Course introduces tools, techniques and processes used in the professional practice of Industrial Design. Learning is through a series of short, focused projects. Techniques in drawing, computer modeling, physical modeling, and presentation are demonstrated and developed. Strategies to improve creativity are explored, while addressing market and production considerations. Prerequisite: BDS 102. LAB
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Course introduces tools, techniques and processes used in the professional practice of Industrial Design. Learning is through a series of short, focused projects. Techniques in drawing, computer modeling, physical modeling, and presentation are demonstrated and developed. Strategies to improve creativity are explored, while addressing market and production considerations. Prerequisite: INDD 284. LAB
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Course combines the study of advanced drawing systems theory with study and practice in visual perception methods, techniques, and media relevant to the fields of industrial design and interior design. Prerequisite: ABDS 212. LAB
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Individual and/or group research projects in one of several specific design areas which will be identified on a semester by semester basis. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Eligibility for INDD 302 (industrial design majors) or permission of instructor. LAB
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Continuation of INDD 284 and 388 but encompassing design problems of greater complexity including group research and problem solving assignments in advanced product and service design. Advanced techniques in problem solving, concept communication, visualization, and overall design expression will be demonstrated and explored. Prerequisite: INDD 388. LAB
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Continuation of Industrial Design studios, projects are longer requiring a high level of demonstrated design ability for successful completion. Issues regarding professional ethics, accountability, and responsibility to public and client are discussed and implemented. Professional design, presentation, and visualization skills will be demonstrated and explored. Finished designs will include full production technical specifications. Prerequisite: INDD 446. LAB
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Experience in industrial design practice gained while working in an internship position within a professional industrial design firm (consulting office or corporate design department). Experience must be gained while working under the guidance of a cooperating, qualified design professional. Details of each internship, e.g., name and location of firm, identity of cooperating professional, length of internship, hours worked each week, nature of work experience, methods to be used in evaluating student performance, etc., must be satisfactorily defined, arranged, and agreed upon jointly by the student, the firm offering the internship, the instructor under which the course is listed, and the industrial design area head prior to the student's enrollment in the course. Prerequisite: INDD 384, INDD 388, INDD 508, INDD 512, INDD 578, INDD 646, INTD 504, and consent as described in the course description. Course may be repeated for credit to earn a maximum total of six semester hours credit applicable toward a degree. FLD
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A study of modern materials, manufacturing processes, and construction methods applicable to the fields of industrial design and interior design. Design analysis of existing products, furniture, building components, and storage systems. Design assignments in furniture, storage systems, and interior space arrangements with emphasis on materials and construction. Field trips to area manufacturing and design facilities. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Introduction to the field of human factors (erogonomics) appropriate to industrial, interior, and visual design. Human capabilities, human-machine interfaces and system properties, and the environment are considered, a micro-computer laboratory is integrated into the course. Open to all university students. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor for non-art and non-design majors. Corequisite: BDS 102. LEC
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Introduction to the study of methods of designing common to industrial, interior, and visual design. Evaluation methods (semantic differential), creativity methods (scenario writing), and task-oriented method: (PERT/CPM) will be considered in relation to design problems. Open to non-design students. Prerequisite and/or Corequisite: INDD 384 or INTD 301 for industrial design majors and interior design majors respectively. Consent of instructor for all other students. LEC
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Work directed toward maximizing the quality and effectiveness of the individual student's professional portfolio. Prerequisite: INDD 448. LEC
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Course requires the accomplishment of a comprehensive, independent research, design, and development project appropriate to the field of industrial design, the depth and complexity of which are commensurate with expectations for entry-level professionals. The nature and scope of the project, as well as details of anticipated accomplishment must be outlined by the student and approved by the instructor prior to the beginning of the second week of classes. This course requires completion of all research, basic problem solving, preliminary design phases of the project, final design development and refinement, detail technical specifications, renderings, physical and computer model building, and a written documented report of the project. Repeatable for credit. Prerequisite: INDD 448. THE
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Similar to INDD 578, Problems in Industrial Design, except as follows: design topic to be selected jointly by student and instructor with content, methodology, and anticipated accomplishment to be outlined by the student and approved by the instructor prior to enrollment in the course; design projects will normally be undertaken by each student on an individual rather than group basis and selected according to his or her needs, strengths, weaknesses, and interests; and students may enroll in up to two sections of same course (3-6 hours) during same semester. Prerequisite: Industrial design majors: completion of fourth-year requirements; or for non-majors, permission of instructor. LAB
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Research-oriented advanced study in industrial design. Prerequisite: Graduate major in industrial design or consent of instructor. RSH
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Prerequisite: INDD 715. RSH
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An introduction to the use of the lens-formed image for visual documentation. Familiarization of the student with the small camera using black and white printmaking processes and materials. Access to a camera having adjustable aperture, speeds, and focus is required. Prerequisite: BDS 101 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Students will become familiar with digital image capture and the digital darkroom. Students will work extensively with color capabilities of Photoshop software and computer driven printing methodologies. Access to a camera compatible with RAW processing applications is required. Prerequisite: BDS 102 or permission of the instructor. LAB
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Students will examine concepts and methods of photographic image capture, management, and delivery using emerging electronic options offered by world wide web communication. Lectures and lab sessions will introduce methodologies for analog-digital and digital-analog conversion of images. Access to any camera having adjustable aperture, shutter speeds, and focus. Prerequisite: Twelve hours of Art and/or Design and permission of instructor. LEC
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Instruction and practice with large format view cameras which are provided. Students will work extensively with principles of creating photographic illustrations in and out of the studio. Methodologies for controlled lighting are presented. In-depth theory and application of color are examined. Access to a small, personal still camera of any type is required. Prerequisite: PHMD 110, PHMD 202 and permission of instructor. LAB
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An introduction to use of the video camcorder, non-linear editing with iMovie and Final Cut Pro, and content development through individual and/or group projects. Students will be encouraged to become more active participants in media through means of analysis, discussion, and writing. Access to a video camcorder of any type is required. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisite or Corequisite: PHMD 202. LAB
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A fundamental course in the handling of incandescent and strobe lighting in a controlled studio setting. Studies are made on color temperature and how different light sources affect surfaces and outcomes. Subject matter will include two dimensional drawings, small objects and portraits. Digital camera using RAW and a 4x5 film camera will be used. Prerequisite: PHMD 222. LAB
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Students will broaden skills acquired in PHMD 302, Video I. Students will develop concepts for planning and production of narrative projects using digital video media and methodologies. Collaborative creative effort and sharing of production responsibilities will be emphasized. Prior basic skills in Final Cut Pro are required. Prerequisite: PHMD 303 and permission of instructor. LAB
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Emphasis is on training in the elements of visual language employed in the interrelated professional fields of editorial, journalistic, and illustrative photographic image production. Individual student projects will be generated, making use of high definition digital printing skills. Prior experience using capabilities of Photoshop and computer driven printing is required. Prerequisite: PHMD 301. LAB
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Exploration of digital/electronic methods using narrative, documentary, and editorial forms. Issues of public need and service oriented learning are addressed. Emphasis is placed on storytelling, documentation, and creative expression. Students are encouraged to generate projects which may make use of the entire spectrum of image/audio/text capture and presentation. Prerequisite: PHMD 203, PHMD 301 and permission of instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHMD 303. LAB
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Diverse choices for preparation, distribution, and delivery of the graduating Photo Media student's portfolio will be emphasized in this course. Expectations in the professional area of their choice will be researched and identified. Students will conduct a comprehensive refinement and display of their creative experience to date. They will develop strategies for best presenting evidence of their capabilities and growth. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Prerequisite or corequisite: PHMD 403. LAB
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A broad introduction to the field of urban planning as a technical profession, a process of decision-making, and a governmental function. The multi-disciplinary nature of planning as an area for professional practice in the geographical, socio-economic and political contexts of the U.S. is stressed. The course is intended for both the student who is considering planning as a major field of study and the student with primary interest in a related field who would like a working knowledge of past and current planning in the U.S. LEC
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Intended for undergraduate individual or group projects/research in an urban planning topic. LEC
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This course examines the evolution of American cities from their European antecedents through the late 20th Century, from the urban planning perspective. It focuses on the changing spatial forms and functions of American cities and how these changes relate to socioeconomic and political aspects of urbanization as well as changes in technology. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the relationships between historical development patterns and the current range of problems facing most U. S. cities. (Same as UBPL 722 but gives undergraduate credit.) LEC
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The course covers a variety of topics within environmental planning. Each topic is examined with respect to the scope of the issues, the methods of analyzing and/or measuring those issues, and the ways planners can address those issues in order to avoid or mitigate environmental problems. LEC
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This course introduces students to the issues that planners and decision makers face as they strive to protect environmental resources, especially within the context of land use planning. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and policy considerations that guide the work of environmental planners. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to investigate the relationships between the American culture and the resulting built and natural landscape. Issues of building types, public places, and land use arrangements will be studied from a socio-historical perspective. (Same as ARCH 662.) LEC
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Designed to meet the needs of students whose study in urban planning cannot be met with the present courses. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. RSH
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An introduction to the concepts and analytical techniques of economics that are most relevant to urban planners. The first part of the course is devoted to microeconomic theory, welfare economics, and the role of the government in the economy. The remainder covers public finance, investment analysis, and methods of determining the allocation of public resources (such as benefit-cost analysis). LEC
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Designed to provide an introduction to the various methods used by the public sector in order to intervene in the housing market. Many different programs are used by governments at all levels to serve many different housing goals. This course will examine many of these programs in an effort to understand what they are supposed to accomplish and how well they work. In all cases, the objective of the course is to train planners so that they have a firm understanding of housing programs that exist now as well as a grasp of the methods used to select housing strategies for implementation by the public sector. LEC
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This course provides a broad overview of local economic development planning. Emphasis is on the role of the practitioner and the various activities that can be pursued to encourage and enhance the economic base of a locality. The objectives of the course are to answer the questions: who are economic development planners; what backgrounds and interests do they have; what types of activities do they perform and initiate to encourage and enhance economic development; and how do they decide upon which activities to pursue? Prerequisite: UBPL 764 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course provides a place-centered approach for understanding and applying the idea of community to local neighborhood planning. The course explores social theories of community and how these have influenced prescriptive models for neighborhood development and design. The course also evaluates the interplay of social, environmental, and economic forces at the neighborhood level and their relationship to community development and well-being. LEC
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The focus of this course is on the social, physical and economic renewal of urban neighborhoods through the collaborative development and implementation of community and neighborhood revitalization plans. The course also will assess the means by which local government can best support community-based initiatives to redevelop urban neighborhoods. Students in the course will develop substantive knowledge of community and neighborhood revitalization techniques as well as applied knowledge on how to engage with a community client and develop a neighborhood revitalization plan. Prerequisite: UBPL 715 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course examines the evolution of American cities from their European antecedents through the late 20th Century, from the urban planning perspective. It focuses on the changing spatial forms and functions of American cities and how these changes relate to socioeconomic and political aspects of urbanization as well as changes in technology. Emphasis is placed on analyzing the relationships between historical development patterns and the current range of problems facing most U. S. cities. (Same as UBPL 522 but gives graduate credit.) LEC
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Introduction to Land Use Planning is a policy course focusing on the principles, context, and underlying assumptions of urban land use planning. It will introduce students to the planning process, what makes great plans, and the major implementation tools for planning (zoning, capital improvement plans, engineering standards, and subdivision regulations). Students will complete a case study of a real life planning process and create a plan for an outlying area of a growing city. LEC
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Site Planning is an essential component of the land development process. This class provides students with an understanding of both site analysis and site design. The site analysis component examines all of the physical, biological, and cultural features that affect land development. The site design component explores principles and techniques for the design of single-family housing, multi-family housing, shopping areas, workplaces, and mixed-use centers, with a focus on how these elements can be fused together to create high-quality neighborhoods, districts, and cities. The course also covers the site plan review process in which proposed projects are evaluated for their compliance with plans and regulations. LEC
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This course explores the legal principles underlying the institutions, practices and processes of city planning. Subjects to be discussed include zoning, eminent domain, subdivision regulation, transfer of development rights, environmental regulation, growth management, and other planning mechanisms used to guide urban growth and control the use of land. Students should emerge from the course with a solid understanding of both the logic and routine practice of planning in a procedural and institutional context. LEC
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The course covers a variety of topics within environmental planning. Each topic is examined with respect to the scope of the issues, the methods of analyzing and/or measuring those issues, and the ways planners can address those issues in order to avoid or mitigate environmental problems. LEC
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This course examines all aspects of growth management including its history, evolution, legal foundations, and application at the national, state, regional, and local level. It covers both theoretical issues and specific techniques such as adequate public facilities standards, impact fees, and urban growth boundaries. Impacts on affordable housing, economic development, social equity, and environmental conservation will also be discussed. LEC
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Introduction to quantitative techniques utilized in planning analysis. Introduction to inferential statistics, computer programming, and the use of statistical packages. LEC
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Advanced study in planning techniques in the areas of population forecasting, analysis of variance, and regression. The course makes extensive use of microcomputers. Prerequisite: UBPL 741 or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course will explore a range of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) applications for students in architecture and planning. It will be structured as a workshop, starting with a review of basic GIS concepts and procedures. Different digital data sources will be explored, along with file sharing (import and export) capabilities. The focus will be on applications at different scales using projects in architecture, site planning, environmental planning, urban analysis, and regional analysis. Three dimensional analysis will also be introduced. Each student will develop a final project as a synthesis of earlier exercises and as an application relevant to their individual professional interests. LEC
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This course is a survey course covering multiple modes of transportation (planes, trains, buses, automobiles, bicycles, and walking). The field of transportation planning is examined within a policy analysis framework. Knowing the policy context and understanding how decisions are made will assist transportation planners in understanding the world in which they operate. In addition to the policy context, this course will focus on the technical knowledge transportation planners are expected to know like federal requirements, traffic modeling, and specific topics like bicycle and pedestrian planning and traffic calming. LEC
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The course is intended to provide a working knowledge of analytical transportation planning; it emphasizes two elements. One emphasis is to describe the fundamental principles of transportation planning through the review of transportation modeling theory and practice. The second emphasis is to work with the TransCad model. Students learn how to use these models by running TransCad (GIS based modeling software), building a transportation model, and using it to forecast future transportation conditions. Prerequisite: UBPL 750 or consent of instructor. LEC
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A variety of transportation implementation methods and strategies are explored. Project management with an emphasis on finance is the major focus of this course. This is a significant responsibility of transportation planners, consisting of several key steps including project initiating, planning, execution, and control. Other techniques included in this course deal with air quality conformity, congestion management, environmental reviews, developing performance measures, scenario testing, highway capacity analysis and micro-simulation modeling, and executing public involvement programs. LEC
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An overview of urban mass transportation in the United States today. Emphasis is on general planning of transit systems rather than details of engineering or hardware. Covers history of urban transit, federal transit programs, comparison of conventional and non-conventional technologies, operations, ridership characteristics, impacts on urban development, and economic, financial, and political issues. LEC
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In addition to studying the history of the preservation movement in the United States, the course will discuss preservation at the state and local level, preservation at the private level, ordinance creation, legal aspects of preservation, technical issues and contemporary issues and controversies in the field of preservation. Projects will deal with philosophic and current issues in preservation. LEC
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This course considers the economic strategies for the historic preservation of the built environment. Topics include investment tax credits, tax increment financing and tax abatement, bond issues, historic preservation grants, and revolving funds. Students will analyze case studies and meet guest speakers who make preservation projects work. Class projects may include market analyses, economic feasibility studies, rehabilitation/redevelopment plans, and technical research papers. LEC
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This course seeks to provide students with both skills and evaluative frameworks to enhance their work as practicing planners. We will focus specifically on issues related to ethics, citizen participation, dispute resolution, and management. Considerable attention will be paid to "real life" lessons. Prerequisite: UBPL 741 and UBPL 815. LEC
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This course is designed to provide a working knowledge of the mechanics of real estate investment analysis. As a planning course, the emphasis is placed upon the process as performed by the practicing planner working with the public sector. This means that the course covers much of the same material that is normally included in a real estate development course in a business school. However, this material is augmented with the study of techniques used to achieve public sector goals. Among the topics covered in the course are: the calculation of return on investment in real estate; the financing of real estate development; the various forms of property ownership; and the implications of tax laws upon the rehabilitation of historic properties and the provision of low-income housing. Prerequisite: Knowledge of spreadsheet software on a personal computer. LEC
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This course introduces students to the issues that planners and decision makers face as they strive to protect environmental resources, especially within the context of land use planning. Emphasis will be placed on the theoretical and policy considerations that guide the work of environmental planners. LEC
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Urban design is studied from the perspective of planning controls. Issues include: aesthetics and zoning, sign regulation, circulation control, administration, finance, downtown revitalization, and historic preservation. LEC
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This course extends the study of real estate development planning begun in UBPL 764: Real Estate Development Planning I. The course will examine various forms of public-private participation in the real estate development process. Advanced study of various public sector programs to guide and direct the real estate development process will be undertaken, including the use of tax credits for affordable housing and for historic preservation. Projects developed within the region will be examined to illustrate the application of these techniques. Prerequisite: Successful completion of UBPL 764 or permission of instructor. LEC
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This course emphasizes the details of successful implementation of environmental plans. While the particular focus (land, water, energy, etc.) may vary, the techniques and processes studied will be broadly applicable. Students will develop environmental plans using real-world data. Prerequisite: UBPL 765, UBPL 738, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This course is intended to afford the opportunity for individual or group projects/research in an urban planning topic. RSH
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Independent study and research related to the master's thesis. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. THE
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The course examines development of the planning function in the United States and the role of planning in the decision-making process. The first part covers the evolution of the planning profession in the past century. The second presents the major alternative theories of the planning process. The third deals with how these theories are applied in practice and the major issues that arise. LEC
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Planners operate within a highly technical yet political environment. Their expertise can be respected, ignored, or distrusted. How can unelected bureaucrats credibly represent the public? Planners often try to bring consensus and action-taking to communities but the very structure of our democracies promotes conflict and stalemate. Understanding how power, structure, and agency influences politics will help planners balance their roles as experts, educators, guides, researchers, and conveners. LEC
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The course explores the forces that shape the structure and function of cities and regions, drawing upon insights from planning, geography, economics, sociology, demography, and political science. Special attention is paid to theories that can be applied by urban planners to improve the economic performance, quality of life, and social equity of urban areas. Topics covered include the origin and development of cities, agglomeration economies, location theory, central place, mix-and-share analysis, economic base, input-output, labor markets, urban models, regional development planning, globalization, high technology, urban poverty, and problems of regional governance. Prerequisite: UBPL 741 and UBPL 815. LEC
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Presentation of fundamental concepts of visual and non-visual communication. Exploration of the structure of visual perception, and of the various theories of visual communication. A special laboratory section will include reproduction skills and procedures which are common to visual communication including the use of the computer. Prerequisite and/or Corequisite: BDS 102. LAB
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Introduces the discipline, function, and tradition of typography as it relates to visual/verbal communication. Emphasis is on interrelationships of letter, word, line and page. Projects examine two-dimensional typographic space, sequence and information hierarchy. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. Corequisite: VISC 204. LAB
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Visual communication problems involving the student in the translation of verbal concepts and design theory into visual images. This course focuses attention on the process of defining problems, gathering information, and formulating clear, powerful, and persuasive visual statements. Introduction to methods of research, idea generation, and image making will be an integral part of this course. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. Corequisite: VISC 202. LAB
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Elements of Typography provides an introduction to the discipline, function and tradition of typography as it relates to visual and verbal communication. Topics to be presented include the historic evolution of typography, the anatomy of typography, syntax and communication, legibility, readability, and technology. Emphasis will be on the interrelationships of letter, work, line and page. Projects will examine type families and their structure, two-dimensional typographic space, language sequence, information hierarchy and typographic aesthetic. Prerequisite: VISC 201 or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Further exploration of typographic form and manipulation of variables which affect content; stresses the importance of typographic composition as an integral component of visual communication design. Projects examine advanced structures of typographic space, work-image structure, and typographic details and aesthetic. Prerequisite: VISC 202, VISC 204, and permission of instructor. Corequisite: VISC 304. LAB
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Exploration of structural systems used in visual organization; grid, proportion, symmetry, sequence, rhythm. Continued exploration of analyzing and creating meaning through semiotics and visual narrative; development of critical thinking and writing skills. Prerequisite: VISC 202, VISC 204, and permission of instructor. Corequisite: VISC 302. LAB
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This introductory course in letterpress printing and book structures will instruct the student in techniques for printing from moveable type and other type-high surfaces, and present the student with a variety of binding styles. These disciplines will be explored from a historic as well as functional perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the acquisition of skills and vocabulary, notation, and creative use of structures and techniques. Prerequisite: VISC 201 and VISC 304. LAB
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Building from the structures and approaches of VISC 302, the course is a research-based examination of non-traditional and expressive uses of the typographic medium. Projects emphasize the student as both content generator as well as designer and include development of word as image and typographic "voice" while further refining technical proficiency. Prerequisite: VISC 302 and VISC 314. Corequisite: VISC 414 and ADS 540. LAB
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Introduces the discipline of designing for dynamic media (i.e., internet, on screen, multi-media). Emphasis will be placed on concept development and on the fundamental principles of information hierarchy, user experience, navigation strategies, site development and site architecture. Projects, lectures and tutorials will provide a working knowledge of current tools and techniques, while exploring the issues of narrative structure, rhythm, space, animation, sound, and video. Prerequisite: VISC 302 and VISC 304. Corequisite: VISC 402. LAB
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Exploration of topics dealing intensively with editorial concept and format organization. Projects stress advanced problems in the integration of text and image through the development of complex and variable structures. Emphasis on thorough researching of content and audience as well as understanding of production/execution implications of solutions. Prerequisite: VISC 402, VISC 404. LAB
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Students will examine methods for synthesizing elements of image, audio, and text, in motion using Adobe After Effects in combination with their required prior experience using iMovie, Final Cut Pro, and Photoshop. Access is required to both still and video cameras having adjustable aperture, shutter speeds, and focus. Prerequisite: BDS 101, BDS 102 and VISC 201 or VISC 304. LAB
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This course will examine core principles and practices of environmental graphic design. Many of these concepts will be concerned with the visual aspects of wayfinding, communicating identity and information, and shaping the idea of place. Some of the topics discussed will include: signage, exhibit design, identity graphics, pictogram design, mapping, civic design and themed environments. Prerequisite: VISC 201 or VISC 304. LEC
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Combines wide range of traditional letterpress and digital processes for type and image for individually determined student book projects. Projects will culminate in a small printed and bound edition. Open to all majors. Prerequisite: BDS 102, VISC 201 or VISC 304, or permission of the instructor. LAB
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Examines how information presented over time conveys or evokes a particular idea or emotion. Using words, type, diagrams, audio and sequencing to restructure messages so that they tell a story that evokes an emotional response. Open to all Design majors. Prerequisite: VISC 201 or VISC 304. LEC
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Making preliminary visualizations, models, and prototypes. Examines words, diagrams, type, and sequencing to restructure messages so that they tell a story more effectively. Editing images to make messages clear, unambiguous and understandable by their intended audience(s). Designing the appearance of an information product so that users can find what they want and understand it when they get there. Open to all Design majors. Prerequisite: VISC 201 or VISC 304 or permission of the instructor. LAB
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Exploration of visual identity problems utilizing a holistic, systems approach to design. Introduces business and design strategies associated with brand development. Emphasis on the methods of thinking and research which precede the making of design as well as the importance of writing to the graphic design profession. Prerequisite: VISC 414. LAB
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Goal-oriented graphic design problem-solving with emphasis on research, analysis, and synthesis of complex visual problems. Will allow for in-depth study of professional design issues and topics; provides a forum for multi-disciplinary collaboration with related professional disciplines. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: VISC 520 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: VISC 530. LAB
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Portfolio reviews and lectures by alumni and area professionals. Preparation of comprehensive online and offline portfolio, business system, and interview preparation. Prerequisite: VISC 520 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: VISC 525. LEC
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This course will provide design and non-design majors instruction in the organization and presentation of a professional quality visual portfolio. Readings, feedback and online collaborations will focus on the development of a focused portfolio consistent with the individual student's pursuits. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. LEC
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A study of different topics in different semesters in a special area of visual communication. Entry by permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit. LAB
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Individual research. RSH
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