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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Architecture, Design & Planning courses

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This is a 5-week course covering an introduction to the design-build method of project delivery, highlighting the role of architect as leader of the design-build team. The course covers team structure; ethical issues; forming a design-build firm; project management; licensing, corporate and insurance issues; public design-build laws and bridging. LEC
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This is a 10-week course covering a more advanced examination of the design-build method of project delivery, highlighting the role of architect as leader of the design-build team. The course covers team structure; ethical issues; forming a design-build firm; project management; licensing, corporate and insurance issues; public design-build laws and bridging; as well as history, architect-as-prime contractor, architect-as-subcontractor, business issues and marketing, bonding, design-build contracts, cost estimating and OSHA, risks and legal liabilities. LEC
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The intent of this five-week course is to provide a forum for the examination of varied aspects of the architect-client relationship. Components of this relationship will be explored both from the point of view of the practicing architect and of the project owner or client. LEC
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The intent of this five week course is to provide a forum for the examination of the wide range of career options that are open to architects. The positive impact, to both the built environment and society as a whole that architects in alternative roles are ideally suited to provide, will be explored. LEC
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This course is designed to develop an understanding of the underpinnings of ethical reasoning including the structure and vocabulary of moral argumentation; apply this knowledge to common ethical issues confounding contemporary architects, demonstrated through presentations and interaction with leading Kansas City architects, interactive analysis of case studies, participatory discussions, reading comprehension and analytical writing. LEC
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This course will introduce the concepts, methods, techniques, and information used by the architect to establish the parameters of a project, prior to entering the formal design process. The content will introduce the core competencies in programming, site, and environmental analysis required by the profession. Programming theory, research techniques, information analysis, evaluation of significance, and creative synthesis of the multivalent factors acting upon the pre-design process of project definition will be covered. Site analyses will include urban places as well as less developed, more rural locations. Exercises may include programming and analysis of projects and sites assigned in the Architectural Design Studio sequence. Prerequisite: ARCH 408 and ARCH 409 or ARCH 505. LEC
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This course will explore eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth-century American landscape design including gardens, estates, rural cemeteries, campuses, suburbs, urban parks, and national parks, as well as the beginnings of landscape architecture as a profession. Topics of inquiry will include European contributions in landscape theory, practice, and aesthetics, and American adaptations in response to climatic, social, and political differences. An important focus will be whether one can look at a designed landscape and see the expression of an attitude toward nature. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to investigate the relationships between the American culture and the resulting built and natural landscape. Issues of building types, public places, and land use arrangements will be studied from a socio-historical perspective. (Same as UBPL 662.) LEC
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The seminar explores the influence of the natural historians Alexander von Humboldt and Charles Darwin on American writings in landscape architecture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The original texts of Humboldt (including Aspects of Nature and Cosmos) and Darwin (including On the Origin of Species and Insectivorous Plants), will be studied in conjunction with significant authors in landscape architecture including A. J. Downing, George Perkins Marsh, Frederick Law Olmsted, Horace William Shaler Cleveland, Mariana Griswold van Rensselaer, Jens Jensen, Garrett Eckbo, Daniel Kiley, and James C. Rose. The emerging ideas of conservation and ecology found in these works will also be examined. LEC
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An exploration of the evolution of cities through the cultural and spatial development of human settlement patterns. The role of cities in the transformations of human culture from tribal communities to post industrial society is defined in terms of the historical origins of urban institutions and functions and their transformation into spatial structure and physical form. LEC
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This course will focus on the application of electronic spreadsheets in the management of project fees, company staffing, and business cash flow. Topics covered include spreadsheet linkage, creation of lookup tables, data consolidation, writing macros and charting results. LEC
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This course focuses on the development of database applications to track the information generated during the normal course of business operations. Topics include database design, table creation, queries, forms, reports, and macros. LEC
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This course uses software packages to manage a simulated design project. The topics in this section include creating tasks and linkages, assigning and managing resources, monitoring a project and creating reports. LEC
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This course covers the use of various software packages in the development of on-screen and hard-copy presentations. Topics include presentation design, importing graphics, output strategies, and communications techniques. LEC
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This course focuses on the use of electronic data communications in operating a design organization. Topics include use of the Internet, electronic research, telecommunication technologies and remote access. LEC
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This course focuses on the development of graphic images. Students are taught to generate vector-based graphics and bit-mapped images that can be incorporated into various software packages. LEC
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The application of Information Technology to Facility Management has changed a formerly basement operation into a center of corporate support. In this course, we explore the use of Computer Aided Facility Management (CAFM) software and its application to real world facility management. LEC
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The main objective of this course is to introduce and inform the student of the processes involved in construction estimating. This course will focus on commercial construction and the fundamentals of estimating a commercial project. This course will acquaint the student with quantity surveying, costing methods, types of estimates, estimating software, the construction estimating process, and estimating the various parts of a project. LEC
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The main objective of this course is to introduce and inform the student of the processes involved in construction project management. This course will focus on commercial construction and the fundamentals of managing a commercial project. The course will acquaint the student with transferring a project from the estimating stage to actual construction, the buyout process, contracts, purchase orders, responsibilities of project managers, responsibilities of superintendents, planning and scheduling, management of changes in a project, financial reporting, accounting processes, payment procedures, and the close-out process in construction. LEC
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This course is intended to be a broad course introducing basis concepts of sustainable design. It will introduce broad outlines of many of the crucial issues facing us in the next few decades. This course identifies how we can re-imagine the relationship between human beings and living systems. The order of the course will begin at a broad overview of our environmental dilemma, then focus upon community issues and end with a close look at green buildings and their systems. This course will include a series of lectures, required reading with written responses, visits to local examples of sustainable buildings and the development of research projects. LEC
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This course explores how a neighborhood is sustainable, or is not. Imbedded in our built landscape are constructs, which once revealed, offer us insight into a community's values and underlying intentions. We will engage neighborhoods in Lawrence, Kansas, and other community neighborhoods. This seminar course will provide a format for discussion and testing observations of patterns in neighborhoods. Our intent will be to describe the detailed patterns for neighborhoods, houses, and gardens, thereby increasing an understanding of how people inform and are informed by their neighborhoods. This course will include a series of lectures, required reading with written responses, visits to a variety of neighborhoods and the development of research projects. LEC
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May be repeated up to a maximum of 9 credits. Students participate in a study abroad program approved by the Architecture Chair. Students will be evaluated upon a submitted journal, sketchbook, or equivalent assignments assigned by the instructor. IND
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Based upon the student's approved proposal, each student will explore the process of creating the built environment by working in a setting that is intended to provide a new perspective for that student. The range of venues may include non-profit organizations, research settings, hands -on building experiences, and other professional settings as approved by the instructor. Students evaluation will include an assessment by the supervisor in the practicum settings as well as on a final paper using appropriate graphics to illustrate key points. Graded on a satisfactory/fail basis. IND
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Students will document their experience in ARCH 690 or another approved study abroad program. This is intended as a critical reflection upon the student's experience and is additional documentation produced beyond the work done for the study abroad credit. The final product will include a written paper, using appropriate graphics to illustrate key points. IND
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This course is about the design of places where people work. The workplace is important for many reasons. Not only do we spend a considerable amount of our waking life there, but our work often becomes one of the central features of our life. In some senses it can be considered to be a homelike activity; people often identify with their work and personalize their workplaces and make them responsive to their daily life needs. Workplaces are also social places where people meet and interact. And, of course they are also places of work, where they must respond to work needs and be conducive to efficient and productive work activities. This course will raise questions about how to design good workplaces. LEC
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Architects design buildings and spaces which they hope will contribute to making significant, enriching, and rewarding places. The quality of places, however, is not identical to the quality of buildings which contribute to them. This course will explore ways in which physical environments, in this case, houses can become and be experienced as rich and embraced homeplaces. It will look at the various processes through which residents, dwellers, designers, real-estate agents, builders, and others are involved with home environments. Implications for design and production processes will be investigated with reference to particular case studies. LEC
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This course explores both theoretical and applied perspectives as to how design at the scales of settlement, neighborhood, building and room enables enhanced quality of life for society's elderly and their families. Discussion will center on readings, case studies and lecture material, with a focus on arriving at a critical understanding of how built fabric choreographs the aging experience. Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent of instructor. LEC
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Individual study of special topics and problems. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. RSH
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This course will examine issues in architectural research. It will provide an overview of graduate level studies with regard to definitions, methods, skills, and techniques. The course will consist of lectures, seminars, readings and guest presentations. The class will enable students to make informed judgments about matters of quality and quantity on architectural issues. Students will be expected to formulate sensible systems of classification for their chosen material. Students will be expected to produce papers and essays, make sample grant applications, and thesis formulations. Prerequisite: Students must be admitted to the 3.5 or 5 year Master of Architecture Professional plan and have successfully completed ARCH 409 or ARCH 608. LEC
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Seminar oriented to the clarification of the thesis or project problem and to the development of the thesis or project proposal. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. RSH
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The object of this course is an intensive examination of the aesthetic problems of perceiving and making quality objects. Students will be expected to engage in a series of short-term, limited scope design exercises and experiments of an architectural nature. LEC
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An introduction to the physics of sound. Objective and subjective evaluation and control of sound as applied to architectural spaces. Room shaping, mechanical and electrical system noise and vibration control, and electro-acoustic sound reinforcement. Prerequisite: PHSX 114 and ARCH 626 or equivalent, or consent of instructor. LEC
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A study of electro-acoustic sound reinforcement and reproduction systems for buildings. Prerequisite: PHSX 212, or consent of instructor. LEC
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This seminar examines the theories and understandings that address the health and well-being outcomes resulting from the complexity of interaction between human beings, their behavior, and designed systems or objects and how this varies across the life course. Environmental stimulation, orientation, control, restoration and their relationship to health outcomes through mediating concepts including stress, place identity and person-environment fit will be addressed. Students will engage in several research/assessment projects through the semester. Participation in class discussion will be an essential component of the class. Prerequisite: Graduate status or consent of the instructor. LEC
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This is a seminar that will focus on the architectural dimensions of health and wellness. The course will investigate the ways the environment contributes to the well being (physical, emotional, spiritual) of people. The history of health care environments will be explored to show how health care environments have evolved to meet changing medical protocols and environmental technologies. A range of contemporary building types will studied, from critical-care hospitals to assisted-living residences and health spas. Students will research bibliographic sources, prepare case studies of existing health and wellness environments and prepare preliminary planning and design proposals for an environment that human well being. LEC
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An introduction to the theory of pattern languages with particular emphasis on the work of Christopher Alexander; analysis of its relationships to other architectural theories; exploration of its implications for architectural practice. LEC
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This seminar will seek analogs in psychology, medicine, biology, anthropology, and other disciplines; analogs that can serve to develop problem-seeking and problem-solving skills in design. Practice sessions in morphological analysis, synectics, bisociation, and triadization will link rigorous research to methods of application. LEC
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This seminar will explore both Western and Eastern concepts of ethics and morality through readings, papers, discussion, and guest speakers. The role of ethics in providing guideposts for social and societal responsibility in design will be developed. LEC
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Seminar concerned with the factors, processes, techniques, and current issues in urban design practice. LEC
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An examination of the relationship between architecture and urban planning through contemporary interpretations of future urban form and the determinants of the location, spatial structure, growth and decline of cities. Foundations for an interdisciplinary synthesis are examined in an attempt to bridge the hiatus between large-scale architectural design and incremental adjustments to urban dynamics. LEC
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A series of seminars on contemporary issues facing the profession. LEC
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These seminars will consist of three to four guest lecturers each semester. All students enrolled in this course will attend the same lecture as ARCH 772. Topics will be selected to reflect major issues covered in the course work, or contemporary issues facing the profession. LEC
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These seminars will consist of three to four guest lecturers each semester. All students enrolled in this course will attend the same lecture with ARCH 771. Topics will be selected to reflect major issues covered in the course work, or contemporary issues facing the profession. This course will be graded Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory. LEC
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This course will focus on the fundamentals of accounting, macroeconomics and the construction industry, and concepts related to the development and implementation of a strategic business plan. LEC
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Topics that will be covered in this course include the organization of a professional practice, personnel management, and the development of effective communication skills. LEC
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This course covers the various procedures involved in managing a CAD system within a design organization. It also explores the different applications and uses of current CAD technology. Topics to be addressed include: selecting a system; billing CAD services; support services and personnel; marketing CAD; customization, file management, menus and script files; AutoLisp Programming; and integrating CAD with other programs. Prerequisite: An introductory CAD class or permission of the instructor. LEC
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Conventional methods for project delivery will be reviewed along with design/build, fast-track, and other techniques. The relationship of the architect and development will also be explored, as will the relationship of project development to urban design concepts. LEC
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The emphasis of this course will be on the development and implementation of a marketing plan, techniques related to the marketing of specific projects, and the relationship of marketing to other components of a firm. LEC
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A course designed to familiarize the student with legal considerations related to professional practice. Case studies and selected readings will serve as the basis for discussion of registration, contracts, business formation, taxes, employment practices, copyright, and patent law. In addition, the course will draw upon the knowledge and experience of members of the professional community. LEC
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Organized field visits and study of selected architectural and urban sites abroad. Pre- and post-travel readings on themes selected to supplement and reinforce thesis or project research or areas of concentration. Students will be expected to maintain a diary and/or sketch book and submit a final paper. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. FLD
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May be repeated for credit up to a total of nine (9) credits. Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent of instructor. IND
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Advanced or experimental courses on specialized topics representing unique or changing needs and resources in the graduate program in architecture. LEC
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A workshop-based course involving approved self and group directed investigations into issues of urban and community design with a focus on problem-setting, discovery and analysis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ARCH 609 and consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LAB
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Continuation of the critical and rigorous investigations into issues of urban and community design with an increasing focus on synthesis and evaluation. Prerequisite: ARCH 801. LAB
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A workshop-based course involving approval self and group directed investigations into issues of design-build and/or materiality with a focus on problem-setting, discovery and analysis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ARCH 609 or ARCH 704 and consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LAB
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Continuation of the critical and rigorous investigations into issues of design-build and/or materiality with an increasing focus on synthesis and evaluation. Prerequisite: ARCH 803. LAB
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A workshop-based course involving approved self and group directed investigations into issues of building technology with a focus on problem-setting, discovery and analysis. Graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ARCH 609 and consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LAB
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Continuation of the critical and rigorous investigations into issues of building technology with an increasing focus on synthesis and evaluation. Prerequisite: ARCH 805. LAB
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A workshop-based course involving approved self and group directed investigations into healthy and sustainable environments with a focus on problem-setting, discovery and analysis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ARCH 609 and consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LAB
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Continuation of the critical and rigorous investigations into healthy and sustainable environments with an increasing focus on synthesis and evaluation. Prerequisite: ARCH 807. LAB
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A workshop-based course involving approved self and group directed investigations into a particular building type with a focus on problem-setting, discovery and analysis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ARCH 609 and consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LAB
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Continuation of the critical and rigorous investigations into a particular building type with an increasing focus on synthesis and evaluation. Prerequisite: ARCH 809. LEC
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A workshop-based course involving approved self and group directed investigations in a particular area of architectural investigation with a focus on problem-setting, discovery and analysis. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ARCH 609 and consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LAB
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Continuation of the critical and rigorous investigations in a particular area of architectural investigation with an increasing focus on synthesis and evaluation. Prerequisite: ARCH 811. LAB
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This seminar investigates the research-based evidence regarding health outcomes at four different levels of dwelling: settlement, institution, home and proximate. Research domains that will be explored include how the urban fabric impacts active living; the role of public parks in urban health; environmental factors on health outcomes in hospitals and workplaces; environmental pathogens in the home; and ergonomic health. Healthy design will be understood as an important variable impacting people's health by: increasing physical activity; reducing injury; improving air and water quality; minimizing environmental degradation; decreasing mental health stresses; and strengthening social fabric. Environmental assessment audits appropriate at various scales as well as space syntax as an analytic tool will be introduced and utilized. Participation in class discussion will be an essential component of the class. The semester will include a problem-based service-learning project requiring application of research in a real-life setting and active student reflection. Prerequisite: Graduate status or consent of the instructor. LEC
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Advanced or experimental courses on specialized topics representing unique or changing needs and resources in the management/practice option. IND
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This course takes the perspective that architectural design is inherently an ethical act. Through this lens, students will learn the essentials of office practices, the many definitions of client and their roles in the design process, the legal responsibilities of the profession, the importance of continuous professional development and the obligation the profession has to provide civic leadership in regard to the built and natural environment. LEC
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Graduate course that investigates current issues in construction technologies and management techniques. LEC
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Independent study, research and project work leading to the submission of a master's thesis or master's project. May be repeated for credit. Note: In some cases a Comprehensive Oral Examination Option may be substituted. Prerequisite: Permission of the Architecture Program Chair. THE
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The purpose of this discussion-based seminar is to explore issues of architectural research from a variety of perspectives. May be repeated up to a maximum of two (2 credits). Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. in Architecture Program or consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LEC
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This course will introduce the doctoral student to the major historical and theoretical foundations of architectural research. Architectural inquiry will be defined from diverse and distinct perspectives, and it will be assumed that buildings should be viewed as physical and cultural artifacts, as elements within larger social, natural and urban contexts, and as products of design and fabrication processes. The course will be a seminar format in which students will contribute to the discussions through independent research and critical analyses of the assigned readings and lectures. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D in Architecture Program or consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LEC
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This course will provide students a foundation in methods of inquiry in researching the built environment. The purpose is to train students in developing research strategies applicable to the areas of design-fabrication processes, dwelling and community, and health and sustainability. Students will be exposed to a variety of methods of inquiry drawn from a number of disciplines. Through critical reading and content analysis, students will consider the value of scholarly research, learn to develop research questions, understand the nature of evidence, and the writing, presentation and illustration of scholarship. The course will be a seminar format in which students will contribute to the discussions through independent research and critical analyses of the assigned readings and lectures. Prerequisite: Admission to the Ph.D. in Architecture Program or consent of the Architecture Program Chair. LEC
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In this course, the students will frame a research question and develop a research proposal. The course is intended to serve as preparation for ARCH 959. Prerequisite: ARCH 931 and ARCH 951. RSH
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This is a research project undertaken and completed under the supervision of the student's major professor. The student designs, executes, and completes a small scale research project and produces a document of publishable quality within his/her area of inquiry. The project is intended to serve as a pilot study leading towards the dissertation. Prerequisite: ARCH 958. RSH
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Individual research work. A minimum of nine credits is required for the degree. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the Comprehensive Oral Examination. THE
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This is a course for all Design Department majors, to introduce them to creative problem solving; and the fundamental of two, three and four-dimensional design. Drawing, photography, 2D and 3D models are used in this course as a means of design thinking to visually represent problems and solutions. Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio-lab per week. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Design Department or receive instructor permission. LEC
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This is a course for all Design Department majors and serves as a continuation of BDS 101 with a greater emphasis on examining the relationships between design and other systems: environment, society and culture, and technology and economics. Two hours of lecture and six hours of studio-lab per week. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Design Department and have completed BDS 101 or equivalent course work, or receive instructor permission. LEC
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This course will focus on drawing as a tool of communication through freehand exercises that explore observation and perception, form and proportion, dimensional illusion and expressive characteristics using a variety of materials and media. Some identified sections of this course will also use two-and three-dimensional modeling software. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Design Department and have completed BDS 101. LEC
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This first interior design studio will introduce the principles and elements of interior design, including design composition, space planning, furniture layout, color, and finish materials. It will also provide the direction and opportunity for the student to apply basic design and drawing skills developed in the Foundations courses to meet project program requirements in a series of projects of increasing complexity. Students will be expected to produce process diagrams, plans, elevations, models and finish boards. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. Corequisite: ARCH 103 and BDS 212. LAB
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The study of the production, manufacture, and characteristics of the important textile fibers. The construction and testing of fabrics. Demonstrations and studio work to accompany study. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. LEC
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Introduction to the principles and elements of interior design will continue with emphasis on diagramming, spatial organization, detailing, presentation techniques, and documentation methods. Students will research furniture systems, furnishings and equipment for large and/or complex interior design projects in new and/or old buildings. They will apply the principles of environmentally responsible design in interior design projects. Prerequisite: ENVD 200 and BDS 212. LAB
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Students will study the visual qualities, technical characteristics, and applications of building materials, room and furniture finishes in interior installations. This course will provide an overview of the building, health, life and safety codes, the maintenance and life cost. Class will be structured around lectures, guest speakers, and field trips to construction sites, factories, and design facilities. Prerequisite: ENVD 200. LEC
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This course will focus on drawing as a tool of communication through freehand exercises that explore observation and perception, form and proportion, dimensional illusion and expressive characteristics using a variety of materials and media as they relate to environments. This course will use two- and three- dimensional software specific to Environmental Interior design pursuits. Prerequisite: Must be admitted into the Environmental/Interior program and have completed BDS 102, and be co-enrolled in the ENVD 200 studio course. LEC
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Planning and design of small to medium size commercial interiors. Studying the organization and utilization of spaces as affected by the needs of the client and the architectural concepts of the structure. Project experiences focus on development of specialized spaces in retailing, health care, hospitality, businesses: selection of furniture and furnishings; the development of custom design casework and millwork. Prerequisite: ENVD 200 and ENVD 202. Corequisite: ARCH 531. LAB
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Examining and analyzing essential information necessary to determine the clients' present and future operational requirements and the space, facilities, and services required for support. Establishing pre-planning concepts and guidelines on building and space utilization. Effort is directed toward developing space into a functional, flexible, and aesthetic environment in which to work. Study includes the use of questionnaires, organization charts, space study and standards, space projections, space tabulations, and space distribution using interaction, blocking, and layering diagrams. Prerequisite: ENVD 200, ENVD 202, EECS 128 and MATH 101. LAB
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Investigations and explorations of work space strategies of large scale corporate offices that include conventional, open office, alternative officing or related strategies. Assignment is usually based on a typical floor of a high rise building that ranges between 15,000 to 20,000 square feet of interior space. Planning effort focuses on developing the most compatible circulation flow within the building both internally and externally. Attention will be placed on building feasibility study and achieve building and ADA codes compliances. Other experiences include research and selection of furniture systems based on understanding of furniture system types, hardware, assemblies, lighting, power and communication capabilities. Prerequisite: ENVD 304. LAB
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Research and specifications of interior materials and furniture. Awareness of professional and product liabilities as well as federal, state, and local government regulations and standards. Emphasis on quality control using performance and system approach, fire performance testing and life cycle casting as methods of evaluating materials and providing a basis for making responsible decisions. Exercises on working drawings and schedules. Prerequisite: ENVD 304 for interior and industrial design majors. Consent of instructor for all other students. LAB
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This class provides individual students with the opportunity to develop a project of choice based on their interests, design philosophy and builds on the skills acquired from previous semester. Students will conduct in-depth research that may include office planning, retail, sustainability, health care, accessibility, hospitality, exhibit, lighting applications, interior products and technologies. Focus will be on the investigation of a component within a large or complex project, and the development of details, applicable codes and standards, materials and technologies. The nature, scope, and level of complexity of the problem must be prepared in advance by the student prior to the start of the semester and submit in writing to the instructor within the first week of the class. Prerequisite: ENVD 304 and ENVD 306. THE
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This course covers sustainability issues for architecture and interior design. The class focuses on subject matters dealing with the various agencies and organizations of sustainable issues, materials, resources, and building practices/processes/systems that support sustainable design. The course will include lectures, guest speakers, and presentations. Students will be required to produce research, make presentations, papers and a small scale project. In some cases students may work in teams on specific projects. Prerequisite: Open to all University of Kansas students of junior level or higher with permission, but priority will be given to Environmental Design/Interior Design students. LEC
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A continuation of ENVD 408, that will deal with advanced design issues in contract interior design that may include contract documents and budgeting. Prerequisite: ENVD 304, ENVD 306, and ENVD 408. THE
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Lectures by faculty members and guest speakers will introduce the common situations associated with professional interior design practice, including office organization, contracts, procurement and billing procedures, fees, marketing and sales effort, public relations, professional ethics, and environmental ethics in the practice of interior design. Prerequisite: ENVD 307. LEC
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An individual review of the student's portfolio. Topics in presentation techniques, materials, and organization of content will be discussed as related to individual student needs. Prerequisite: ENVD 306. Corequisite: ENVD 408. LAB
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An internship program available to qualified fifth year students. Students will work full-time in an acceptable professional office. Prerequisite: Completion of fourth year requirement and permission of area faculty. FLD
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Individual research. Prerequisite: INTD 606 or equivalent. RSH
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Continuation of INTD 715. RSH
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Exploration of problems in drawing for various reproduction processes. Emphasis on perspective, head drawing, the clothed and nude figure, nature illustration, perspective, and environments. Various drawing media and materials are explored. Required for Illustration majors as a pre-review course. Prerequisite: BDS 101. LAB
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Concentrated study in developing methodologies for producing contemporary illustration. Emphasis is placed on concept development, composition exploration, value and color studies, and reference creation. Required for Illustration majors as a pre-review course. Prerequisite: BDS 101 and BDS 102. LAB
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Concentrated study in developing skills and techniques with media and materials that are employed in producing contemporary illustration. Continued emphasis on methods of research and idea generation as in VISC 204. Prerequisite: ILLU 305 and permission of instructor. Corequisite: ILLU 405. LAB
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Continued exploration of problems in drawing and painting for various reproduction processes. Emphasis on color, head drawing, perspective, the clothed and nude figure, environments, and nature illustration. Various drawing, painting, collage and digital media and materials are explored. Prerequisite: ILLU 205 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: ILLU 315 or permission of instructor. LAB
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Concentrated study of different forms of concepts for illustration. Continued development of technical skills and visual literacy are also addressed. Prerequisite: ILLU 305 and ILLU 315. LAB
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