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Principal Course Distribution Requirement

Principal courses offer introductions to the breadth of disciplines in the College. They acquaint students with the subject matter in an area, with the types of questions that are asked about that subject matter, with the knowledge that has been developed and is now basic to the area, and with the methods and standards by which claims to truth are judged.

Students must complete courses in topical groups in three major divisions (humanities, natural sciences and mathematics, and social sciences). For the B.A., three courses are required from each division, with no more than one course from any topical group. The B.G.S. requires two courses from each division, with no more than one from any topical group. To fulfill the requirement, a course must be designated as a principal course according to the codes listed below.

These are the major divisions, their topical subgroups, and the codes that identify them:

Humanities

  • HT: Historical studies
  • HL: Literature and the arts
  • HR: Philosophy and religion

Natural Sciences and Mathematics

  • NB: Biological sciences
  • NE: Earth sciences
  • NM: Mathematical sciences
  • NP: Physical science

Social Sciences

  • SC: Culture and society
  • SI: Individual behavior
  • SF: Public affairs

No course may fulfill both a principal course distribution requirement and a non-Western culture or second-level mathematics course requirement. Laboratory science courses designated as principal courses may fulfill both the laboratory science requirement and one of the distribution requirements. No free-standing laboratory course may by itself fulfill either the laboratory science requirement or a principal course requirement. Students should begin taking principal courses early in their academic careers. An honors equivalent of a principal course may fulfill a principal course requirement.

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Non-Western Culture Requirement

A non-Western culture course acquaints students with the culture, society, and values of a non-Western people, for example, from Asia, the Pacific Islands, the Middle East, or Africa. Students must complete one approved non-Western culture course.

One approved non-Western culture course is required. Occasionally courses with varying topics fulfill the non-Western culture course requirement. See the Schedule of Classes for details. These courses are coded NW.

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Transfer and Earned Credit Course Codes

These codes are used to evaluate transfer credit and to determine which academic requirements a course meets.

  • H: Humanities
  • N: Natural Sciences and Mathematics
  • S: Social Sciences
  • W: World Civilization and Culture
  • U: Undesignated Elective Credit (course does not satisfy distribution requirement)

All Engineering courses

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This course covers: legal doctrines relating to owners, design professionals, and contractors; sources of law, forms of association, and agency; contracts, including formation, rights and duties, interpretation, performance problems, disputes, and claims; standards of care and the management of construction claims; duties and obligations of the design professional, the owner, and the contractor; surety bonds and insurance. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in engineering or architecture. LEC
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Includes planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling design projects. Treats those topics from viewpoints of profit, cost control, client satisfaction, and project team human relations. Also covers delegation, motivation, team building, performance reviews, conflict resolution, and group dynamics. Presents the project manager's job from an augmented model of the Blake-Mouton grid. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in engineering or architecture. LEC
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The elements of the accounting cycle are defined so as to help the student understand the process from the balance sheet for the last period through the journal, ledger, income statement, trial balance and an adjusted balance for the current period. There is a heavy emphasis on the definition and significance of accounting terminology. The communication interfaces between engineering managers and the controller's office are examined as are recent developments in cost accounting. Prerequisite: Admission to graduate study in architectural, construction, engineering or technology management, or permission of instructor. LEC
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A study of the economic feasibility of competing engineering projects including the application of break-even analysis, decisions under uncertainty, decision trees, stochastic models, risk vs. return, and forecasting. A study of the financial figures of merit used to evaluate competing engineering projects including the DuPont rate of return method, the accounting rate of return, the operating return method, return on equity, earnings per share, margin on sales, selling price of stock, corporate credit rating, total sales, market share, market entry, and proforma year-end statements. A study of the strategic evaluation of a project including the proposed product or service, the organization, the environment, and the venture in general. Prerequisite: Admission to the M.S. Engineering Management program or consent of instructor, EMGT 806, a course in applied statistics. LEC
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The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to all aspects of managing a project within a company or organization. The entire project life cycle will be covered from inception to close-out, and many practical considerations will be discussed including material procurement, working with contractors and consultants, selecting software, and managing the project team. The course will focus on how to manage project scope, schedule budget, and resources using personal computer software. A semester project is required presenting an example of project management or investigating some aspect of project management in detail. LEC
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Basic principles of marketing as applicable to engineering managers in the production- or operations-based enterprise. Includes a broad overview of the major components of marketing (competition, product, price, promotion, and distribution). Also details the integration of those components into the marketing plan. The students will develop a group marketing plan for an agreed-upon product. Prerequisite: Admission to a graduate program in engineering or Pittsburgh State's technology management program. LEC
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A capstone course for the program which provides an integration of the material presented in the other courses through the utilization of several engineering management case studies. Prerequisite: Completion of a minimum of 21 credit hours in the Engineering Management program. LEC
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A problem in engineering management, the satisfactory completion of which satisfies the project requirement for the degree of Master of Science in Engineering Management. THE
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This is a first course at the graduate level introducing the formal methods and processes in bringing complex systems into being and improving existing systems. Systems include both products and services. Emphasis is placed on: the definition of customer needs, the entire life cycle of systems, and introduction to formal specification methods, the value to cost ratio and the management of the systems engineering process. LEC
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This course investigates the area of managing software development and presents the management process as a means of optimizing business considerations and project demands. Uncertainties in product/service specifications, technology risks, cost and delivery requirements impact the management functions. Cost and schedule estimation techniques are presented together with project planning, risk control and measurement technologies. The techniques presented in this course are directly applicable to management in other industry segments. Guest speakers are used to demonstrate applications in this course. LEC
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This course is intended to bring the student up to date on developments in the field of information technology (IT) and to prepare the student to apply those technologies in the workplace. To this end, the course is divided into two components. First, current hardware, software, and networking technologies will be presented. Topics include relational databases, object oriented design and programming, client-server technologies, the Internet, and emerging communication technologies. Second, approaches to evaluating and implementing the range of information technology alternatives available to business will be presented. Topics in this area include software development, management and evaluation, IT project management, information integrity and security, and the effects of IT on people and the organization. LEC
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This course provides a survey of the environmental regulations, environmental problems, and environmental solutions that must be dealt with by engineering managers regardless of their function or industry. A historical perspective on the environment is presented followed by discussion of pollution generation (sources), transportation, fate, and effects. The quantity and quality of various types of pollutants emitted to various media and the risk posed by these pollutants is analyzed. The regulatory process is examined from the perspective of the legislator, the regulator, the regulated, the engineer, and the public. LEC
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Management of competitive intelligence and security in business strategic planning is a first course at the graduate level that introduces the formal methods, concepts, and processes of competitive intelligence and security which are vital to both strategic business planning and day-to-day business operations. This course provides access to the tools used to identify what is happening in the business environment including legislation, economics, regulatory changes, competition, customers, etc. that affect a business' strategy and operations. Further, these tools are applied to determining what will likely happen in the future and how to use those forecasts to optimize strategic and operational plans. LEC
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Graduate-level investigation requiring original, independent research on problems or subjects of immediate interest to a student or faculty member. Intended to develop a student's capability in coordinating two or more of the following: technology, finance, economics, applied mathematics, and managerial communication. EMGT 860 may be repeated for credit to a maximum of four hours in the degree program. Prerequisite: Approval of an outline of the proposed project by the instructor and the program director. RSH
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This course develops the rationale and need for the integration of manufacturing systems, and deals with the multitude of practical problems involved with manufacturing systems integration. Topics covered include intelligent manufacturing subsystems and vendor-specific islands of automation, on-line and off-line information sources, and end users of information in the manufacturing enterprise. Engineering details covered include the types of communication links available between systems, communication standards, network and protocol alternatives, and hardware platform alternatives. Management concepts covered include the top-down design/bottom-up implementation approach to system integration, long-range planning and management of integration projects, reliability and security issues, and human factors. LEC
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This course provides the student with up-to-date information of the management of manufacturing operations. Emphasis is on quantitative methods for designing and analyzing manufacturing processes, simulation of manufacturing processes, and recent paradigms in manufacturing including just-in-time production, synchronous manufacturing, and agile manufacturing. A semester project is required covering some aspect of operations management in detail. LEC
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This course will provide an introduction to the University and School of Engineering community and the value and role of higher education in our society, strategies for successful transition to and participation in that community, exploration of the University and School commitment to diversity and multiculturalism, and information about University and School resources and procedures. Prerequisite: Eligible students must have fewer than thirty credit hours from the University of Kansas. LEC
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An introductory level course with emphasis on engineering problem definition, methods simulation, and solution, including approaches to engineering design; engineering units and terminology; engineering disciplines and career areas, and engineering code of ethics. LEC
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The concept of weapons systems and the systems approach are explored. The techniques of linear analysis of ballistics and weapons are introduced. The dynamics of the basic components of weapons control systems are investigated and stated as transfer functions. This course provides the tools for the future development in the student's understanding of the basic principles that underlie all modern naval weapons systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as NAVY 180.) Prerequisite: MATH 002. LEC
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The concept of weapons systems and the systems approach are explored. The techniques of linear analysis of ballistics and weapons are introduced. The dynamics of the basic components of weapons control systems are investigated and stated as transfer functions. This course provides the tools for the future development in the student's understanding of the basic principles that underlie all modern naval weapons systems. Approved for degree credit in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences effective Fall 1971. Such courses count within the limit of 25 hours accepted from other schools and divisions. (Same as NAVY 184.) LEC
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Engineering work experience with a recognized engineering organization. The work must be professional in nature and not merely routine. A final summary report must be submitted to the student's major department at the conclusion of each continuous period of employment and may cover more than one sequential semester or summer session. Credit for this course cannot be used toward graduation requirements. Prerequisite: Permission of major department. FLD
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First semester juniors. Three hours classroom and two and one-half hours laboratory per week. A comprehensive study of the theory, principles, and procedures of ship navigation in coastal and open ocean environment. Includes piloting, triangulation, ocean and tidal currents, navigational astronomy, spherical trigonometry, sight reduction, publications and logs; an introduction to electronic navigation, including theory of wave propagation, hyperbolic and azimuthal systems, doppler, inertial, and satellite systems. (Same as NAVY 300.) LEC
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An examination of the role of technology and its influence on society. The historical development of technology will be traced up to modern times with an emphasis on its relations to the humanities. Attention will be given to the future of different branches of technology and alternative programs for their implementation. (Same as HIST 404.) LEC
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Second semester juniors. Three hours classroom and two and one-half hours laboratory per week. A study of laws for the prevention of ship collisions; tactical formations and dispositions, relative motion, and maneuvering board. Major portion of the semester is devoted to operations research and analysis, with an introduction to discrete probability theory, game theory, measures of effectiveness, active and passive sonar equations, and review of systems analysis and cost effectiveness. (Same as NAVY 304.) Prerequisite: MATH 111 or higher. LEC
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Courses on special topics of current interest to engineers, such as ethics, engineering economics, engineering practice, communications, teamwork, and professional and career development. Prerequisite: Approval of the instructor. FLD
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Engineering internship in an approved company. Internship hours do not satisfy any course requirements for a bachelors degree in any School of Engineering major, but will appear on the transcript. Credit assigned after review of report on internship experience. FLD
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The process of planning, organizing, initiating, drafting, and editing engineering documents is covered through writing assignments and discussion. Writing, editing, and publishing the Kansas Engineer magazine. Graded on satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. Prerequisite: ENGL 102. FLD
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Meets one hour per week. Planning, preparing, and presenting speeches on a variety of topics throughout the semester. Includes preparing speeches, spontaneous speeches and the evaluation of speeches by other students. Prerequisite: Two English courses and at least junior or senior standing in engineering or consent of instructor. FLD
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A design problem or system study satisfying the project requirement for the Master of Engineering degree. THE
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A major design problem or system study satisfying the project requirement for the Doctor of Engineering degree. THE
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This course is for students seeking Departmental Honors in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. At the completion of the required four hours of total enrollment, a written and oral report of the research is required. (Same as PHSX 501.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics. IND
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This course is for students seeking to fulfill the undergraduate research requirement. Students are expected to participate in some area of ongoing research in the department, chosen with the help of their adviser. At the end of the term, students will present their results in a seminar to other students and faculty. (Same as ASTR 503 and PHSX 503.) Prerequisite: Junior/Senior standing in Astronomy, Engineering Physics, or Physics, or permission of instructor. IND
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An introduction to quantum mechanics, emphasizing a physical overview. Topics should include the formalisms of non-relativistic quantum mechanics, the 3-dimensional Schrodinger equation with applications to the hydrogen atom; spin and angular momentum; multi-particle systems of Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein particles; time-independent perturbation theory. (Same as PHSX 511.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 290. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing experimental techniques and data analysis, as well as scientific writing and presentation skills. Experiments will explore a range of classical and modern physics topics. (Same as PHSX 516.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, EPHX 316, and EPHX 521. (EPHX 521 may be taken concurrently.) LAB
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Applications of modern mathematical methods to problems in mechanics and modern physics. Techniques include application of partial differential equations and complex variables to classical field problems in continuous mechanics, unstable and chaotic systems, electrodynamics, hydrodynamics, and heat flow. Applications of elementary transformation theory and group theory, probability and statistics, and nonlinear analysis to selected problems in modern physics as well as to graphical representation of experimental data. Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320 or permission of instructor. (Same as PHSX 518.) LEC
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Newton's laws of motion. Motion of a particle in one, two, and three dimensions. Motion of a system of particles. Moving coordinate systems. (Same as PHSX 521.) Prerequisite: PHSX 211 or PHSX 213, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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The properties of electric and magnetic fields, including electrostatics, Gauss' Law, boundary value methods, electric fields in matter, electromagnetic induction, magnetic fields in matter, the properties of electric and magnetic dipoles and of dielectric and magnetic materials. (Same as PHSX 531.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, PHSX 521 or special permission, MATH 223, MATH 290 and MATH 220 or MATH 320. LEC
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A laboratory course that explores the theory and experimental techniques of analog and digital electronic circuit design and measurements. Topics include transient response, transmission lines, transistors, operational amplifiers, and digital logic. (Same as PHSX 536.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223 and MATH 290. PHSX 313 and 316 recommended. LEC
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Different topics will be covered as needed. This course will address topics in physics and astrophysics not covered in regularly offered courses. May be repeated if topic differs. (Same as PHSX 600.) Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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A laboratory course emphasizing the application of physical principles to the design of systems for research, monitoring, or control. Topics include the use of microcomputers as controllers, interfacing microcomputers with measurement devices, and use of approximations and/or computer simulation to optimize design parameters, linear control systems, and noise. (Same as PHSX 601.) Prerequisite: Twelve hours of junior-senior credit in physics or engineering, including one laboratory course. LEC
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An introduction to the use of numerical methods in the solution of problems in physics for which simplifications allowing closed-form solutions are not applicable. Examples are drawn from mechanics, electricity, magnetism, thermodynamics, and optics. (Same as PHSX 615.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313, MATH 320 or equivalent, and EECS 138 or equivalent. LEC
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Continuation of PHSX 521. Lagrange's equations and generalized coordinates. Mechanics of continuous media. Tensor algebra and rotation of a rigid body. Special relativity and relativistic dynamics. (Same as PHSX 621.) Prerequisite: EPHX 521 or PHSX 521. LEC
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An introduction to basic fluid mechanics in which fundamental concepts and equations will be covered. Topics will include hydrostatics, hydrodynamics, wave propagation in fluids, and applications in the areas such as astrophysics, atmospheric physics, and geophysics. (Same as PHSX 623.) Prerequisite: PHSX 212 or PHSX 214, MATH 223, and MATH 290. LEC
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Maxwell's equations, wave propagation, optics and waveguides, radiation, relativistic transformations of fields and sources, use of covariance, and invariance of relativity. Normally a continuation of PHSX 531. (Same as PHSX 631.) Prerequisite: EPHX 531 or PHSX 531. LEC
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Experimental methods in nuclear physics, elementary concepts and simple considerations about nuclear forces, alpha and beta decay, gamma radiation, nuclear structure, and reaction systematics. (Same as PHSX 641.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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Geometric optics. Wave properties of light: interference, diffraction, coherence. Propagation of light through matter. Selected topics in modern optics, e.g., lasers, fibers. (Same as PHSX 655.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 316. LEC
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Properties and interactions of quarks, leptons, and other elementary particles; symmetry principles and conservation laws; broken symmetry; gauge bosons; the fundamental interactions, grand unified theories of strong, electromagnetic, and weak interactions; the cosmological implications of elementary particle physics. (Same as PHSX 661.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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Development of thermodynamics from statistical considerations. Elementary techniques of calculating thermodynamic properties of systems. Application to classical problems of thermodynamics. Elementary kinetic theory of transport processes. Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein systems. (Same as PHSX 671.) Prerequisite: EPHX 611. LEC
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Properties of common types of crystals and amorphous solids. Lattice vibrations and thermal properties of solids. Electrons and holes in energy bands of metals, semiconductors, superconductors, and insulators. (Same as PHSX 681.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and PHSX 611. LEC
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An introduction to radiation processes, thermal processes, and radiative transfer in stellar atmospheres and the interstellar medium. (Same as ASTR 691 and PHSX 691.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 or consent of instructor. LEC
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An overview of topics relevant to gravitation and modern cosmology: special relativity, tensor notation, the equivalence principle, the Schwarzchild solution, black holes, and Friedmann models. Cosmic black body radiation, dark matter, and the formation of large-scale structure. The idea of quantum gravity and an introduction to the current literature in cosmology. (Same as PHSX 693.) Prerequisite: PHSX 313 and MATH 320. LEC
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The principles of statics, with particular attention to engineering applications. Prerequisite: PHSX 211. LEC
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Digital computing methods for solving mechanical engineering problems utilizing current programming languages and commercial software. Co-requisite: MATH 116 or MATH 121. LEC
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Introduction to graphics programs, introduction to computer aided design, familiarization with computer graphics hardware and software. LEC
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An introductory course on materials. Emphasis is placed on structure and the relation of structure to the behavior and properties of engineering materials. Prerequisite: CHEM 150 or CHEM 184 or consent of instructor. LEC
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Laboratory to supplement lecture on engineering materials properties and selection, manufacturing processes, and design for manufacturing. Prerequisite: CHEM 150 or CHEM 184. Corequisite: ME 306 and ME 311. LAB
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A basic treatment of stress and deformation in elastic bodies. Prerequisite: ME 201 and MATH 220. LEC
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An introduction to the concepts of heat, work, the first and second laws of thermodynamics and equations of state. These concepts are applied to flow and nonflow systems including power and refrigeration cycles. Prerequisite: PHSX 211. Corequisite: MATH 122. LEC
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Kinematics and kinetics of particles and of rigid bodies as applied to mechanical engineering problems. Introduction to mechanical vibration. Prerequisite: ME 201, MATH 220 and MATH 290. LEC
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An analytical or experimental study of problems or subjects of immediate interest to a student and faculty member and which is intended to develop student capability for independent research or application of engineering science and technology. After completion of the project, a report is required. Maximum credit is three hours. Not open to students who have taken ME 361. Prerequisite: Approval of an outline of the proposed project by the instructor and department chair. IND
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Investigation of a particular mechanical engineering problem. Research will involve defining the problem, developing a research methodology, applying the research methodology and gathering data, analyzing and interpreting the data, and presenting the results of the research. The student must have a faculty sponsor and submit a proposal in writing stating the objective of the research, the planned research method that will be used, and the method of reporting the results. Maximum credit is three hours. Not open to students who have taken ME 360. Prerequisite: Participation in the University Honors Program, consent of instructor, and approval of the chair required. IND
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Courses on special topics of current interest in mechanical engineering, given as the need arises. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. LEC
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Application of the principles of thermodynamics to the analysis and design of thermal systems. Prerequisite: ME 312. LEC
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Kinematic design and analysis of mechanisms composed of linkages, cams, and gears. Prerequisite: PHSX 211. LEC
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Lectures and laboratories on the basics of measurement, instrumentation, data acquisition, analysis, design and execution of experiments, and written and oral reports. Topics selected from heat transfer, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, mechanics, strength of materials, and dynamics. Prerequisite: ME 208, ME 311, and Statistics. Co-requisite: EECS 318, ME 510, ME 520 and ME 612. LEC
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The design process of a mechanical or thermal system. Establishment of specifications and consideration of realistic constraints such as safety, codes, economic factors, reliability, oral and written communications, and other factors as they impact the design process. Prerequisite: ME 228, ME 307, ME 311, and ME 312. LEC
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Introduction to numerical methods for solution of mechanical engineering problems by use of digital computers. Prerequisite: ME 208 or equivalent, MATH 220 and MATH 290. LEC
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An introduction to the mechanics of fluid flow. The principles of conservation of mass, momentum, and energy are developed in differential and integral form. Laws of dimensional analysis and similitude are presented as the basis for empirical correlations. Engineering applications include: calculation of hydrostatic forces on submerged objects, analysis of flow and pressure loss in piping systems, estimation of aerodynamic lift and drag, and performance characteristics of pumps and fans. Prerequisite: ME 201 and ME 312 or equivalents. LEC
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An introduction to thermodynamics, fluid dynamics and heat transfer for non-majors. This course may not be used to satisfy Mechanical Engineering requirements. Prerequisite: PHSX 211 and MATH 220. LEC
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Kinetic design and analysis of mechanisms. Mechanical vibration. Prerequisite: ME 420, ME 201, MATH 220, and MATH 290. LEC
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Design of mechanical components and systems. Prerequisite: ME 311. LEC
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Courses on special topics of current interest in mechanical engineering, given as the need arises. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. IND
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An applied study of conductive, convective, and radiative heat transfer mechanisms in solid and fluid systems. Engineering applications include solid conduction, free and forced convection in fluids, thermal radiation and heat exchangers, evaporators, and furnaces. Prerequisite: MATH 220 and ME 312. Corequisite: ME 510. LEC
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Basic concepts of automotive design and manufacture. Primary focus of course on vehicle design and performance. Design is subdivided into vehicle components of frame, suspension, front and rear axle, steering power train, front and rear wheel drive, and braking. Integration of these ideas into a vehicle design project with analysis of its performance culminates the course. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Design of mechanical components and systems. Corequisite: ME 520 and ME 528. LEC
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Provides an overview of musculoskeletal anatomy. Linear and angular dynamics of human movement, energy expenditure, and power required to perform a given activity. Two-dimensional joint forces and torques from kinematic data for body segments and force plate data. Tissue properties, appropriate constitutive models and determination of stresses and strains in tissues and structures under normal loading conditions. Students will select and work on biomechanics design projects or independent study projects. Prerequisite: ME 311 and ME 520 or equivalent. LEC
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Study and analysis of internal combustion engine physical phenomena dynamic function, components, and system design. Emphasis on spark ignition and compression ignition engine analysis. Performance, current technology, thermodynamics, fluid-mechanics, combustion products and pollution, fuels and lubrication, and mechanical design. Prerequisite: ME 412. LEC
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A study of steam power plant equipment including thermodynamic analysis, design and performance of modern steam generators, prime movers, and auxiliaries. Prerequisite: ME 412 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Planning for a capstone design project. Development of a formal project proposal is required. Must be used with two credit hours of ME 641 or ME 644 in the subsequent semester to complete the capstone design requirements. Prerequisite: Approval of instructor. LEC
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Design and development of a mechanical or thermal/fluid system. An individual or group report that includes designs, analysis/testing, drawings, and/or schematics is required. Establishment of specifications and consideration of realistic constraints such as safety, economic factors, design impact, aesthetics, and reliability are required. Prerequisite: ME 455, ME 501, and ME 628. LEC
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Manufacturing and testing of a mechanical system designed and developed in ME 627 - Vehicle Design. A group report with individual assignments which details the manufacturing procedures and testing procedures and results is required. A completed, working project with a design file documenting all aspects of the project development must be submitted. Prerequisite: ME 627, ME 501 and ME 628. Corequisite: ME 412 and ME 455. LEC
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Design and development of a mechanical system related to biomechanics that has been investigated in ME 633 - Basic Tissue Mechanics and Biodynamics. An individual or group report that includes designs, analysis/testing, and drawings and/or schematics is required. Establishment of specifications and consideration of realistic constraints such as safety, economic factors, design impact, aesthetics, and reliability are required. Prerequisite: ME 501, ME 628, and ME 633. Co-requisite: ME 455. LEC
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Design and development of a thermal or fluid system. A group report that includes design, analysis/testing, drawings, and/or schematics is required. Establishment of specifications and consideration of realistic constraints such as safety, economic factors, design impact, aesthetics, and reliability are required. Prerequisite: ME 412, ME 455, and ME 501. Corequisite: ME 628. LEC
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Design and development of a mechanical or thermal/fluid system related to an ultra high fuel economy (around 500 miles per gallon), non-traditional automotive vehicle. Control and simulation efforts required to maximize performance as a function of low speed vehicle operation. Establishment of specifications and consideration of realistic constraints such as powertrain efficiency, engine/motor performance, safety, ergonomies, environmental and societal importance, design impact on fuel economy, reliability and experimental error are required. An individual or group report that includes designs, analysis/testing, drawings, models, teaching tools and /or schematics is required. Prerequisite: ME 501, ME 510, and ME 628. Corequisite: ME 412 and ME 455. LEC
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An introduction to the underlying theory of the finite element (FE) method and its application to linear solid and structural mechanics. FE formulations are derived for bars, beams, 2D formulations such as: plane stress, plane strain, and 3D solids. Basic issues are treated such as assembly and generation of FE equations, computation, post-processing, and interpretation of FE solutions (e.g. stresses and strains analysis). Prerequisite: CE 310 and ME 508. LEC
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An introduction to the modeling, analysis, and design of linear control systems. Topics include mathematical models, feedback concepts, state-space methods, time response, system stability in the time and transform domains, design using PID control and series compensation, and digital controller implementation. Prerequisite: ME 520. LEC
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Tools to incorporate manufacturing and life-cycle concerns into the design of products. Prerequisite: ME 501 or equivalent. LEC
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A study of advanced methods for engineering analysis of practical problems utilizing fundamental principles from engineering disciplines. The emphasis is on the solution of these problems and the interpretation and generalization of the results. Prerequisite: A course in differential equations. LEC
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Design and implementation of interfaces of microcomputers to mechanical equipment. Includes laboratory experiments presenting selected industrial applications. Emphasis on human factors, functional design parameters and microprocessor interfaces. Includes instruction concerning specifications of practical hardware configurations and writing of programs necessary to accomplish mechanical systems applications. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. LEC
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Theoretical aspects of lubrication, determination of pressure distribution in bearings from viscous flow theory, application of hydrodynamic and hydrostatic bearing theories to the design of bearings, high speed bearing design problems, properties of lubricants, methods of testing. Prerequisite: ME 510 and a course in differential equations. LEC
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An advanced course in thermodynamics, mathematical in nature, with emphasis on a critical re-evaluation of the laws of thermodynamics, thermodynamics of one-dimensional gas flow, development of the classical thermodynamic relations and their application to engineering problems. Prerequisite: ME 508 and ME 412. LEC
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Dynamics of particles and of rigid bodies with advanced engineering applications; generalized coordinates; Hamilton's principles; Lagrange's equations; Hamilton-Jacobi theory. Prerequisite: ME 520. LEC
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A study of the thermodynamics and fluid dynamics of gaseous media. Emphasis is placed on the rigorous application of conservation laws to represent physical processes. Classical and statistical models for the thermodynamic and transport properties are examined. Applications include determination of gas properties, wave propagation, and high-speed flow. Prerequisite: ME 412 and ME 510 or equivalents. LEC
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Fundamental concepts behind catalytic exhaust aftertreatment devices for automobiles including both monolithic catalysts and particulate filters. Studies of other catalytic devices intended for applications in the mechanical and chemical engineering fields. Topics covered are the development of governing equations based on conservation laws and their numerical solutions using finite difference methods. Studies will include a monolithic catalyst. Project assignments will be included. Prerequisite: ME 412 and ME 510 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Linear vibration theory. Lumped parameter approximations and distributed systems. Generalized properties and numerical solutions. Prerequisite: ME 520 and ME 528. LEC
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Fundamental concepts of anatomy and physiology are introduced but the focus is on the biomechanics of human motion. Human body segment kinematics and joint kinematics are analyzed. An introduction to muscle mechanics is provided. Applications in balance and gait are covered. Corequisite: ME 520. LEC
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This course will focus on methods of experimental measurement and computational modeling used in biomechanics. Instrumentation used to measure three-dimensional motion, ground reaction forces, center of pressure and EMG measures are considered. Methods used for inverse dynamics, direct dynamics and simulation are introduced. Corequisite: ME 520. LEC
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This course will teach the production, propagation, and effects of sound waves. Detailed topics include plane wave, spherical wave, and cylindrical wave propagation in free space and waveguides, wave reflection and transmission on an interface, piston radiation, wave scattering and diffraction. Prerequisite: ME 520 or permission of instructor. LEC
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Provides an in-depth knowledge of bone as a living mechanical system. Topics include the microstructure, biology, mechanical properties, mechanical modeling, adaptation of bone to the mechanical environment, and its simulation. Students assignments include homework, a poster presentation, basic finite element analysis laboratory, and bone remodeling simulations. Prerequisite: ME 311 or equivalent. LEC
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This course will cover the fundamentals of photon transport in biological tissues, including explanations of Rayleigh and Mie scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, the radiative transport equations and more. Also, the basic physics and engineering of various optical imaging techniques for biological tissues, including ballistic or quasi-ballistic imaging (such as confocal microscopy, and optical coherence tomography), diffuse imaging, photoacoustic imaging, will be introduced. Prerequisite: ME 508 or permission of instructor. LEC
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